Caserta Things to Do

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    by suhadis
  • Things to Do
    by suhadis
  • Things to Do
    by suhadis

Best Rated Things to Do in Caserta

  • unravelau's Profile Photo

    The avenue of statues is a must see in my opinion

    by unravelau Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Avenue of statues at Caserta

    From the palace to the last fountain the roadway is straight . Fountains, pools, statues and various other sculptures around little stairways lead you up to the next level. When you reach the end of these, the roadway broadens and forms a semi-circular avenue marked by a wall (decorated with these statues). It is a very beautiful sight. Google links the Palace to an episode of star trek or star wars (if I remember correctly).

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    • Adventure Travel

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  • suhadis's Profile Photo

    Reggia di Caserta: Pt 4 Gardens Walk Stage 2

    by suhadis Written Oct 7, 2006

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    In this second stage of the walk you will first see a large flat pool, with live fishes in them, they look like carps..

    At the end there is a nice large fountain with many statues. There wasn't any water spouting from the statues at that time, but the poses of the statues really define the scene to be quite like a great painting. Unfortunately the front of the fountain was barricaded so you can't get close to the waters..

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  • suhadis's Profile Photo

    Reggia di Caserta: Pt 4 Gardens Walk- At the end

    by suhadis Written Oct 7, 2006

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    At the end of this walk, you will come to a spectacular fountain with sculpture works by Paolo Persico, Angelo Brunelli and Pietro Solari, depicting the mythilogical episode of Diana and Actaeon, with the spectacular man made water fountain as the backdrop.

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  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    La Reggia - Staircase

    by Polly74 Written Dec 3, 2004

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    The staircase

    The majestic main staircase, whose 116 steps were all carved from one gigantic block of stone, is a perfect combination of rich marbles and dramatic perspectives. It leads to the splendiferous 25 rooms of the royal apartments.
    In the ceiling there was a space for musicians who started to play music as soon as the king entered the Reggia.

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    La Reggia - Body Guards Hall

    by Polly74 Written Dec 3, 2004

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    Alessandro Farnese statue

    The second antechamber, of the Guards of the Body, is the richest one with its putties: groups of putti helding flags.
    Doors and windows are surmounted from panels representing historical episodes of the antiquity happened in the kingsdome.

    Of forehead to the windows there's a marble sculpture representing Alexander Farnese crown from the Victory.

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  • suhadis's Profile Photo

    Reggia di Caserta: Part 1 First Impressions

    by suhadis Written Oct 7, 2006

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    When you first visit this palace, you will only not see the "grandness" of the scale of the palace. The palace building looks basically just a longish rectagular complex from the front. I think maybe it's because during my visit, there was some construction for the gardens going on for the front of the palace, which is typical for any palace to have in the front for people to get a sense of size when approaching it. There was an alternate route along the main roads to get to the castle. I think when the construction is completed, you can access directly for the main train station there.

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  • suhadis's Profile Photo

    Reggia di Caserta: Part 2 Initial Orientation

    by suhadis Updated Oct 7, 2006

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    To the castle rooms
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    The Entrance to the castle leads to a long corridor along the complex and straight to the gardens at the back (you won't notice this until you walk to the end!). The ticket counter is here, and they have different tickets (for the palace rooms, the gardens, or both). Somewhere along midway on the left is the entrance to the castle's rooms.

    Coming back on the topic of the gardens! If you get to the end of the corridor, your eyes will only see the end of this immensely long water park, which looks like it doesn't end. At the end somewhat you could make out a waterfall like thing at the hill in the background. Refer to pic 5, but pictures cannot express the feeling of it being there..

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  • suhadis's Profile Photo

    Reggia di Caserta: Pt 4 Gardens Walk Stage 1

    by suhadis Updated Oct 7, 2006

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    Follow me on the long Gardens walk at Reggia di Caserta!.. It's actually long walk on foot ~40 mins +++, but you're having this comfort from your PC! This is 1st stage on of the walk, which starts from the castle complex to the first roundabout. In this stage, there are no fountains, just a large flat area of grass.

    If you're there, i think there are other options to get to the end of the gardens like the bus and also the horse carriage.

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    Reggia di Caserta: Pt 4 Gardens Walk Stage 3

    by suhadis Written Oct 7, 2006

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    In this stage, you can see cascading pools of water from nearly the back of the gardens. Each pool there are large carp-like fishes. It's refreshing to hear the water gushing from one pool to the next. The gradient of the land starts to slope up.

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  • gmg61's Profile Photo

    Reggia di Caserta

    by gmg61 Written Sep 26, 2006

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    One of the fountains
    1 more image

    Reggia = Royal Palace.
    This is an impressing building, built for the kings of the Bourbon dinasty who ruled over Naples. You can visit the rooms, and it's an interesting tour or just stroll along the huge and beautiful garden. Just walk there or bike, or rent one of the many horse carriages, or just jump on a bus. The garden is beautiful, and there are water polls and fountains, all in Baroque style. On the top of the path a nice "English garden" is the right end for a nice walk.
    The walk is about 3 Km and there isn't much shade. So have plentu of water. Bars are available at the beginning and at the end of the path.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • iNorv9's Profile Photo

    La Reggia di Caserta: Versailles a la Italiana

    by iNorv9 Written Feb 17, 2006

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    View of the central promenade
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    Located 40 mintues by train to the north of Naples, King Charles III of Naples commissioned the building of the Reggia di Caserta in 1752 to rival Versailles. In terms of sheer scale, the architects definitely succeeded. The palace itself is an immense structure, from which a large pathway leads 3.5 km past a series of fountains and sculptures to a majestic waterfall, which some of you may recognize as the setting for the final scene in the original 1977 Star Wars. I consider myself a pretty fast walker, however the journey from palace to waterfall took me a good 35 minutes, allowing for the occaisional photo op. That said, for the less physically inclined there is a bus service that goes at regular intervals around the grounds.

    Getting there: Trains leave about every half hour from Naples Piazza Garibaldi station. The journey takes about 40 minutes. Transportation covered by Artecard.

    Bottom-line: The vast size of the grounds makes landscaping difficult, and much of greenery seems a bit scruffy. Nevertheless, the view from atop the water fall looking down on the palace grounds is extraordinary.

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  • woef's Profile Photo

    The royal palace

    by woef Written Mar 13, 2004

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    caserta

    The Royal Palace was begun in 1752 by Vanvitelli for the bourbon King Charles III.
    The 82 metres high waterfall at the end of the park is really impressive. The water is coming from a special aquaduct. If you are to tired to walk back to the castle it's always possible to go by bus. Don' forget to visit the park at the right end. It has a lot of tropical vegetation , most of it imported.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Reggia di Caserta - The Park

    by stephenshephard Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Waterfalls and fountains, Caserta Palace Park

    The Caserta Palace garden is now a park. Its main feature is an enormous series of fountains leading to an 82 metre high waterfall fed by a specially built aqueduct. It is a very long walk from the palace to the waterfall, so you might want to take the bus back that goes up and down the park.

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  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    La Reggia - Mars Room

    by Polly74 Written Dec 3, 2004

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    Mars Room

    One of the first room, known as Mars room, is in style empire. It was planned by Antonio De Simone under the reign of Gioacchino Murat; the decorations are neoclassical style and exalt the military virtues

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    La Reggia - The Throne Room

    by Polly74 Written Dec 3, 2004

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    The Throne Room

    The Throne Room is the largest room in the real Apartments. For approximately a century it remained without decorations, neglected both from the French kings and from Ferdinand IV when it returned after the Restoration.

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Caserta Things to Do

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