Wexford Things to Do

  • The local pub and eatery
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Best Rated Things to Do in Wexford

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    The beach at Bannow

    by nandywell Written Sep 15, 2004

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    Each time you go down to the beach it looks different, the tide is so strong it pushes the sand and stones around and it transforms the beach each day. As you can see from the picture is doesnt get very crowded!!! This is a real bonus having a daughter living so close to such a wonderful place.

    Me and my man friday!!
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    Wexford

    by ettenaj Written Nov 29, 2003

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    Wexford shopping, there ary many delightful shops and boutiques in the town centre, even some charity shops ( which I cant resist ) all in one street. Cafes., pubs, supermarkets, bookshops, clothes, vegetables all you could wish for in one street

    Looking toward Wexford town

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    Fall for Thatch

    by SabrinaSummerville Updated Apr 8, 2006

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    I took a photo safari in Wexford this week and discovered the thatched cottages. They are everywhere and are extremely pretty - no, beautiful.

    I have displayed just a few of the many pics I took. Each little cottage is a work of art in itself. Look at the angles, the names, the coloured doors, the beautiful gardens. Many of them have made great use of the roadside hedgerows and planted them with the prettiest flowers.

    Fall in love with thatch yourself - you will find plenty of it all around county Wexford. I loved them so much that I created a whole page here for you to fall in love, too:-)

    The Beauty that is Thatch
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    Norman sights in Wexford

    by Dabs Written Aug 16, 2009

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    As we were wandering around Wexford we came across a couple of things that date back to the time of the Normans at the north end of town on Westgate and Selskar Avenue.

    Westgate Tower is the only tower remaining of the original five gateways in the Norman and Viking town walls, it was built in the 13th century. The plaque on the wall says it fell into disrepair in 1463 but was restored during the Confederate Wars of 1641.

    Right near Westgate Tower is the ruin of the 12th century Selskar Abbey where the treaty between the Irish and the Normans was signed in 1169. It's also believed that Henry II spent Lent in 1172 here doing penance for having Thomas a Becket beheaded. The Abbey was founded by Alexander de la Roche who left Ireland to fight in the crusades, upon his return he discovered that his fiancee, who thought he was dead, became a nun. At least she didn't follow Juliet's path when she thought Romeo was dead!

    Cromwell's troops destroyed the Abbey, along with six others in 1649.

    Selskar Abbey Selskar Abbey Westgate Tower City wall

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    hook

    by ettenaj Written Sep 23, 2003

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    hook lighthouse, a definate, very interesting guided tour inside the light house, nice little cafe and shop on site, whilst we were there the sea was very rough and the views from the tio of Hook were quite spectacular, we also saw seals bobbing around in the surf!!

    Hook Lighthouse
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    Haven by the River

    by SabrinaSummerville Written Apr 8, 2006

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    Although the Ferrycarrig is both a Hotel and a wonderful place to eat, I put this tip under Things to Do because it deserves an entire day out in itself.

    The Ferrycarrig Hotel is about a mile and a half outside Wexford Town, heading towards Waterford, just off the roundabout.

    It's just beautiful, not least for its setting.

    It is situated on a very wide part of the river and the hotel has made the best use of the location in every way. The design and landscaping is second to none.

    There is a wonderful deck overlooking the river and it's the most perfect place to sit on a sunny summer evening watching the sun set as you sip a pint of cider.

    The river area is a haven for wild birds. You will also see gentle pleasure craft floating by, and the more enthusiastic of you will enjoy watching the water skiing.

    When you get peckish the hotel offers a bar food menu like no other I have experienced - delicious stuff that you would expect from a high class restaurant, plus local staples like seafood chowder and mussels, all from fish caught locally. It's a lovely place to bring children, too, as they accept them warmly and there's a special kids menu in the bar. However, keep an eye on them if they wander outside by the river.

    Even on a wet day you can sit inside the bar and look out, as the hotel once again makes the best of the location by the use of huge picture windows.

    I will post a pic or two, but you really have to go here to see what it's all about.

    View from ferrycarrig Deck on a foggy day
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    Visit Kilmore Quay

    by SabrinaSummerville Written Apr 8, 2006

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    Kilmore Quay is a very picturesque fishing village situated about 7 miles from Wexford.

    It's a lovely place to go to watch both fishing boats and pleasure craft, and if you're lucky maybe some of the fishermen will give you some freshly caught fish.

    For me the nicest thing about this area is the great selection of seafood restaurants and also the pubs that serve great food in a casual setting. I don't have a particular favourite, and would urge you to discover your own.

    Once again you will find a terrific selection of quaint cottages in this village.

    Head to the hotel Saltees and have a chat wih the two elderly brothers who still run this place. They will be a fountain of local knowledge and tips for you.

    See what you can do about taking a boat trip out to the Saltee Islands. I've never done it, but I think it would be great. There';s something about Irish Islands that makes them particularly wild and remote. If you fancy yourself as a young Maureen O'Hara this would be a great place to get your "olde Ireland" pics taken!!!

    Boats at Kilmore Quay
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    Twin churches

    by Dabs Updated Aug 15, 2009

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    There are two twin churches in Wexford that date from the 19th century, they have identical exteriors, their foundation stones were laid on the same day and they are the same height. The Church of the Immaculate Conception is on Rowe Street and the Church of the Assumption is on Bride Street.

    It seems rather odd to have two identical churches but as it came out of the need to provide more space for the existing parishoners, it may have been a sensible thing to do as you only had to come up with one architect and one design.

    If you want to read more about the history of these two churches, the website below has a full account of their creation.

    Church of the Immaculate Conception Church of the Assumption

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    The Irish National Heritage Park - Christian Age

    by Nobbe Updated Jul 25, 2003

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    Christianity probably arrived in Ireland by the 4th century. Early in the 5th century it was given an added impetus by the arrival of missionaries sent by the Pope in Rome. The most famous of these was St. Patrick, who arrived in 432 AD, and preached mainly in the North of Ireland. Although Christianity triumphed all over the country, traces of Paganism remained for centuries.

    Church
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    The Irish National Heritage Park - Christian Age

    by Nobbe Updated Jul 25, 2003

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    In unsettled times Irish round towers provided secure refuge for people and possessions. Their doorways could be up to 5 meters above ground level only reached by a ladder; in peaceful times to a society used to single storey dwellings their imposing height ( they could be up to 35 meters high ) marked the importance of their inhabitants.
    The base of the tower was usually some 4.5 meters in diameter, the walls could be up to 1.5 meters thick. Their foundations were surprisingly shallow, less than a meter, and to provide extra strength they were usually filled up to the level of the door with packed stones and rubble bonded with lime mortar. Most Round Towers had wooden floors, although there are two surviving examples with stone floors. Very few intermediate storeys had windows but the top floors usually had four, facing the cardinal points.
    They were used as belfries ( for tongueless hand bells), as watch towers, as beacons, as storehouses for religious treasures and relics, as a refuge in times of trouble and much more

    Round Tower
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    Johnstown Castle Gardens

    by Dabs Updated Aug 16, 2009

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    On our way into Wexford we stopped by the Johnstown Castle Gardens for a walk through the grounds. The castle, built for the Grogan-Morgan family between 1810-1855, is not open to visitors as it now houses an agricultural college, but the grounds are open to the public and we spent at least an hour or so here walking the grounds and stopping for tea and a scone at the Peacock Tea Room. There is also the Irish Agricultural Museum with exhibits on the potato and the Great Famine, it was 6€ to visit and really not high on my list on things to see so we passed on it.

    The only charge was a parking charge of 6€ per car from May-September, the Peacock Tea Room is only open from May-September.

    Johnstown Castle

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    The Irish National Heritage Park - Stone Age

    by Nobbe Updated Jul 25, 2003

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    Have a visit to The Irish National Heritage Park and explore 9000 years of irish history. The park is situated approximately 3 miles from Wexford Town, on the Dublin - Rosslare road (N11).

    For the first 5000 years after their arrival in Ireland, the inhabitants used tools and weapons made from stone, wood and bone.
    The earliest settlers came to an island covered with trees (pine, birch, hazel and willow). There was an abundance of wild animals for food, and from archaeological excavations, they must have lived almost entirely by hunting. Their "houses" would have been something like the one on the photo.

    Hut - Stone Age
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    The Irish National Heritage Park - Stone Age

    by Nobbe Updated Jul 25, 2003

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    Farming began in Ireland about 4,000 BC, and for the first time the inhabitants were not solely dependant on hunting for their food. They used polished stone axes to clear areas of trees, to prepare them for grazing and for crops. They used the timber to build houses and fences to prevent their animals from predators such as wolves.

    One the photo you can see a farmhouse on the left, and a shelter for animals on the right.

    Timber houses
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    The Irish National Heritage Park - Bronze Age

    by Nobbe Updated Jul 25, 2003

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    A technical revolution began in Ireland with the introduction of copper, and later bronze. This alloy of tin and copper could be beaten into different shapes or cast by pouring it into stone or clay moulds. These new tools and implements meant that farmers could buy more land and cultivate it better. There is evidence of well-developed field systems at this time, including the use of crop rotation.

    Stone circles date from the Neolithic - Early Bronze age (around 2,000 BC). These were sacred places, for the performance of rituals, whose nature and purpose remain a mystery. They may have been associated with the dead, as some burials have been found within some of those excavated.

    Stone circles
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    The Irish National Heritage Park - Christian Age

    by Nobbe Updated Jul 25, 2003

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    From around 550 AD a major change took place in the Irish Church, with the arrival of Monasticism. This form of Christianity originated in the Egyptian desert and spread quickly across Europe. Its ideals of seclusion and prayer seemed to appeal greatly to the Irish people, and Monastic Settlements were very quickly established throughout the country.

    Church
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Wexford Things to Do

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