Maughold Travel Guide

  • Cross-house
    Cross-house
    by GeoV
  • Keeill in churchyard
    Keeill in churchyard
    by GeoV
  • Maughold church
    Maughold church
    by GeoV

Maughold Things to Do

  • Ellie22's Profile Photo

    by Ellie22 Written Mar 11, 2014

    This glen was formed by the Cornaa river and makes for a beautiful walk through the woodland.The paths through the glen follow the river to the top of the glen and then circle round to the car park.The paths are uneven so not suitable for pushchairs or wheelchairs. If you want a longer walk there is also a path that leads to the beach at Port Cornaa.

    N.B. Its easy to get to on the Manx Electric Railway since it has its own station.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Ellie22's Profile Photo

    by Ellie22 Written Mar 8, 2014

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    The church goes back to the 11th century, though there have been alterations and extensions since. There are 44 crosses at the church, most are Celtic though some are Norse. The integration between the Vikings and the Celts living on the Isle of Man is shown by memorials carved with both Scandinavian and Gaelic names.

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  • GeoV's Profile Photo

    by GeoV Written Nov 8, 2010

    As with a number of parishes in the north of the island (in particular), the main things to see are the parish church and its crosses. The church at Maughold dates from the 11th or 12th century onwards but within the churchyard are also the ruins of three 'keeills'. These are not much to look at - being simply foundations - but they are examples of the earliest remains of churches in the Island, from before the parochial system developed in the 12th century. (There are others in the Island but these are probably the easiest to get at.) The churchyard 'cross-house' contains some 45 crosses and fragments, (the majority of which were found in the churchyard itself). Among these is Guriat's Cross - the name relates to a Welsh prince - which is Celtic in design and probably dates from the 9th century. Inside the church (having formerly stood outside the churchyard) is the parish cross from around 1300, the only one of its kind remaining in the Island.

    Maughold church Keeill in churchyard Cross-house Guriat's Cross Parish cross
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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Maughold Off The Beaten Path

  • Ellie22's Profile Photo

    by Ellie22 Written Mar 8, 2014

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    Cashtal yn Ard (the Castle of the Heights) is one of three Neolithic tombs, dating from around 2000 BC and is the best preserved. It was originally a megalithic chambered cairn, most likely used as communal burial site for Neolithic chieftains and families. The site was excavated in the 1930s and later in the 1990s.

    The site is along the east coast of the Island, along the way to Cornaa from Glen Mona on a hill, there is a footpath which leads there.

    Cashtal yn Ard
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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Maughold Travel Guide
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