Dublin, Ireland

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    Trinity College & the Book of Kells

    by globetrott Updated Jan 4, 2008

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    Trinity College in Dublin
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    Even when you are not very much interested in the rest of Dublin, this place is a Must for every tourist : Trinity College, the university of Dublin was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I at a place where an Augustinan monastery used to be before. The Campanile / belfry on my picture dates back to 1853 and is 30 meters high.Inside Trinity College you will see one of the most precious books of christianity :
    The Book of Kells
    It is a hand-written book with beautiful and ornate decorations and paintings. It dates back to the year 806 and contains the 4 gospel. The Book of kells is the main attraction in the library and it is shown behing a thick glass, and millions of people see it every year, so be prepared for long waiting-lines there !!
    On my link below you can see lots of great pics of the book of Kells !

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    the famous Georgian doors of Merrion Square

    by globetrott Updated Mar 2, 2008

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    This is my favorite part of Dublin: Merrion Square, dating back to the 18th century with plenty of houses in the so-called Georgian style, and while all of the buildings looked exactely the same - beeing built of simple red bricks, without any decorations - someone had the great idea to have at least the doors painted in different colours.
    In fact nobody cares today about the rather boring fassades anymore, but everyone is looking for the fancy doors and you can see them on plenty of postcards and you may even buy a large poster with almost 100 different such Georgian doors of Dublin !!

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    Halfpennybrigde

    by globetrott Updated Jan 4, 2008

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    Halfpennybrigde is an easy way to get across the river Liffey in the centre of Dublin and while it is free of charge today it once used to be a toll-brigde and the toll to cross it was 1/2 penny...
    ...THAT time is over, but I read on another VT-page ( by Greebo ) - that it is a great way to learn lots of local Irish expressions, when you try to cross that bridge with a lot of luggage ;-)
    The river Liffey is quite a dirty river and it devides the rich southern part of Dublin from the poor northern part.
    And in fact you should get across the bridge and walk the sidestreets of the northern part - some of these streets are really intimidating with strange people walking around, almost empty streets and barbed-wires on top of several fences...
    You will be glad to be back in the southern part again !!

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    Dublin

    by kentishgirl Updated Oct 31, 2004

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    Dublin

    Dublin is located on the East coast of Ireland, and is the countries capital.
    Its a thriving city, very cosmopolitan with plenty of shopping, great nighlife and loads to visit.

    The must see's in Dublin would be the Guiness brewery and the Jameson distillery. Be sure to take a trip out to Kilmainham jail, and wander the Liffey Boardwalks.

    At night, most tourists hit Temple Bar, and sample the many bars, clubs and restaurants that this area offers, to be honest, the Dubs dont really go out in Temple Bar themselves very often, so its worth going out elsewhere and visiting a few of the suburbian pubs as well.

    Dublin is split in two, the northside and the southside, when crossing the river, make sure that you cross via the Ha'Penny bridge - you dont have to pay to cross it!!! Lol

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    Dublin

    by magor65 Written Sep 14, 2006

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    If you come to Dublin by plane, the first thing that surprises you when the plane gets lower over the airport are green fields. I think that few capital cities have such landscapes around. After a few hours spent in the city you ask yourself: where are the skyscrapers, or underground stations? In fact there are none. It doesn't mean though that Dublin is provincial; actually it is a cosmopolitan city with vibrant atmosphere.
    It's true that there are few spectacular monuments there but Dublin has so many faces that you won't be bored for sure. It is not very big so most tourist attractions are within the walking distance. The places definitely worth seeing include:
    - TrinityCollege (with the famous Book of Kells),
    - Dublin Castle
    - St Patrick's Cathedral
    and of course beautiful parks.
    It's just impossible not to spend some time in Temple Bar, whether you like it or not. This district of pubs and restaurants is especially popular with tourists and participants of hen and stag parties. On Friday and Saturday evenings it is so crowded that it's hard to walk without constant bumping into others. But of course there are some quarters of Dublin that are quiet and peaceful at any time. We enjoyed walking along the streets of Ballsbridge where we admired rich Victorian and Georgian villas with colourful doors and decorated knockers.
    And you can always jump on DART (Dublin Area Rapid Transport) and within minutes you will be in another world of little seaside villages, beaches or picturesque castles.

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    An oasis of peace in the heart of the city

    by scottishvisitor Updated Dec 12, 2005

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    Wonderful water views

    St. Stephen's Green is a beautiful Georgian park featuring stunning water viewsof the lake and pretty water fountains . The gardens provide a nice place to relax & enjoy natures great trees & colourful flowers.
    A welcome break from the hustle & bustle of the city

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    Dublin, Bank of Ireland

    by Joenes Updated Mar 29, 2007

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    Bank of Ireland

    Impressive building with beautiful architecture.
    First used as the first purpose-built Parliament House in Europe!
    It is also the start of the walk through the "Old City" as I printed out from the internet (see website)

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    Dublin, Trinity College

    by Joenes Updated Oct 6, 2005

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    Trinity College
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    Queen Elizabeth founded this college in 1592.
    Most famous for it's Old Library and the Book of Kells which can be found in The Treasury.
    Very impressive place to have a walk around with big squares and a lot of green surrounding it as well .

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    Dublin houses

    by magor65 Written Sep 15, 2006

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    Dublin houses
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    Apart from visiting tourist attractions I always love walking around some residential disitricts to see how ordinary people live. It's interesting to notice how much the housing architecture differs depending on the country. The reasons are various; first of all such obvious ones like climate and material available, but of course historical factors and fashion also count.

    It's good that at least some of Dublin Georgian houses have been preserved. They come from the 18th century - the time of Dublin's prosperity, when a lot of new broad streets and fine squares were laid out ( the preserved example is Merrion Square). The main building material was brick and the dominant feature was uniformity of appearance. But seemingly dull rows of houses were enlivened by charming details which gave each house individual touch. It's a shame that a big part of Georgian city later ceased to exisit. Many residential buildings were transformed into tenement houses shared by several families and due to negliegence and the lack of funds gradually fell into decline. Then in the 1960', 70' and 80' many were destroyed to give way for office blocks.
    Luckily, there are still districts where you still can enjoy the view of old Georgian or Victorian houses. Go to Ballsbridge, for example. Looking at the famous colourful doors, so common there, I wondered if the decorative factor was the only task they had. Perhaps they help the owners to tell their house from another, especially when the man is coming back from a pub.

    Look at the other picture. It was taken in a newer housing estate and shows the tendency to arrange windows to obtain the 'uniformity of appearance' effect: the same curtains, figures and plants. I was surprised how common this fashion is.

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    Most important historical building in Ireland ?

    by sourbugger Written Sep 24, 2004

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    GPO Dublin

    Post a letter with a sense of history...

    From the Dublin page

    Ireland must be the only country in the world where the most important historical building in a country is a Post Office. but
    the GPO has a special place in Irish and Dublin history being the focal point of the Easter Rising of 1916. It was here that the Proclamation of Independence was read and the building was gutted in the battle (as was most of Lower O'Connell Street).

    You can still (if you look closely) see some of the scars of battle on the outside of the building itself. A statue inside commemorates the rising.

    Despite independence Nelson's column still stood outside - but this was blown up in the 1960's.

    The edifice itself is clearly in the 'Greek Temple' tradition of public architecture. Inside the building is still a post office - but take time while getting your stamps to look at the very impressive ceiling.

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    Dublin

    by Goner Updated Jul 24, 2008

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    City of Dublin
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    Monday, October 3 - DUBLIN

    The sky was a blue that has never been seen in Los Angeles. But with the clear sky and fluffy clouds came wind and a wind chill factor that chilled you to the bone. We put on all the clothes we had brought and jumped the Dart for the 11 miles ride to Tara Station. We hoofed the few blocks to Trinity College. Our objective was to see the famous "Book of Kells". We were met at the entrance with a pack of yelling and screaming students who insisted we join their club. We relented and joined the Phil Society that is the oldest, 300 years old to be exact. We were treated like all the other students, even ate in their cafeteria where we had the great fortune of talking to the students about Trinity College. They informed us anyone rich or poor as long as he was Irish could be educated at Trinity. An educated youth with no chance for employment in their country.

    In April of 2008, much of this has changed. Dublin shows its prosperity with tower cranes and suburb expansion, with busy overcrowded streets like cities in the rest of the world. However, there is still the Irish flavor in the pubs and the charm of the Irish culture that can only be experienced when you visit Dublin.

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    Grafton Street

    by Goner Updated Aug 29, 2003

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    Grafton Street

    We wandered Grafton Street and it's many shops bracing ourselves against the wind. We then hopped the Dart and sat across from two colorful gentlemen, one who was chatty with a wonderful Irish brogue and one who had too much Guinness.

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    Dun Laoghaire

    by Goner Updated Sep 7, 2003

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    200 Year-Old B&B

    Sunday, October 2 - Galway - Dun Loaghaire

    Cold shower this morning, didn't know we had to pull the string behind the door to get hot water - that's life on an Irish farm. Our hostess was the mother of eight now grown children. She still cooked for eight by the size of our breakfast.

    On the road again. An uninteresting and uneventful damp trip to Dublin, actually a round-about to Dun Laoghaire. We were still wishing the trains were still on strike in England so we could get our money back and remain in Ireland, we were hooked!

    We dumped the car at the ferry station, hoping that none of the damage was done by yours truly. Found a 200-year old B & B right across the street from the ferry station and right across from the Dart. Bath down the hall, large room with fuschia walls and lopsided floors, but what can you expect from a 200-year old row house. There was a magnificent fireplace filled with dusty plastic flowers.


    For more information on Marlene's B&B see my hotel tips.

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    It's the biggest, and pointiest

    by sourbugger Written Nov 23, 2005

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    Wellington's todger

    Phoenix park claims to be the biggest urban park in Europe. At over 1,700 acres you can certainly feel that you are well away from the hub-hub and congestion of Dublin city.

    It says alot about the politics of the Irish state that in this setting stands not only the home of the Irish Premier, but also the home of the U.S Ambassador.

    The most obvious architectural feature in the park the is the tallest obelisk in Europe. It is 205 feet tall, and was intended to be taller but for a shortage of funds. Completed in 1861 it commemorates Wellington (The Iron Duke), who was actually Dublin Born and Bred. Having said that apparantly many Dubliners just refer to it as the 'Phoenix park monument'.

    Wellington himself, commenting on his Dublin origins is quoted as saying "Just because you are born in a stable ...does not make you an ass".

    (Perhaps he missed the fact that the most famous person in history was born in a stable)

    There are also four bronze plaques cast from cannons captured at Waterloo - three of which has pictorial representations of his career while the fourth has an inscription.

    Asia and Europe, saved by thee, proclaim
    (Soubugger : No Boasting then ?)
    Invincible in war thy deathless name,
    Now round thy brow the civic oak we twine
    That every earthly glory may be thine.

    If ever you wanted an example of an Alpha-male in life - then here you have it.

    Even after his demise his erection soars over the park.

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    Guinness Storehouse

    by molough Written Nov 14, 2007

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    mmmmmm
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    We loved the Guinness Storehouse. I never realized how much goes into making a pint of Guinness. You walk through three or four floors of Guinness history, learning all about hops, barley, yeast, water, etc. that goes into making Guinness. It's really quite fascinating. On the second floor there is a section that is dedicated to the advertising icons like the toucan, walrus, ostrich and Guinness surfer. That is particularly interesting. The tour ends with a free pint of Guinness in the Gravity Bar, which is on the top floor. You get a great 360-degree view of Dublin. When we were up there, a huge rainbow came out. It was beautiful. The bartender also sang a couple traditional Irish songs, which added to the atmosphere. Those who knew the words sang along.

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