Public Buildings and City Landmarks, Galway

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  • Eyre square.
    Eyre square.
    by pfsmalo
  • The Oriel window, part of the doorway.
    The Oriel window, part of the doorway.
    by pfsmalo
  • Public Buildings and City Landmarks
    by pfsmalo
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    Eyre square - John F Kennedy square, Galway.

    by pfsmalo Written Dec 17, 2012

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    Eyre square.
    4 more images

    Still widely known as Eyre square and used on most maps (and Google) the square was re-named in 1965 in honour of the American president, assassinated in 1963 a few months after his visit to Galway in June the same year. The Saturday we were there the pubs were full, loads of Mums pushing prams, it seems that the locals enjoy the spot and use its open spaces to a maximum.
    There is a portrait and plaque of Kennedy on the eastern side of the park, whilst the Browne doorway and the statue of a Galway hooker (no no, this is a type of sailboat)are close to the Tourist information centre on the north side of the square. For those in need there are also toilets just by the side of the TO.
    The Browne doorway is part of the former residence of the Dominic Browne, Sherriff and then Mayor of Galway in 1609. It dates from 1627 and was moved here in 1905.

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    Sit with the Wildes- Wilde/Vilde sculpture

    by slothtraveller Written Aug 28, 2010

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    The Wilde statue

    This sculpture in the city centre was a gift from the Estonian city of Tartu to Galway in 2004. It is a replica of a sculpture in Tartu. It shows the Irish writer Oscar Wilde and the Estonian writer Edvard Vilde sharing a bench and conducting a conversation about who knows what. If you want, you can sit between them and find out!

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    See The Two Wildes Sculpture

    by BillNJ Updated Dec 14, 2009

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    On 24 April 2004, a sculpture was unveiled on William Street in the Galway city centre of the famous Irish writer, Oscar Wilde, along with the famous Estonian writer, Eduard Wilde. The sculpture is a replica of the whimsical streetscape image that sits outside the Wilde Irish Pub in Tartu, Estonia. The two Wildes were contemporary Irish and Estonian writers -- and this sculpture imagines their possible meeting in 1892. The sculpture was a gift from the people of Estonia to the people of Ireland.

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    See Sculpture Honoring Galway's Magdellan Women

    by BillNJ Updated Dec 14, 2009

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    On 8 March 2009, a public sculpture was unveiled to honor Galway's Magdellan women. The sculpture is made of carved limestone in the figure of a women lifting a veil from her head entitled “Final Journey”. The monument was created by Mick Wilkins, a local artist and stone mason. It also features inscribed poetry by playwright and poet Patricia Burke Brogan, who is internationally known for her award-winning play “Eclipsed” about the Magdalen Women.

    The Galway Magdalen Laundry used to stand at the bottom of College Road, across from the Fair Green. It was demolished in the 1990s. It was a notorious institution for women who were considered outcasts of society (prostitutes, unmarried mothers, etc.) where the inmates were forced to undertake hard physical labor.

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    Most recognised building in the city

    by sourbugger Updated Oct 18, 2008

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    Spanish arch, Galway

    The Spanish arch stands at the far end of town by the river. It is probably the most photographed and well known building in town.

    Despite the name which is actually only about 100 years old, the arch was built as an extension to the city walls in 1584. It provided safe shelter to unload boats safe from theives.

    If you visit it, look for the architectural remains including a matramonial fireplace stored in one of the arches.

    The grassy area around the arch by the river is very popular for 'chilling out' in the summer for tourists and locals alike.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    No grassy mound here - Eyre Square.

    by sourbugger Updated Sep 10, 2008

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    Eyre square in Galway is the focal point of the town. The city fathers made a real mess of it in the 1960s, and have had a go at at it again reecently. The plans for the current re-development were as good as far as they went, but they really have missed an opportunity to banish traffic from the area entirely and put in some kind of impressive focal point.

    The square is still a place to hang out in the summer and soak up the rays (such as they are in Ireland) with a motley collection of new-age hippies, backpackers, young lovers and drunks taking up all the available green space. In former times it has been the scene of more important events , such as a speech given by JFK a few months before his assassination in Dallas. In 1965 the square was re-named the Kennedy memorial Park, but I've never heard that term being used. You can find a little bust of him next to the Children's playground area.

    You can also see a picture of JFK's visit to Galway at the rear of the Tourist information office in Forster street or a bronze of his face at the side of the play park area on the square itself.

    UPDATE : SEPT 2004 - the place still resembles a giant building site. During the work some skeletons were found. They carbon tested them, and they are medieval. This means the archaelogists had to have a good dig before the works continue.

    UPDATE : AUG 2006 - all re-furishment work is now complete, and it looks fine. But where exactly did those millions of Euro get spent eh ?

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    Galway's Famous story - part 4

    by sourbugger Updated Apr 24, 2008

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    Lynch's window

    The scene now moves to the Lynch memorial window behind the church.

    The story goes that James led his son, Walter, up a series of steps to the window where a noose stood ready. the crowd who has gathered (nearly all the town) were again shouting for Walter's release. it is said that James turned to his son and said : "For the care of the soul, take the last unhappy embrace of your loving father". As Walter came towards him - he pushed him out of the window ! Walter was swinging on the rope.

    The crowd, totally stunned at the scene departed in one's and two's in silence.

    What happened to the people left ? James was never seen in public again , he died within two years. Agnes Blake, Walter's intended, died of a broken heart within six months of a broken heart.

    And the moral of the story ? The only reason Gomez went to the Blake's house that fateful night was because Agnes' father wanted to have a Spanish lesson. So the moral is : never learn a foreign language.

    The only problem with this story is that if the story is true it certainly did not happen on these stones - they are a 19th century fabrication. The world's first tourist trap, in fact.

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    Galway's famous story - part 3

    by sourbugger Updated Apr 24, 2008

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    Lynch's castle, shop street

    to return to the story of Walter....

    Walter in now held in the dungeon of the jail next to his home in Lynch's castle. It is said that most of the town (about 3,000 souls) thronged the streets. They demanded that Walter be set free. James Lynch was certainly the mayor, but the job also meant that he was the chief magistrate and executioner. During the summary trial he found his own son quilty of murder.

    The mob shouted that they would kill James if he went ahead with the execution. Many people think that this is the origin of the term 'Lynch mob'. It seems to fit, but it is in fact a Galway myth - the term has American origins.

    It is said that on that night James descended into the dungeon.

    Walter asked "Father do I have anything to hope for ?" to which the reply was :

    "No my son, your life is forfeited by laws, at sunrise you must die".

    What happens next ? Find out in part 4

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    Galway's famous story - Part 2

    by sourbugger Written Nov 2, 2007

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    to continue our story of Walter....

    Spurned by his fiancee at the ball, Walter wants to keep a close eye on this swarthy Spaniard, Gomez. The very next night he observes him entering the Blake family home and departing about an hour later. You can imagine what he must have thought.

    Donning a disguise and calling out in a strange voice, he begins to chase Gomez through the backstreets of Galway, eventually ending up in the port area somewhere near the area where Spanish Arch now stands.

    In one swift move he approaches Gomez from behind and runs a sword straight through him, kicking his body into the water's edge. He makes a sharp exit.

    Very soon, some of the men find the body Gomez (including James Lynch, Walter's father) and a white scarf, which was only worn by members of the Lynch family.

    Walter is pursued on horseback up into the hills that surround the town. When he is captured, he says quite a strange thing :

    "Can you direct me to the prison". This was rather odd, as he lived next door to it.

    What happens next... ? We will find out in Part 3

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    Galway City Museum

    by ernie01 Written Oct 9, 2007

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    We stopped here on our first full day in town. Although it's not as flashy as some of the big city museums it had some excelent exibits. I learned a lot about Galway in a couple of hours, and IT"S FREE ! Want to learn the history of the Cladgha Culture? or see a real Galway Hooker ? This is the place.

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Budget Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Spanish Arch

    by kevarms Written Jun 8, 2007

    Not as interesting as it sounds. The Spanish Arch is part of the old city walls dating from the 16th century and was built to protect ships docked at the harbour. Adjacent is the Blind Arch which contains an old fireplace.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Lynch's Castle

    by kevarms Written Jun 8, 2007

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    Now a branch of the AIB bank, Lynch's Castle (actually a fortifed townhouse) is a lovely piece of medieval Galway.
    There is an interesting story about one historic resident. In 1493 the Mayor of Galway was James Lynch. His son murdered a love-rival, but the Lynch clan was so feared and powerful nobody was willing to carry out his execution. So his own father did the job! This is sometimes suggested as a source for the expression 'lynch law'.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Galway City Museum

    by kevarms Written Jun 8, 2007

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    Located in a brand new building behind the Spanish Arch (the old one was adjacent to it). The museum is free which was just as well as I was slightly disappointed. For a city with such a wealth of history and character I expected a bit more. Still, it's new, so I hope things will improve. I did like the specially built Galway Hooker and the exhibit about The Claddagh.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    University of Galway

    by leplaya Written Oct 16, 2006

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    Located along the Corrib just north of the city (follow the river). Built in 1845, the university has a student body of about 15000. The main building is nice, but there isn’t much there unless you want to be a student.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    Eyre Square

    by leplaya Written Jul 20, 2006

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    The center square of Galway is next to the bus and train stations. It contains a few sculptures, but (although it’s praised by all the guide books) for the most part it is just a grassy area that people take a break and relax.

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