Rock of Cashel, Ireland

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  • Rock of Cashel
    by ChristaV
  • Hore Abbey in Cashel
    Hore Abbey in Cashel
    by globetrott
  • Drive around a turn in the road and wow
    Drive around a turn in the road and wow
    by Fig33
  • amandajayne81's Profile Photo

    Rock of Cashel

    by amandajayne81 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Looking up at the Rock of Cashel

    This was one of the main places I was keen to see as soon as I started planning my trip. Unfortunately the weather was rainy and windy so we probably didn't get as much out of our visit as we could have. We didn't time it very well and missed out on joined a guided tour. We did however see the well put together audio visual feature which was very interesting. Just amazing to be surrounded by so much history and the view itself from on top of the hill is stunning. Worth the admission.

    Admision Fees: . Adult - €5.30;.. Senior Citizen - €3.70; .. Student (valid I.D.) - €2.10; .. Family - €11.50

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  • kathycollins's Profile Photo

    The Rock of Cashel in Co...

    by kathycollins Updated Apr 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cooormac's Chapel

    The Rock of Cashel in Co Tipperary is the most amazing place to visit. The location itself is inspiring, rising above the surrounding countryside in dominance. Site of a 5th century stone fort (a cashel)and St. Patrick's preaching to the Kings of Munster, in 1127 Cormac MacCarthaigh built his chapel here. His sarcophagus remains in the chapel.

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  • ChristaV's Profile Photo

    Rock of Cashel

    by ChristaV Written Oct 12, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It was not included in our itenerary, but the guide at Dunmore Caves convinced us that we should visit this site. I am not sorry that we took the detour, however they were busy with renovations so part of the site was closed to the public when we got there. A very interesting group of medieval buildings set on the hill above the village.

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  • donpaul77's Profile Photo

    Seat of the High Kings

    by donpaul77 Written Jan 18, 2009

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    Rock of Cashel
    1 more image

    The Rock of Cashel is the image of enduring strength. It seems to have grown out of the the massive rocky hill and rules the countryside. The Rock if Cashel is one of the most important places in Ireland and has a very dense history, as it was the seat of the High Kings for many years.

    The site started off humble and has evolved over the centuries, and examples of architecture from different eras can been studied. Imagine the High King looking out from this place and sensing the scope of his power. It is a tremendous view.

    St. Patrick's high cross is one of the major attractions here, as well as many other well preserved ancient artifacts that give a hint as to life in days gone.

    Admission is around 5 euro for adults.

    Also within walking distance is Hore Abbey, which is worth the short jaunt.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Hore Abbey

    by globetrott Updated Jan 11, 2008

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    Hore Abbey in Cashel
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    Hore Abbey is the quite strange name of the old monastery-ruins opposite of the Rock of Cashel. Unfortunately it is standing on a private property and there is no way to walk there, you are able to just make a photograph from a large distance like I did.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    a giant monastery

    by globetrott Updated Jan 11, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    on the Rock of Cashel
    4 more images

    The Rock of Cashelis a sight that you will see already from a big distance : an old monastery built on top of a rock and dating back to the 12th century. There is a Gothic cathedral from the 13th century, a high-cross and a round tower and lots of great details. You have to pay an entrancefee at the gate and will be able to explore the sight on your own !
    The Rock of Cashel is open for visitors :
    Mid September - Mid October, Daily, 9.00am - 5.30pm
    Mid October - Mid March, Daily, 9.00am - 4.30pm
    Mid March - Early June, Daily, 9.00am - 5.30pm
    Early June - Mid September, Daily, 9.00am - 7.00pm

    Closed 24th to 26th December inclusive.
    Last admission 45 mins. before closing

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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  • Fig33's Profile Photo

    Must Visit

    by Fig33 Written Sep 27, 2007
    Drive around a turn in the road and wow
    2 more images

    If you are travelling in the south of Ireland you must see the Rock of Cashel. It is an incredible sight. If you are travelling on the road from HolyCross Abbey you pass through Irish farmland and then you turn a corner in the road and all of a sudden there is this amazing Abbey sitting atop this rockly fist. It will take your breath away. The history of the Rock is also amazing it's too long to get into here, do a little reading on Cashel, it will impress you.

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  • This is not a ordinary Rock

    by gardenglenn Written Jun 2, 2007

    The Rock of Cashel, I asked my friend "what is the big deal about a rock?" It is not really a rock ..It is an ancient preserved castle and cemetery, Breathtaking views of the countryside. Very beautiful and scenicly situated. It does sit upon a huge "rock" or mountian. As you approach the city it appears on the hill. It can be quite cold and breezy, even in summer. Not to miss. bring a sweater as it is windy up there and good walking whoes for the many stairs and paths.

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  • danmcf's Profile Photo

    Rock of Cashel , religious centre

    by danmcf Updated Apr 26, 2007
    The Rock of Cashel
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    Originally the seat of the Kings of Munster, they gave it to the church in 1101 (supposedly to keep it out of the hands of a rival).
    Neat group of buildings on a rocky citadel. With buildings from the 12th through the 15th centuries. Great views across the Tipperary plain on one side, and town of Cashel on the other.
    One of the highlights of our trip.

    You'll have to park at the base and walk up, but it wasn't that difficult.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • JonED's Profile Photo

    "Cashel of the Kings"

    by JonED Updated Jul 22, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    This is a group of buildings, including a round tower, a castle, and a cathedral, built on a huge limestone outcropping. These massive structures are fused together and at a glance would seem to be just one building, but they were actually built hundreds of years apart, mostly between the 12th and 15th centuries.

    When you visit this site, you can choose to go with a guided tour or simply wander around at your leisure. Many tour groups stop here so you can expect it to be crowded. Also visit the ruined abbey at the bottom of the hill, across the road. Admission to the abbey is free and it's a good way to escape from the crowds.

    Related to:
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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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  • tauroctonia's Profile Photo

    Majestic and medieval

    by tauroctonia Written Jan 9, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Rock of Cashel as seen while approaching
    1 more image

    The Rock of Cashel is like a landmark, 60 meters high, seen from any direction, therefore not to be missed. Two different churches are built into each other, representing different periods in time and architectural styles. I remember a strange story of the archbishop being at the same time a Protestant and Catholic...

    Walking around the ruins, I felt like entering another world, especially while seeing the age-old graves and the typical crosses with their Celtic ornaments. The view down into the wide green plains is great. You can e.g. see the ruins of the monastery of Hore Abbey.

    How to get there:
    There are busses to Cashel, but the service is not very frequent (every 1 to 2 hours). If, for example, you’d like to visit Cashel from Kilkenny, you have to take 3 busses altogether changing in Clonmel and Cahir. So, take into consideration that you might take longer than expected.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    Rock Of Cashel

    by kentishgirl Updated Oct 31, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rock of Cashel

    Cashel is a small town located in County Tipperary, the main feature here is the huge Rock Of Cashel that dominates the town.
    The Rock Stands high up on a hill overlooking the town, its actually a castle so dont visit expecting a rock as such! Lol

    The walk to the top is pretty steep, and there are cafes and shops catering for visitors at the bottom.

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    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    ROCK OF CASHEL

    by hevbell Updated Dec 12, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rock of Cashel

    The Rock of Cashel consists of ancient fortifications atop a huge limestone rock. The word Cashel is derived from the Irish for fortress. For more than a thousand years it was the base of kings and religious leaders who ruled over the area, having been chosen as a base by the E?ghanachta clan from Wales in the 4th Century.
    You enter through the Hall of the Vicars Choral which contains St Patricks Cross, and then can enter the now roofless Cathedral, the round tower and Cormacs Chapel which is still completely intact despite having been built from 1127..

    Entry ?4.45

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  • Bobsy's Profile Photo

    The Rock of Cashel

    by Bobsy Written Dec 2, 2003
    The Rock

    The Rock of Cashel is a rocky outcrop atop a hill in a valley. Doesn't sound too impressive does it? However, factor in a grand abbey and some amazing views and you have a recipe for success. The Abbey is now in ruins, but it is fairly easy to reconstruct what it may have looked like because the bare bones of the structure remain. Don't forget to check out the tombs which are set into the walls of the structure. The hill is windswept, but affords great views of the surrounding countryside.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • kathycollins's Profile Photo

    The Rock of Cashel

    by kathycollins Updated Aug 11, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Rock of Cashel is a multi-facetted jewel. Besides Cormac's Chapel, it also contains a Round Tower, St. Patrick's Cathedral, St. Patrick's Cross, and many other fascinating relics of Ireland's past. Interesting guided tours are included in the price of admission.

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