Blasket Islands, Dingle

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  • Blasket Islands
    by rcsparty
  • Blasket Islands
    by globetrott
  • Blasket Islands
    by heyjude000
  • rcsparty's Profile Photo

    Blasket Islands

    by rcsparty Updated Feb 16, 2008

    The Blasket Islands are a series of 7 rocky islands just offshore. The largest is shaped like a dead man laying in the water. During the summer, you can take a 2-3 hour boat trip around the islands to veiw the wildlife on land and in the sea, as long as the sea is not too rough. The largest was inhabited until the 1950's.

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    The Blasket islands

    by globetrott Written Mar 29, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Blasket Islands are just a few hundred meters off the west-coast of Dingle-Peninsula and Great Blasket, the biggest of these islands was still inhabited by a few farmers untill 1953. Most of the inhabitants had left the islands in the 19th and 20th century and searched for their luck in America, because life became too hard in the remote islands.
    Nowadays you may easily take the ferryboat from Dunquin in order to explore the Blasket Islands. You may still see the remains of the church and several houses there.
    In 1588 the Santa Maria de la Rosa, a ship of the spanish armada sunk in that area around the Blaskets.
    You may click here in order to see the Blasket Islands on a map :
    www.multimap.com

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    The Great Blasket Islands

    by heyjude000 Written Feb 2, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    hree miles west of the tip of the Dingle Peninsula, the Great Blasket Island rises spectacularly from the Atlantic. It is renowned for its historic, cultural and literary heritage.

    In the 1920s and 1930s the Blasket Island writers produced books which are deemed classics in the world of literature. They wrote of Island people living on the very edge of Europe, and brought to life the topography, life and times of their Island. They wrote all of their stories in the Irish language.

    Sadly, the Blasket Island community declined as a result of the persistent emigration of its young people, until eventually the Island was abandoned in 1953 when only 22 inhabitants remained.

    The Great Blasket Island remains uninhabited today, but visitors can travel by ferry over to this remote and wildly beautiful place and spend several hours or all day marvelling at its natural beauty and what remains of years of human endeavour.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking

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