Matera Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Matera

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    Admiring the place

    by shavy Written Feb 13, 2014

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    Keep on walking through seems endless, so many to see. Many of the palaces abandoned and some still in used

    There are small houses used for shops and restaurants. And some of the residentials are open for public, with entrance fee

    I can't imagine people lives here in such a very small hole inside the stone
    Nowadays Matera is famous spot for the local Italian
    But less outsider tourist

    Those are houses on the top
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    More to see around

    by shavy Written Feb 13, 2014

    The overwhelming beauty of rock home town would basically even put the most picturesque Italian towns
    A unique experience for those visiting the city for the first time, an astonishing surprise implies

    Walking through like in labyrinth, the ancient houses, these quarters cherish the traces of the past and of the events that took place in this city

    Matera has a charming aspect, it leaves its visitors without words, because it seems to be out of time
    The fact that this city maintains unspoiled its history and its appearance from 2000 years just means that people who settled this beautiful place

    The rocky houses
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    Wandering in Matera

    by shavy Written Feb 13, 2014

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    It does not surprise me that most ancient dwellings owned by above-average-earning professionals, They seem to be restored, with no expense or effort was spared.
    Fully rocks stone dwellings in soft colors densely pressed against the steep rock walls.

    There are two paths through the Sassi linking the two original parts of Matera and that should take care of the transportation of goods by road and a modern water supply and sewerage system below.

    And because there are only two streets, it is still necessary for residents of the upper housing groceries and goods through the stone steps down the road to pick up, though, the presence of porters and other service this inconvenience a lot lighter

    One of the steeps
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    Basilica

    by shavy Written Feb 13, 2014

    On the top of the hill of the city is the Cathedral which offers an amazing view of the Sasso Barisano

    The exterior presents a rose window with 16 small columns, and the bell tower it’s in Apulian-Romanesque style

    The interior is composed of a nave and two aisles with a Latin cross plan, and houses exemplar works of baroque art.

    Of course the city of Matera can be seen in its entirety as a monument, a place that has been carved over an area of ​​several square kilometers

    The church is the only one that has shape retention

    Very nice chuch standing between the rocky houses
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  • Museum of Torture

    by katehb Updated Jun 2, 2012

    We happened across this small museum quite by accident when visiting Matera whilst on holiday in Southern Italy. We had with us our 2 youngest children, at that time at a difficult age, too young to be left in England alone, but not really wanting to be going to Mum and Dadish type places. This museum was a revelation and opened all our eyes to just what people did in the past and are still doing now, to each other. All exhibits have descriptions of how they were used, what countries used them and whether they are still used - all parts of the world are featured. Don't be put off, give it a go and you will learn something. It isn't suitable for younger children though.

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    Sasso Caveoso

    by Maria81 Updated Aug 23, 2011

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    Where?

    Although you can't really see it when you're on top of the Cathedral hill, it would have been to your left - opposite the Sasso Barisano - if you were looking from the observation spot by the Cathedral itself.

    What?

    The other of the great ravines is filled by Sasso Caveoso. Conceptually just like Sasso Barisano - a maze of narrow streets and houses - Sasso Caveoso has not been restored to anywhere near the same degree. In fact, we frequently saw building and reconstruction works going on in our wanders throughout this Sasso.

    There are a number of interesting churches in the area, some dating back to as far as the 12th century, as well as the usual complement of hotels, museums, and eateries (even if in slightly smaller numbers than in Sasso Barisano).

    Sasso Caveoso is also the starting point for the Gravina di Matera hikes, taking in a number of cave churches surrounding the area.

    Sasso Caveoso
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    Sasso Barisano

    by Maria81 Written Aug 21, 2011

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    Where?

    In one of the 2 valleys - and right below you, if you're looking down from the Cathedral square - along Via Fiorentini.

    What?

    The larger - and the better restored - of two sassi, with many cave houses now converted into museums, shops and restaurants. Our own hotel - the Sextantio - is part of the Sasso Barisano. There are also several Rupestrian churches.

    While the sasso is, at first glance, simply a maze and is impossible to navigate, it's surprisingly easy and well marked, with tourist walking trails highlighted as you wander around. That said, just wandering around is not a bad idea in itself!

    Looking Down at Sasso Barisano at Night
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    Church of San Domenico

    by xaver Updated May 29, 2007

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    The Church of San Domenico is a religious place, extremely changed by time and works of renovation, which could not conceal its Romanic features on the façade.
    The church combines Romanesque and baroque elements and contains works of art of the 16 century.
    I must admitt this is the church I liked more as it is very simple but at the same time it is now in the most modern part of the city.

    San domenico
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    Torture museum

    by xaver Updated May 24, 2007

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    My favourite thing about Matera is that city definitly offers to you much more than you expect.It's in the deep south of Italy usually known as the less safe area of the country and you find an incredibly safe and quiet town, it's incredibly clean for the southern Italy standards and still there are not so many tourists around.Then you see there is a torture museum which is not advertised in the travel books it doesn't even have a web site, you go and you find out this is the museum that in Europe collects the bigger number of torture tools.The museum is not so big, just 3 rooms but the tools are well mainained and the visit, after you read what those tools were used to and where they are still used, does not leave you indifferent.

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    Vittorio Veneto square

    by xaver Written May 24, 2007

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    This is the main square of the city, in the area only resident can use cars so it's easy to walk around and cross streets without any problem and you can enjoy an icecream sitting outside without breathing the car gas.From this square you also have a great look on sasso barisano and you can see some part of the undergorund town with several cisterns up to 15 meters big used to keep the rain water, practically another city under the city.

    Piazza Vittorio Veneto underground city
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    Sasso barisano

    by xaver Updated May 24, 2007

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    This is the smaller "sasso", the origin of its name is not sure but it probably derives from the fact that this area is oriented to the city of Bari.
    It lays on north west of civita but you can have a look on it from Piazza Vittorio Veneto even if you will get the best panorama on Sasso Barisano from the Duomo square which, for me, should be the sart of your visit of Sassi, infact going down to Sasso Barisano. from duomo square you will be able to start an easy itinerary that will bring you, at the end, into the earth of the bigger and more popular Sasso caveoso.
    During this walk you will meet on your way the church of San Pietro Barisano, the Church of San Agostino and the Santa Maria delle malve with its beautiful frescos.

    Sasso Barisano Sasso Barisano Sasso Barisano Sasso Barisano Sasso Barisano
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    Gravina and Murgia

    by xaver Written May 24, 2007

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    Gravina is a deep ravine, a canyon some kilometrs long passed through by a river.Matera developed all along the cliffs of the Gravina creating the wide urban area of sassi and civita.
    During the medioevo many rock churches have been built all along the Gravina some still preserve their frescos, some look just like caves.
    Murgia is a mesa that goes from puglia region until Matera and the caves in this area witness the human presence since prehistorical age.
    Following the itinerary I mentioned in the sasso caveoso and sasso barisano tip you will be able to walk just along one side of the canyon that gives you some really breathtaking views of nature, grottos and rock churches.

    Murgia Gravina Gravina Gravina Murgia
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    Casa grotta

    by xaver Written May 23, 2007

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    The casa grotta which literelally means home cave is one of the best way to have an idea of how people lived in this town untill 1950 when the sassi got abandoned for healthy reasons.
    The casa Grotta I am talking about is the one of Casalnuovo(there are 2 and this is the one less visited by tourists as more difficult to reach).
    In the casa grotta you will find the rooms a typical home were made of:the kitchen the bedroom, the stable, the cellar and in each area you will be shown the original toys used for the daily activities.Particulary interesting is the water cistern where people used to store the rain water as that area was not served by any aqueduct.That made me think of how clever we are in wasting that natural resource.
    The ticket to visit the casa costs 1,50€ and inside there is an audio system which shows you the house in italian, french, english, german and japanise.

    casa grotta casa grotta Cellar cistern grill
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    Church of santa Maria de Idris

    by xaver Written May 23, 2007

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    This is probably the tougher walk inside Sasso Caveoso but it's definitly worth both for the church and for the view you get once you arrive.
    The church was completely carved into the calcareous rocks and you can see frescoes on the walls. The name Idris derives from the Greek Odigitria, patron of water or guide of the way. The interior still contains paintings dating from the 17th century.
    This church is part of the rock churches tour, you can buy singgle tiket to visit one church(2,50€) a tiket to visit 3 of them(5€) and one to visit all the 5 churches which is 10 euros.
    I'd reccomend to visit this one, Santa Lucia delle Malve and Convicinio San Antonio.

    Rock church Rock church view of Santa Maria Idris
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    Sasso Caveoso

    by xaver Written May 23, 2007

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    It is the more popular Sasso, it lays on the southern part of the town and you get a great view of this area from Pascoli square.
    Following the itinerary I suggested from sasso Barisano and walking along the main road you will end up in Piazza San Pietro Caveoso with its church and from there you just have to climb the many steps up and down the area to discover all the corners which it has to offer.In this area you will also find the "chiese rupestri" that are some churches built inside some caves where you can still find some well maintained frescos.

    sasso caveoso sasso caveoso sasso caveoso sasso caveoso sasso caveoso
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Matera Things to Do

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