Galleria Umberto, Naples

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  • Galleria Umberto I
    Galleria Umberto I
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Galleria Umberto
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Galleria Umberto I
    Galleria Umberto I
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
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    Galleria Umberto I

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Oct 5, 2012

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    Galleria Umberto I
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    Galleria Umberto I is a public shopping gallery. It is located directly across from the San Carlo opera house. It was built between 1887–1891, and was the cornerstone in the decades-long rebuilding of Naples — called the risanamento (lit. "making healthy again") — that lasted until World War I. It was designed by Emanuele Rocco. The Galleria was named for Umberto I, King of Italy at the time of construction. It was meant to combine businesses, shops, cafes and social life — public space — with private space in the apartments on the third floor.
    The Galleria is a high and spacious cross-shaped affair surmounted by a glass dome braced by 16 metal ribs.

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    Galleria Umberto I

    by MM212 Updated Mar 23, 2010

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    Galleria Umberto I - May 09
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    Built in 1890, the Galleria Umberto I is an impressive commercial arcade, similar in architecture and purpose to the famous Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milano, and located near Piazza del Plebiscito. It was constructed during the massive urban redesign project that began in the late 19th century following the cholera epidemic, which led to the demolition of large sections of the city deemed unsanitary. The Belle Epoque gallery was designed by the architect, Emanuele Rocco, and named after Umberto I, the king of Italy at the time. The structure is cross shaped and covered in a vaulted iron and glass ceiling, which culminates in a giant glass dome at its centre. When I visited the Galleria Umberto I in May 09, it was undergoing some restoration work in its interior and seemed somewhat deserted.

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    Galleria Umberto I

    by nyonnetti Written Apr 17, 2008

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    You haven't ever seen a shopping mall like this! It is 100 years old and the architecture is breath-taking! (Of course, there is scaffolding up, like everywhere else in Italy). We sat on the steps of this mall admiring the theatre across the street and the scenery of this bustling city. A stray dog joined us for a while as we contemplated what to do next. You can get amazing views of the harbor if you went left (with the galleria being behind you) from here going past the Royal palace.

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    A 1900 wonder, the Galleria Umberto I

    by Balam Written Feb 26, 2008

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    Galleria Umberto I
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    Should this be here or should it be in shopping tips? well both really i suppose but even if you don't want to go shopping the Galleria is certainly worth seeing.
    A large, marble-floored, glass-roofed space, impressive as a piece of 19th century architecture in itself, that now houses various shops, cafes and restaurant. The palatial Galleria Umberto I shopping centre, opened in 1900, with its marble floors, glass atrium and striking architecture make it a must for your Holiday Pictures.

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    Galleria Umberto

    by wilocrek Written Jan 11, 2008

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    This is not your average run of the mill American mall, first of all there weren't any teenagers that I could see and not a Gap store in sight. The Galleria Umberto is a feast for the eyes with its sky scraping glass ceiling and its simplistic yet beautiful layout, definitely worth stopping in for a look. You can get to the Galleria from Piazza de Plebiscito by going down Cavour, which is the same street that will take your to the National Museum of Naples.

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    Galleria Umberto I

    by toonsarah Written Nov 25, 2007

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    Galleria Umberto I, Naples
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    Near the Piazza del Plebiscito is this grand arcade, which reminded us when we first saw it of those in Milan. But on further exploration it felt very different. Possibly this was partly due to the Sunday atmosphere, with most of the shops closed, but in any case it seemed to exude an air of rather faded grandeur compared with Milan’s very chic confidence. I rather liked it for that, and found it really photogenic. I should also say that part of it was under-going repair and redecoration so later visitors may find its grandeur restored.

    Building on the Galleria was begun in 1887, nine years after the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele in Milan, and completed in 1890. It was part of an urban renewal scheme following a cholera epidemic, which involved "cleaning-up" Naples by destroying the of slum areas between Spaccanapoli and the Palazzo Reale. The design, by an engineer, Emanuele Rocco, consists of a cross-shaped arcade, with a pretty mosaic of the zodiac on the floor at the centre. The dome is 184ft tall. For a really good idea of what it’s like, try the website below where there’s a 360 degree “movie” (not really a movie, more a panorama you can move around in!)

    In its day this was a real Naples destination for the elite, with ground floor weatherproof shopping and professional studios, fashion ateliers, and newspaper offices on the three upper stories. There was also a legendary nightclub, the Salone Margherita, which was the centre of Naples's turn-of-the-20th-century nightlife. Later it became a popular hangout for American soldiers (and their Neapolitan fans) during the American liberation of Italy in 1943-44. Now its star seems to have waned, but maybe the restoration we saw in progress may change all that. I just hope they don’t fill it with the ubiquitous high-street chain stores that make many European city shopping streets look all too familiar.

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    Galleria Umberto

    by Santini738 Written Jul 13, 2007

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    Galleria Umberto inside
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    Galleria Umberto is a public gallery in Naples, southern Italy. It was built between 1887-1891, and was the cornerstone in the decades-long rebuilding of Naples--called the risanamento (lit. "making healthy again)--that lasted until World War One. It was designed by Emanuele Rocco, who employed modern architectural elements reminiscent of an earlier galleria in Milan. The Galleria was named for Umberto I, king of Italy at the time of its construction. It was meant to combine businesses, shops, cafes and social life -- public space -- with private space in the apartments on the third floor.

    The Galleria is a high and spacious cross-shaped affair surmounted by a glass dome braced by 16 metal ribs. Of the four glass-vaulted wings, one fronts on via Toledo (via Roma), still the main downtown thoroughfare, and another opens onto the San Carlo Theater. It has returned to being an active center of Neapolitan civic life after some years of decay.

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    Galleria Umberto

    by rsleisk Updated Jun 5, 2007

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    Galleria Umberto is a public space that is located directly across from the San Carlo opera house. It was built between 1887-1891 It was designed by Emanuele Rocco, who employed modern architectural elements reminiscent of an earlier galleria in Milan. The Galleria was named for Umberto I, king of Italy at the time of its construction. It was meant to combine businesses, shops, cafes and social life -- public space -- with private space in the apartments on the third floor.

    The Galleria is a high and spacious cross-shaped affair surmounted by a glass dome braced by 16 metal ribs. Of the four glass-vaulted wings, one fronts on via Toledo (via Roma), still the main downtown thoroughfare, and another opens onto the San Carlo Theater. It has returned to being an active center of Neapolitan civic life after some years of decay.

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    Galleria Umberto I

    by suhadis Written Oct 5, 2006

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    All that ever catches your attention here on your first visit is the glass roof! It's similar to the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele in Milan, but I think this one seems more spectacular, although this one greatly lacking shops for such a nice "Galleria"- It quite a pity..

    The building is very close to numerous attractions in the area.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Galleria Umberto

    by mvtouring Written Oct 26, 2005

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    This beautfil Galleria is situated next to Piazza Pleblicito. There are many expensive stores inside and a few cafes. We were absolutely thrown back by the beauty and architecture of this lovely building.

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    Galleria Umberto I

    by ruki Written Aug 13, 2005

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    Galleria Umberto I is the second gallery in Naples and the busiest. It was built during urban renewal following a cholera epidemic and the "legge speciale" of 1885. The project was by engineer Emanuele Rocco, and then modified by Ernest Di Mauro and Antonio Curri. In 1890 the Salone Margherita (destined to become the famous singing café) and the Galleria were inaugurated. The architecture joins the new Renaissance façade with beautiful glass and iron roofing.

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    Galleria Umberto I - rooftop view

    by yooperprof Written Jun 2, 2005
    birdseye view

    Looking down at the Galleria from the nearby hillside allows you to appreciate the way that its glass roof still dominates the neighborhood. And it also makes it seem as if Naples has changed very little in the last 100 years!

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  • Galleria Umberto

    by elizabethsloane Updated Apr 10, 2005

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    galleria, napoli

    My visit to Naples lasted all of six hours but it was an awesome introduction. Traveling from the fantasy world of Amalfi, it was shocking to enter a city that is very intense, moody and dark initially. However, as you enter the city center, you begin to see it in a different light. I wish we had more time.

    This mall has the typical shops but is worth seeing if only for the architecture and a pizza shop to die for. Some of the best (and cheapest) pizza I've ever eaten. A photo of the tremendous iron and glass ceiling taken by Giorgio...

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    Galleria Umberto I

    by Polly74 Written Feb 2, 2005

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    View of the gallery from outside

    This gallery was built at the end of the nineteenth century. Galleria Umberto is an imposing building with four wings in iron and glass and a wonderful, huge dome in the middle. The style is similar to that of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele in Milan.
    Inside of it you can find some of the most beautiful and expensive shops in Naples.

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    The Galleria Umberto I Is Opposite the San Carlos

    by hquittner Updated Feb 8, 2014
    An Entrance To the Galleria
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    The Galleria opens under a large dome and has fine entrances as well. The Galleria encloses one of the largest glass roofs in existence.

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