Naples Off The Beaten Path

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Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Naples

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    Neapolis Station – Archaeological Yards

    by egicom05 Written Jun 12, 2005

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    Archaelogical discoveries in Naples Metro
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    If you are looking for a suggestive way through hundreds of years of history, you can find it in a new part of National Archaeological Museum. This section of the museum is placed in a wide show-room (free entrance) at the exit “Via Foria” within the Tube “Museo” station (Linea 1).
    We try to be your virtual guide.
    During the excavations for the new Metro Station, parts of the old city were discovered. They date back to the Neolithic Age until the Middle Age.
    A prehistoric discovery is a ploughed field. At the entrance of the museum there is a reconstruction of the original field. This archaeological find has survived years thanks to the muddiness of the soil.
    Going forward trough the centuries, you find the Greek city. During the excavation, several fragments of vases of the VII and VI b.C. have been found. They are now placed inside a big and suggestive casket in the centre of the show-room. These vases testify the presence of handcraft workshop along the coast. These discoveries brought to light the line of the ancient harbour, the centre of the Mediterranean trade.
    Roman elements are three boats that were used for trading and fishing, ruins of a temple that was used for the Isolympic Games (founded by Augustus), marble slabs that show the names of winners and a wonderful statue of the flying Goddess of Victory (the “Nike”).
    The three boats are in an excellent state of preservation. After restoration, one of them will be exposed in a casket in the new metro-station. Several video displays are placed in the show-room to show the excavation phases and to explain the different techniques which have been used to preserve the findings.
    A decorative fountain, which date back to the XIII a.C., has been found in a garden. On this fountain there is a design of a ship in procession towards the city, which is depicted as a bastion with towers. A plastic model is shown in the museum.
    [Egicom05 – Dreaming Naples]

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    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    Rione Terra - Pozzuoli

    by egicom05 Written Jun 12, 2005

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    Thermae in Rione Terra

    Dated back to the II century b.C., Rione Terra was opened one year ago but it’s still not well known. The excavations brought out to light new parts of the old Puteoli Acropolis (33 meters above the sea). Here you can take a walk through the streets of the old Metropolis, which was, during Roman Age, the only trading centre of Western Mediterranean sea. Rione Terra is an exceptional civilization cradle of all ages, englobed in the foundations of the XV century a.C., rebuilt after several earthquakes.
    The sensation you feel when you enter in the old town walls is to live again the everyday life of 2000 years ago.
    The city planning is the same of Roman age with the two main road axes (Cardi and Decumani). Walking through these streets you can find small ancient shops and above them you can see where once there were the houses of the shops’ owners. Going down a spiral stairway you’ll find yourself in the basements where you can see the shops’ storage once used to keep the wheat. Also, you’ll find some small rooms with stone beds which at the beginning were used as jails and later as gladiators’ shelters. In one of the rooms you can see some gladiators paintings and a verse of a Catullo’s poem that makes wonder this place of a brothel. Walking in these basements you feel to be in a maze. On the same level, there is a private altar, with wonderful mosaics, where were celebrated animal sacrifices.
    To visit Rione Terra you walk on bridges totally realized in glass to make the areas below visible. To visit Rione Terra we suggest to wear a pullover or a jacket as for the fresh and humid temperature inside. We also suggest to reserve a conducted tour to recreate the atmosphere that the place excites.
    ADDRESS: Largo Sedile di Porto, Pozzuoli (Napoli); DIRECTIONS: By Tube: line 2, By car: “Tangenziale di Napoli” exit Pozzuoli – Via Campana
    OPENING HOURS
    Saturday and Sunday from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.; the box-office closes at 6.30.
    TICKET: € 3,00. Included in “Campania Artecard”
    [Egicom05 - by Dreaming Naples]

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    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Cava de tirreni

    by ruki Written Sep 21, 2007

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    This small charming place is about 30 minutes from Naples. It is in the mountain and it has very good domestic atmosphere on the streets and squares. It is local place and there aren't many tourist all around like in the Naples. There you will expire the real Italian pastas and it is very cheap.

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    Capri

    by ruki Written Oct 16, 2005

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    From Naples, it is a short trip over to the fabled island of Capri - playground of the rich and famous. You can reach the island by hydrofoil or by ferry. On arrival at the dock, you can ride a tramway up to the small town of Capri. The famous Piazzetta square in the center of town is a good place to shop or enjoy a drink. A walking tour of the town enables you to view the magnificent garden terraces, and historic churches and villas. Very near the town of Capri is another small village called Anacapri where you can take a chair lift to the top of one of the highest peaks on the island and enjoy a breathtaking view of the Bay of Naples.

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    • Beaches

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    Sorrento

    by ruki Updated Oct 16, 2005

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    Sorrento is situated on a plain above the sea, overlooking the Bay of Naples. The view from Sorrento stretches back to the north, encompassing Vesuvius, the city of Naples, and the island of Ischia. The town is exceedingly popular with tourists, particularly the British - indeed, English appears at times to be Sorrento's first language. It has a pretty old town, a harbour with ferry departures to Capri, Amalfi and Naples, and is within easy reach of the Amalfi Coast, Pompei, Herculaneum and the city of Naples. There is some good walking in the peninsula, and plenty of restaurants and bars for the less energetic.

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    Pompeii

    by ruki Written Oct 16, 2005

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    In close proximity to Naples are the famous ruins of Pompeii, the once thriving town for wealthy Romans that was destroyed in the cataclysmic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. Many consider Pompeii to be the most important archeological site anywhere in the world. The ruins provide fascinating insights into the lives of the ancient Romans, and include numerous villas, temples, theaters, baths, shops,amphitheatres,residential houses and unique wall paintings, mosaics and statues.

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    • Historical Travel

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    Herculaneum

    by ruki Written Oct 16, 2005

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    Herculaneum was a smaller town close to the city of Pompeii. Its main industry was fishing. When Vesuvius erupted in August of 79 AD, Herculaneum was buried under nearly 60 feet of superhot mud. When the mud cooled, it set nearly as hard as concrete. This makes excavations very difficult, but scientists continue their work to learn about the people and the town of Herculaneum.

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    Herculaneum

    by toonsarah Written Nov 25, 2007

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    Street in Herculaneum
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    I’ve made a separate page about Herculaneum, or Ercolano as it’s known in Italian, so this is just a brief outline of why you might want to go there.

    When Vesuvius erupted in AD 79 Herculaneum was buried in volcanic mud rather than in the lava which engulfed it perhaps more famous neighbour, Pompeii. It lay hidden and nearly intact for more than 1600 years until it was accidentally discovered by some workers digging a well in 1709. This has resulted in a different type of preservation of its ruins, with the mud doing relatively little damage to the buildings, instead slowly filling them from the bottom up.

    Herculaneum was a smaller town with a wealthier population than Pompeii at the time of its destruction. You can easily imagine that the seaside villas would have been very desirable residences, and the lifestyle of those who occupied them would have been wonderful – sipping wine on the terraces overlooking the bay, with slaves catering to your every need, beautiful mosaics and friezes adorning the walls, a pleasant climate away from the hassles of the city. I loved wandering around envisaging all this – but then also contemplating the terror that must have descended on this peaceful spot when the inhabitants suddenly realised the enormity of what was happening to the mountain that looms over it. Many had sufficient warning that they were able to escape; some however did not, and their skeletons were found by archaeologists huddled together in boat houses on what would have in those days been the beach.

    See my Transportation tips about the Circumvesuviana train to Herculaneum, and my separate page for lots of details about the various sights.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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    Pompeii

    by toonsarah Written Nov 25, 2007

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    Crouching figure of victim, Forum Granary, Pompeii
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    I’ve made a separate page about Pompeii, so this is just a brief outline of why you might want to go there.

    Perhaps the first thing that struck me about Pompeii was its size. We’d already been to Herculaneum, and I knew Pompeii was bigger, but hadn’t realised quite how big it is. The ruins cover an area the size of a largish modern village, and to see everything properly would demand a full day, which we didn’t have. Rather than rush around madly, therefore, it’s best to choose some buildings that appeal and see those properly.

    As Pompeii was a larger and more substantial city than Herculaneum, it has more in the way of grand buildings such as temples, and these make a good place to start your explorations as they’re near the entrance and also command great views of Vesuvius beyond, making it easy to imagine your way back into history and the dreadful day in AD79 when the city was engulfed by pumice and ash. We were also fascinated, as I think every visitor must be, by the plaster casts of people trapped as they tried to flee. In addition there are grand villas and humble shops, extensive bath-house complexes, theatres and small restaurants – everything that the population would have needed for a comfortable existence in this busy town. A day spent here is a wonderful way to absorb yourself in a past lifestyle that at times seems so very like the present.

    See my Transportation tips about the Circumvesuviana train to Pompeii, and my separate page for lots of details about the various sights.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    The legend of Gesù Nuovo palace

    by egicom05 Written Jun 9, 2005

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    Symbols on Ges�� Nuovo Facade

    The Gesù Nuovo church is surrounded by a legend connected with the diamond carved stones of lava (piperno stones) used to cover the front side. These stones were worked by "Maestri Pipernieri" (piperno workers masters) a secret guild, that handed on the art of carving since the ancient romans carvers. On every stone of the church, each maestro “piperniere” engraved a sign (those signs can even be seen today). The meaning of these signs is still unknown but some experienced professor in ancient alchemy found a strong likeness with esoteric symbol. According to the legend, every inhabitant of the buildng (that was built in 1470 as a private palace of Sanseverino prince, and only in 1584 became a church ) is destined to be driven out. The first owner, Antonello Sanseverino, was obliged to leave the palace by the aragona's ambassador; the second, Ferrante Sanseverino was driven out by the king Filippo II in 1580. Filippo II sold the building to Gesuiti priests, but in 1767 they were driven out and the church was presented to the order of Francescani monks. In 1821 the Francescani had to go away and let the Gesuiti go back in. Neapolitans are waiting for a new change of owner...

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Sorrento

    by toonsarah Written Nov 25, 2007

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    Above the Marina Grande, Sorrento
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    I’ve made a separate page about Sorrento, so this is just a brief outline of why you might want to go there.

    A sunny Saturday in early November turned out to be a perfect time to visit – even then this lovely seaside town was pretty busy and I can imagine that in the height of the season it might become unpleasantly so. As it was we had a lovely time strolling the streets, and in particularly walking down to the Marina Grande, the less touristy (and, despite its name, the smaller) of the two harbours. Here we could sit in the sun at a small, unpretentious restaurant, the Ristorante di Leva with a chilled white wine, some grilled sardines and a fresh tomato salad, watching a few local fishermen passing the time of day. We also enjoyed an ice cream in the main square, the Piazza Tasso, shopping for local delicacies such as lemon biscuits and olive oil, and photographing the many interesting little details of its buildings.

    See my Transportation tips about the Circumvesuviana train to Sorrento, and my separate page for information about the various sights, cafés etc.

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    The Villa Comunale

    by ruki Written Sep 17, 2007

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    The Villa Comunale is the most prominent and visible park in Naples and southern Italy. It was built in the 1780s by King Ferdinand IV (later known as Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies) on land reclaimed along the coast between the main body of the city and the small port of Mergellina. The park was originally a "Royal Garden", reserved for members of the royal family, but open to the public on special holidays such as the Festival of Piedigrotta

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    • Castles and Palaces

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    Sant'Elmo

    by ruki Written Sep 17, 2007

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    Sant'Elmo is the name of both a hill and a beautiful fortress in Naples, which is located near the Certosa di San Martino. Together, the structures overlook Naples and they are the most visible landmarks in the city. The name "Sant'Elmo" is from an old 10th-century church.

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    • Castles and Palaces

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    Castel Capuano

    by ruki Written Sep 17, 2007

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    Castel Capuano is a castle in Naples, southern Italy. It takes its name from the fact that it was at that point in the city walls where the road led out to the city of Capua. The castle is at the east end of via dei Tribunali and until recently housed the Naples Hall of Justice, which has now moved to the new Civic Center, the Centro Direzionale

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    • Castles and Palaces

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    Pozzuoli - Seafaring Village

    by egicom05 Written Jun 15, 2005

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    Pozzuoli Seafaring Village

    Placed in the gulf of Pozzuoli (north of Naples), this village is typical for its alleys that give it the typical configuration of harbour and, above all, for the lights of the lampares (nightly lamps used for capturing tattleres and polyps), set on the boats of the fishermen.
    The “village” is a charmant match between the port - where are rided at anchor ferries and hydrofoils which get to the islands of Ischia and Procida - and the refuge, situated near the "dock", where private boats are moored and also where fishermen mend their nets and prepare the necessary ones for the fishing.
    The fished is then cleverly cooked by the nearby restaurateurs: a perfect binomial between the fruit of the job and the pleasure of the table. The gulf of Pozzuoli is famous for the preparation of typical dishes of sea: spaghetti with local clams; soup of clams and mussels; fried seaweeds; salads of polyps and so many other, that exhale in the alleys their marvellous perfume of sea; Everything is accompanied with typical local wines like Falanghina and Piedirosso. This last is so called because its color remembers legs of the pigeons: in Neapolitan dialect, it is called "pere’ ‘e palummo" (=legs of pigeon).
    To the folklore of the seafaring village is tied up the Feast of the Yard Sea, on August 15th, the same day of Virgin Mary’s feast: this occasion melts sacred rituals, as the procession, with other profane ones, as the conquest of the yard, a sort of greasy pole soaped that sticks out on the sea.
    Fishermen involve the tourists to the discovery of the village through nice activities of collective fishing on board of the typical boats (“chianchiole” and “paranze”). In some special occasions (and during the month of May) historical center, turns into a banquet where typical products can be tasted.
    [Egicom05 - by Amaltea]
    Highways: Tangenziale - exit Pozzuoli and follow indications to city center
    Railroad: Subway Garibaldi square-Pozzuoli. Stop at Pozzuoli Or Cumana Montesanto–Pozzuoli

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    • Fishing

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