Castel Nuovo - Maschio Angioino, Naples

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  • Castel Nuovo - Maschio Angioino
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Castel Nuovo - Maschio Angioino
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Castel Nuovo
    Castel Nuovo
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    The Castel Nuovo Was First Built in 1279-83

    by hquittner Updated Feb 8, 2014

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    Main Facade
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    The Castejl Nuovo is surrounded by five round towers originally built by Charles I of Anjou between 1279-83.In the next centuries they were rebuilt until in 1453-67 Sagrera finally finished them along with the triumphal arch and the castle rooms. Across the road are two equestrian sets of statues in bronze.

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    The Inner Courtyard Before Going In the Castle

    by hquittner Written Feb 7, 2014
    Santa Barabara Chapel Entrance
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    In the inner courtyard of the Castel Nuovo is the entry to the Palatine Chapel of Santa Barbara. Above its entry door is a fine example of a Madonna by Laurana, the Croatian sculptor, one of many who worked on the Arch. To the left of this is abrade set of stairs tha lead to the main floor where there is the Baron's large hall.

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    The Triumphal Arch Shows Three Levels of Sculpture

    by hquittner Written Feb 4, 2014
    Sea Gods and Virtues Below
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    The triumphal arch exhibits three levels of figures. The upper sculpture is of St. Michael. Severral different figures occupy the middle level, firstly two sea Gods and further out Allegories of the Four Virtues. The lowest level contains Alfonso's triumphs and displays of his wisdom.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Castel Nuovo

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Oct 5, 2012

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    Castel Nuovo
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    Castel Nuovo ("New Castle"), often called Maschio Angioino, is a medieval castle. It is the main symbol of the architecture of the city, and has been expanded or renovated several times since it was first begun in 1279.
    The castle was occupied several times even by the Russian fleet led by Dmitry Seniavin in 1805.
    The last restoration of Castel Nuovo occurred in 1823.

    You can watch my 4 min 52 sec Video Naples part 2 out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

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    Castel Nuovo

    by MM212 Updated Mar 23, 2010

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    Towers of Castel Nuovo - May 09
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    When Carlo d'Angiò became king and moved the capital from Palermo to Napoli, he commissioned the construction of Castel Nuovo. It was named "New Castle" to distinguish it from two older castles in Naples that were too small to hold the Angevin court. Castel Nuovo was completed in 1282, but the only surviving element from that period is a chapel (Cappella Palatina) within. The rest of the castle was rebuilt and enlarged over the following few centuries by successive rulers through the 18th century. During the latter part of this period, its defensive importance waned, but it continued to serve at times as a royal residence. The interior is thus filled with lavish halls befitting of kings. One of the more interesting features in its exterior architecture is the Renaissance-period triumphal arch wedged between two of the five rounded towers of the castle. Considered a jewel of early Renaissance architecture, this arco di trionfo was built in 1443 by King Alfonso I to commemorate his triumphal entry into Naples. The castle is nowadays open to the public as a museum.

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  • nyonnetti's Profile Photo

    Castel Nuovo

    by nyonnetti Written Apr 17, 2008

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    This was such a great place to see. It as built in 1282 and stands with such magnificence as it overlooks the harbor and all it's cruise ships. We did not pay to get in for the tour, but we were able to get in enough to see the courtyard of the castle. We sat outside the castle enjoying the beautiful day and the the lovely garden areas around it.

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    Castel Nuovo

    by filip007 Updated Apr 6, 2008

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    Castel Nuovo

    Imposing sight over the port, Castel Nuovo was built by the Angevin kings of Naples in the space of 3 years, by converting a former franciscan convent. It was here that the king resided.

    The two story white triumphal arch celebrates another changing of dynasty - this time the Aragonese - the triumphal entry of Alfonso I of Aragon to Naples in 1443.

    Today, you will find there Museo Civico with collection of frescoes, sculptures and paintings.

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    Castel Nuovo: Don't miss the skeletons!

    by wilocrek Written Jan 11, 2008

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    Looks a bit forbidding...kind of like Disneyland.

    Castel Nuovo is located directly on the harbor not far from Piazza de Plebiscito. This is a neat place to visit from both a historical standpoint as well as from a great view standpoint. The Castle itself is rich with a history that quite frankly I already forgot about so consult a guidebook, but there is a room inside that has a glass floor showing the catacombs with several fully visible skeletons! I want a floor like that in my house someday....any volunteers for the skeleton role? Castel Nuovo also boasts some of best views of Naples harbor from the top part of the Castle. Visiting here serves as a great side dish to visiting Piazza de Plebiscito and the National Museum. All three can easily be done in a day.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Castel Nuovo

    by toonsarah Written Nov 25, 2007

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    Castel Nuovo, Naples - the
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    As Newcastle fans we can never resist pausing to check out any other “new castle” we come across, and here is Naples’ example. The Castel Nuovo was built by Charles I of Anjou in 1279-1282 to house his court, which he moved here from the former capital, Palermo. The castle remained a royal residence for about 200 years, during which time several historic events took place here, for example the election of Pope Boniface VIII. After the late 15th century it became more of a fortress than a residence, and now houses the Museo Civico (silver and bronze artefacts, and paintings depicting Neapolitan history), the Palatine Chapel (all that remains of the original 13th century structure) and the Hall of Barons.

    I confess we didn’t bother with any of these so I can’t comment on them, but we did stop long enough to admire the Arco di Trionfo, between the two entrance towers, which is considered the most important Renaissance work in Naples. This arch, completed in 1468, commemorates the return to the city of Alfonso I of Aragon and Naples in 1443.

    The last restoration was in 1823, and today the castle serves as the home of the city government.

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  • Santini738's Profile Photo

    Castel Nuovo (Maschio Angioino)

    by Santini738 Written Jul 13, 2007

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    Castel Nuovo

    Castel Nuovo, often called Maschio Angioino, is a castle in the city of Naples, southern Italy. It is the main symbol of the architecture of the city.

    Before the accession of Charles I of Anjou to the throne in 1266, the capital of the Kingdom of Naples was Palermo. There was a royal residence in Naples, at the Castel Capuano. However, when the capital was moved to Naples, Charles ordered a new castle, not far from the sea, built to house the court.

    Works, directed by French architects, began in 1279 and were completed three years later. Due to the events of the Sicilian Vespers, the new fortress remained uninhabited until 1285, when Charles died and was succeeded by his son, Charles II. Castel Nuovo became soon the nucleus of the historical center of the city, and was often the site of famous events. For example, on December 13, 1294, Pope Celestine V resigned as pope in a hall of the castle. Eleven days later, Boniface VIII was elected pope here by the cardinal collegium and immediately moved to Rome to avoid the Angevine authority.

    Under king Robert (reigned from 1309), the castle was enlarged and embellished, becoming a centre of patronage of art. In 1347 Castel Nuovo was sacked by the army of Louis I of Hungary, and had to be heavily restored after the return of queen Joanna I. The new works permitted the queen to resist the Hungarian siege during Louis' second expedition. The castle was besieged numerous times in the following years, and was the official residence of King Ladislas from 1399. It decayed under his sister Joanna II.

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  • rsleisk's Profile Photo

    Castle Nuovo

    by rsleisk Written Jun 5, 2007

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    Castel Nuovo (Italian: "New Castle"), often called Maschio Angioino, was began in 1279 and finished in 1282 and remained uninhabited until 1285, when Charles died and was succeeded by his son, Charles II. Castel Nuovo became soon the nucleus of the historical center of the city, and was often the site of famous events.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Maschio Angioino

    by mvtouring Written Oct 26, 2005

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    Built on the former site of a Franciscan convent dedicated to Santa Maria La Nova, this medieval fortress is better known to locals as Maschio Angioino (the Angevin Keep), after Charles I of Anjou who commissioned it. The castle's Palatine Chapel, also known as the Santa Barbara Chapel, remains a splendid example of Gothic art from the Angevin period. Today, the local council meets in the Sala dei Baroni (reached by an external staircase) and the eastern wing is home to the Museo Civico (local art gallery and museum). Admission to the museum is about EUR6.

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  • spicysurfer's Profile Photo

    Maschio Angioino Castle

    by spicysurfer Written Oct 3, 2005
    The excavations under the castle

    In the middle of the town there is the Maschio (or Mastio, sorry...) Angioino Castle. From the top of the castle you can view all the town and even the island of the gulf, and you can take great pictures. Around the castle there are work in progress: they are still searching ancient pieces of the castle. Watching the people working there, you can live an incredible experience: you see the old town coming out under your feet...

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  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Maschio Angioino

    by ruki Written Aug 21, 2005

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    Built on the former site of a Franciscan convent dedicated to Santa Maria La Nova, this medieval fortress is better known to locals as Maschio Angioino (the Angevin Keep), after Charles I of Anjou who commissioned it. The castle's Palatine Chapel, also known as the Santa Barbara Chapel, remains a splendid example of Gothic art from the Angevin period. Today, the local council meets in the Sala dei Baroni (reached by an external staircase) and the eastern wing is home to the Museo Civico (local art gallery and museum). Admission to the museum is about EUR6.
    Open Hours: 9a-7p M-Sa

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Castel Nuovo - Sala dei Baroni

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 8, 2005

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    The octagonal Sala dei Baroni is where Ferrante I disposed of a group of rebellious barons in 1485 by inviting them to a mock wedding party and then pouring boiling oil on their heads from the ceiling. The room is still regularly used for city council meetings.

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