Fun things to do in Isle of Man

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Isle of Man

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    Castle Rushen

    by KristaB Updated Jul 17, 2004

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    Impressive, amazingly well preserved medieval castle is dominating the panorama of Castletown.

    Its origins can be traced back to Norse Kings of Mann, who fortified this strategic site in order to protect the entrance to the Silverburn River from the sea.
    Central stone tower is the oldest, surrounded by courtyard, which was later surrounded with yet another defence wall.

    Inside the castle there is a museum presenting the story of the castle, its inhabitants, rulers and the whole island.
    It was the seat of Kings and Lords of Mann through centuries, and even in recent history it served as a symbol of power - being used as a prison.

    Castle Rushen
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    The House of Manannan

    by KristaB Updated Jul 17, 2004

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    This is one of the best museums I've ever vsiited, and my kids were enjoying it very much, too.

    It presents Celtic, Viking and Maritime traditions of the island, through high-tech suported installations. You are walking from one room to another, and follow the stories presented through sound, video, robotized dummies and even scents that are released into rooms - while visiting the exhibit that depicts kipper factory, the smell is ... authentic!

    The House of Manannan Museum was declared British Museum of The Year twice.

    Odin's Raven Viking ship
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    The Manx Museum

    by KristaB Updated Jul 17, 2004

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    If you are staying in Douglas, this is the first place you should visit, to get a broad overview over history, way of life and monuments on the Isle of Man.

    Many interesting arcaeological exhibits, from minerals and skeletons to postcards and modern artefacts.

    Since I was determined to visit many museums and historic locations, I decided to become a member of Manx National Heritage to save on entrance fees. You can do that here at the reception desk.

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    Goudrum Rules!

    by KristaB Updated Jul 18, 2004

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    Some displays at the museum are very amusing. The one depicting the last King of Mann enjoying his dinner was really impressive. There was even a cat sleeping on the bench, and it looked so real. The guide told me that's because he IS real - Goudrum is probably the most famous Manx cat, spending one of his lives as a star of this castle. He couldn't be bothered. What a character. He gets lost sometimes, but people know him so well, they bring him back to the castle.

    This high class cat has obviously chosen the bench by the feast table for his favorite place to have a nap!
    Look at him posing at the official Castle Rushen website:

    Goudrum Zzzzzzzzzz
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    Peel Castle

    by KristaB Updated Jul 17, 2004

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    Peel Castle is one of major historical sights of the Isle of Man. Located on St. Patric's Isle near Peel, even though it is a ruin, it certainly is an impressive one. It used to be the most important religious and secular place throughout Manx history, especially in 6th century during conflicts between Manx Christians and Vikings.

    Unfortunatelly, after the Sovereignty of the English Crown was ensured in 1765, the castle was loosing it's importance and was left to decay.

    After visiting Peel Castle, take a walk to the nearby rocky shore, you'll probably meet some seals. They are actually very interested in observing humans - so they act like tourists just like you do.

    Peel Castle
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    Cregneash Folk Village

    by KristaB Updated Jul 17, 2004

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    The Cregneash village is a living monument which depicts the way people lived here in 19th century. You can observe local customs, crafts and daily life of those times, and you may even see famous Manx cats here.

    This village is also working on preservation of traditional farming practices and skills - horse-drawn farming tools, wood processing, weaving and spinning, blacksmith's work - all for real, with purpose.

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    The Calf of Man

    by KristaB Written Jul 17, 2004

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    This small island is located off the south-western tip of the Isle of Man. It is a home to numerous seabird colonies, and of course there is a bird observatory. Actually, the whole island is a bird sanctuary.

    I sat on a bench talking to my friend for almost two hours - the view is truly woneful, especially if you love the sea, crashing waves, seals, seabirds, ships ...

    Calf of Man
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    Douglas, a capital with a Victorian ambiente

    by christine.j Updated Aug 22, 2008

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    Douglas is the capital of the Isle of Man.
    Arriving by ferry I saw it appear on the horizon, the long row of mostly white houses and the promenade. The promenade was built towards the end of 19th century, in Victorian times. To make getting from one end to the other easier, the horse tram was introduced. ( see transportation tip).

    Today mostly hotels are on this long promenade. I heard it's about 2.5 km from the sea terminal to the electric railway. Even though I don't know if this is the exact distance, it is quite a walk. But a very pleasant one, along the sea and the beach.Just be careful not to step onto the bike lane, as the cyclists seem to appear out of nowhere and are really fast.

    Across the street from the beach, there are flowerbeds and the flowers are often grown to form pictures.

    At the sea terminal end there is the Jubilee Clock, put up in 1887 to celebrate the golden jubilee of Queen Victoria.

    The Jubilee Clock A picture of flowers

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    The Geat Laxey Wheel

    by KristaB Updated Jul 17, 2004

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    Named also "Lady Isabella", after the wife of former governor of the IOM, it is now the largest still functioning wheel of this kind in the world.

    The 22m diameter wheel was designed by Victorian engineer R. Casement and built in 1854 to pump water from the Glen Mooar industrial complex.

    It was purchased from private owners by Manx Government in 1965. and was completely restored, together with the surrounding area. Climb up the steep stairs and enjoy the view over picturesque village and towards the sea.
    Mind your head in certain odd corners - warning signs are well visible.

    Laxey Wheel
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    Castletown:Birdwatching at Scarlett Point

    by christine.j Written Aug 22, 2008

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    From the Market Square there are signs leading to Scarlett Point. This is one of the birdwatchers' points on the Isle of Man and it's easily accessible without a car.It's a walk of about 30 minutes from the town centre, not more.
    There is an information centre, but it was closed on Mondays (which was when we were there), one more reason to go back.
    Sitting on the benches there was great, just watching the tide and the sea and of course the many, many birds there. We saw oystercatchers, knuts, turnstones and even two red-billed choughs, plus about 1000 gulls.

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    • Birdwatching

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    Bradda Head

    by Kristymamoo Written Jul 9, 2007

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    The walk up to Bradda Head is lovely!! Most of the way is a reasonably gentle walk - it just gets a bit steep towards the top but it's worth it when you get there. This is a walk we have done many times because it's easy for the kids and it's also very easy to get to.

    The view is amazing - sadly the photo's don't do it any justice (poor light, dodgy flash, any other excuse I can think of!). When you reach the top you can look back over Port Erin which is a beautiful little seaside town - and home to one of the best beaches on the Island.

    The children really enjoyed climbing to the top of the tower even though the staircase is very very dark. It can also get very windy when you reach Bradda Head which can be amusing - just don't stand too close to the edge, it's a long way down!!

    At a gentle pace it takes around 20 mins to reach the top.

    We're heading all the way up there!! Getting there..... Almost there..... Made it!!!!! Looking back over Port Erin
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    Scarlett

    by Kristymamoo Updated Jul 16, 2007

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    I love it here!! It is one of the most dramatic pieces of coastline on the island.

    Scarlett is an area of extinct volcano in the South of the Island and is well worth a visit just for the "wow" factor. As with many other areas of natural beauty on the Island this is generally very quiet and you quite often find yourself alone here.

    There are also numerous rock-pools here which the kids love to fish in with their nets. Emma visited here with school one day and also found a couple of fossils!

    There is a visitor centre which is open Mon - Sat from 2.00pm till 5.00pm from May to September. Only very small but provides some interesting information on the landscape and the wildlife which can be spotted.

    The ancient capital of Castletown is nearby which is also well worth a visit.

    Related to:
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    • Beaches
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Castletown: Castle Rushen

    by christine.j Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Castletown used to be the capital of the Isle of Man until 1862, something which can easily be believed when you see the huge castle.
    Coming from the train station you turn right and walk towards the harbour, Castle Rushen is right in front of you.This building from the 13th century dominates the small town.
    There is a beautiful garden attached to it, with an old clock next to the entrance, several benches to sit down and rest and a part called the Speaker's Garden. So far I haven't been able to find out what this means, something like Speaker's Corner in Hyde Park maybe?

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    Castletown: Old Grammar School

    by christine.j Written Aug 22, 2008

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    Behind the Market Square there is the old Grammar School, a small, white building close to the sea. It was built as a chapel in 13th century, but from 18th century on has served as a school. In 1930 the last pupils were taught there and the interior has been left as it used to be. Instead of exercise books the pupils wrote on sand, saving a lot of money on school equipment.
    Today it's a museum, entrance is free, with a nice gift shop and a very friendly attendant.

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    Ramsey

    by christine.j Updated Aug 22, 2008

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    Ramsey in the north of the island is the second largest town. It was, however, very quiet when we strolled through the centre on a Sunday afternoon. I saw a tall,blue pillar on a square, with a sort of case locked by a padlock. I've been wondering ever since what this could be. Lately I thought maybe it was a special postbox and I just didn't recognize it as such.
    But apart from this mysterious pillar Ramsey has a very nice beach and a beautiful park.There is a large lake inside the park, a playground next to it and a café. Many people were enjoying their afternoon there.
    On our way to Ramsey we passed through purple meadows, the heather was already blooming and had coloured large areas. Occasionally we could see some white spots, sheep.

    What's inside?

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Isle of Man Hotels

  • Regency Hotel

    Queens Promenade, Douglas, IM2 4NN, United Kingdom

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Families

  • Anchorage Guest House

    Athol Park, Port Erin, United Kingdom

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Couples

  • Sefton Express

    Stayed here with grown-up family and it met our needs perfectly. Easy walk to airport and only 20...

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Isle of Man Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Isle of Man things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Isle of Man sightseeing.
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