Piazza del Plebiscito, Naples

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  • Piazza del Plebiscito
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  • Piazza del Plebiscito
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Piazza Plebiscito

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Oct 5, 2012

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    Piazza Plebiscito
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    Piazza Plebiscito is one of the largest squares in the city. It is named for the plebiscite taken on October 2 in 1860 that brought Naples into the unified Kingdom of Italy under the House of Savoy. It is bounded on the east by the Royal Palace and on the west by the church of San Francesco di Paola with colonnades extending to both sides.
    The church is reminiscent of the Pantheon in Rome. The façade is fronted by a portico resting on six columns and two Ionic pillars. Inside, the church is circular with two side chapels. The dome is 53 metres high.

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    Piazza del Plebiscito

    by TexasDave Updated Apr 15, 2009

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    The whole area is now for pedestrians only. On the East is the Palazzo Reale and on the West is the 19th century San Francesco di Paola, which was modeled after the Pantheon in Rome. The Colonnades on both sides of the church remind one of St. Peter's Square in Rome as well.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Piazza del Plebiscito & surroundings

    by toonsarah Written Nov 25, 2007

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    Palazzo Reale & Piazza del Plebiscito, Naples
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    Having spent a morning exploring the historic centre of Naples we felt in need of a change so caught a bus from Piazza Dante to the area around the Piazza del Plebiscito. This seemed a popular place among the locals for a Sunday afternoon stroll, so we joined them.

    This is the largest square in the city – a vast cobbled expanse, the scale of which can be easily appreciated thanks to the sensible chaining off which prevents cars from crossing the space or worse, parking on it. Be warned though – the chains don’t prevent the ubiquitous scooters from using it as a short cut, so keep your eyes open!

    The eastern side is dominated by the grand Palazzo Reale. This houses a museum featuring paintings and period furniture, and also the Biblioteca Nazionale. We didn’t go in however, but instead continued our walk to the far side of the square from where we had a wonderful view of the bay, with a marina in the foreground and Vesuvius brooding over the city – an ever-present reminder of Naples precarious location.

    Returning through the square we admired the elegant church of San Francesco di Paolo on its opposite side, before settling in at the Art Nouveau Caffé Gambrinus for our afternoon refreshments – see my separate Restaurant tip about this.

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    Piazza del Plebiscito

    by Santini738 Written Jul 13, 2007

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    Piazza Plebiscito is the largest square in Naples. It is named for the plebiscite taken in 1860 that brought Naples into the unified Kingdom of Italy under the House of Savoy.

    In the first years of the 19th century, the King of Naples was Murat (Napoleon's brother-in-law). He planned the square and building as a tribute to the emperor. When Napoleon was finally dispatched, the Bourbons were restored to the throne of Naples.

    Ferdinand I continued the construction but converted the finished product into the church one sees today. He dedicated it to Saint Francis of Paola, who had stayed in a monastery on this site in the 16th century. The church is reminiscent of the Pantheon in Rome. The façade is fronted by a portico resting on six columns and two Ionic pillars. Inside, the church is circular with two side chapels. The dome is 53 metres high.

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  • rsleisk's Profile Photo

    Piazza del Plebiscito

    by rsleisk Updated Jun 11, 2007

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    An impressive looking piazza that would have looked better if it were not for all the graffiti. Piazza Plebiscito is the largest square in Naples. It is named for the plebiscite taken in 1860 that brought Naples into the unified Kingdom of Italy under the House of Savoy.

    It is bounded on the east by the Royal Palalace and on the west by the church of San Francesco di Paola with the colonnades extending to both sides.

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  • Robert_Hun's Profile Photo

    Piazza del Plesbiscito and Via Toledo

    by Robert_Hun Updated Sep 25, 2005

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    Piazza del Plesbiscito
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    This area provides the most to see and do.
    1. Piazza del Plesbiscito: a huge square in front of the royal palace (Palazzo Reale) with an excellent view on the gulf and the Vesuvius.
    2. Via Toledo: the main walking street of the city with vibrant life and lots of shops.
    You can find the port (Porto Beverello), the Castel Nuovo, the "narrow-street quarter" and the funiculars to the Vomero hill in this area.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Piazza Plebiscito

    by Willettsworld Written Aug 8, 2005

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    Palazzo della Prefettura

    The heart of Naples is Piazza Plebiscito, the biggest square in the city, bounded by the magnificent Royal Palace and the neo-classic church of San Francesco di Paola.

    On opposite sides of the square stand two buildings: Palazzo Salerno and Palazzo della Prefettura which has on the ground floor the renowned Café' Gambrinus, one of the oldest, most famous and most patronized cafés of Naples.

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    Piazza Plebiscito

    by Polly74 Written Feb 7, 2005

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    Piazza Plebiscito has become the symbol of the recent renovation of Naples in the 1994, when it recovered its representative function on the occasion of G7. Since then, the piazza is a pedestrian area designed for the enjoyment of tourists and dwellers; every now and then here are played concerts and happenings or shown large installations of contemporary art.
    Piazza Plebiscito was given its present name on the occasion of plebiscite held here on October 1860, by which Naples and the whole Southern Italy ratified their annexation to Piedmont Kingdom by Savoy. Before the piazza was called "Largo di Palazzo" (wide space in front of the Palace) because it faced main facade of the Royal Palace.

    After the Bourbon's return, Ferdinand IV King of Naples (I as King of Two Sicilies) decided to keep those works, but turning their celebrative significance to advantage of the restoration of monarchy. So he made built in the middle of the colonnade (in front of the Royal Palace) the Basilica dedicated to San Francesco di Paola, not only because he was traditionally loved and venerated by the Neapolitans, but also for the reason that he was the founder of the convent destroyed in order to make place for the Napoleonic forum.

    The church, built between 1816 and 1836 following the project by Pietro Bianchi, is an imitation of the Pantheon in Rome. It has a circular plan and is covered by an hemispherical dome with a lacunar made of stone.

    In the focuses of the ellipse that defines the line of colonnade, they were placed two equestrian statues made of bronze.

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    Equestrian Statue of Victor Emmanuel II

    by hquittner Updated Jan 20, 2014
    King Emmanuel II
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    This statue is at the center of the Piazzo del Municipio surrounded by gardens. It was erected in 1897. The heroic statue of King Victor is set in a plumed hat and cape while set on a prancing horse.

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  • bonio's Profile Photo

    People watching spot!

    by bonio Written Apr 30, 2013
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    A lovely city centre square to linger in and people watch, a favourite occupation on our travels these days!

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Piazza Plebiscito

    by Balam Written Feb 26, 2008

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    Piazza Plebiscito
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    Piazza Plebiscito is a semicircular modern design square. In the Middle of this square sits the "San Francesco di Paola" church

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  • suhadis's Profile Photo

    Piazza del Plebiscito

    by suhadis Written Oct 5, 2006

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    One of the most distinguishable landmarks of Naples is this Piazza, with the Basilica dedicated to San Francesco di Paola, and the Royal Palace on the other side.

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  • ellenron's Profile Photo

    Piazza del Plebiscito

    by ellenron Written Aug 24, 2002

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    An immense piazza, dominated by the Plazzo Reale on one side and the Chiesa di San Francesco di Paola (in the picture) on the other. The Chiesa is based on the Rome's Panatheon.

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