Streets, Pompeii

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  • Street, steppingstones, Pompeii
    Street, steppingstones, Pompeii
    by goodfish
  • Steppingstones, Pompeii
    Steppingstones, Pompeii
    by goodfish
  • Streets
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Easy crossing

    by solopes Updated May 20, 2014

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    Pompeii - Italy
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    There are lots of interesting details to see in Pompeii; One of them is the ingenious solution used to cross the road, in rainy days.

    Looking at the sizes of those rocks, we have to ask: Did the Italian drivers change their behaviour later, or crashes happened at all times in those roads?

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    What to see in Pompeii

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Oct 13, 2012

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    Frescoes
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    There are a lot to see in the Museum:
    The amphitheatre.
    The Great Palaestra (Gymnasium).
    House of the Vettii.
    House of the Faun.
    Forum.
    Temple of Apollo.
    Theatre.
    Via dei Sepolcri
    Lupanar
    House of the Ancient Hunt.
    The Basilica
    Forum Granary
    Baths.
    House of the Tragic Poet.
    The Ground surface
    Bars and Bakeries
    Streets.

    You can watch my 4 min 16 sec Video Pompeii out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

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    • Museum Visits

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    Things to See: Paving the Way

    by goodfish Updated Nov 21, 2011

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    Street, steppingstones, Pompeii
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    No muddy sandals for the fastidious citizens of Pompeii; they had paved streets. With curbs. And sidewalks. Go figure. The material used for the pavers was usually volcanic basalt; very, very durable and also extremely slippery when wet. The streets were raised in middle and sidewalks slanted towards the street to allow rainwater and waste materials to channel into the gutters formed by high curbs.

    Steppingstones placed at convenient intervals kept feet dry and away from any unpleasant muck left by cart-hauling animals. Wheels from these carts - all of uniform axle width - wore ruts into the stones over time which helped keep them on the straight and (very) narrow. Some of these tracks may even have been carved, versus worn, into the stone as a safety precaution.

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  • eksvist's Profile Photo

    Streets of Pompeii

    by eksvist Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you have some more time, you can just walk on the streets of Pompeii and feel the tragical history of this city ...
    My suggestion is, take the enough water with you, because there is very hot between this city walls.

    On the streets are stepping stones, allows people to cross the road. The kerbs are higher than today's, mainly because the streets were regularly flooded to wash dust and debris away.

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    following the routes

    by blusky Written Nov 15, 2010

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    The first time you put your foot on the ancient stones that form numerous strets and paths in Pompei you'll be imerged in the everyday life of old Pompeian people. You'll be almost able to hear them.
    My advice...leave your feet take you

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  • roamer61's Profile Photo

    Streets

    by roamer61 Written May 14, 2009

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    Throughout the site, one can see and walk on the very stones the people of Pompeii walked on 2000 years ago. They have of course been smoothed over the millenia. In some places, you can also see the grooves formed by carts and chariots. Not all streets are like this. The cover photo to this site is proof of that. However, walking down any of the streets here gives one a solemn feeling for the doomed citizens of this once thriving community.

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    Laboratorio dei Tintori

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Apr 9, 2009

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    Laboratorio dei Tintori
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    Following to walk along Via dell'Abbondanza you can see on the left the Laboratorio dei Tintori (in English, Dyers' Laboratory)with the boilers used for the cloths.
    Forward some meters you can see another shop with the lintel of the facede painted with the busts of Apollo, Mercury, Jupiter and Diana; to the sides of the entry you can see two paintings showing Venus among the cupids and a popular sacred procession.

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    Fullonica Stephani

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Apr 5, 2009

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    Fullonica Stephani
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    Some shops beyond the Shop of Verecundus you can see the Fullonica Stephani which is one of the most complete laundromats and dyeing of the town: 13 shops worked the raw wool, in seven handled the spinning and weaving, in nine to the dye, in eighteen to the washing.
    It is also a good example of house turned into shop with the lodgings transfered to the second floor. When you start the visit, on the left you can see the pressorium where the cloths were pressed; in the atrium the implovium was turned into a tub of washing. After the garden you can see more tubs and the saltus fullonici where the workers proceeded to the washing of the cloths through pressing.

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    Ancient 'bridges'

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Jan 16, 2009

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    Along Pompeii's streets you will find stepping stones. Pompeians used them as a 'bridge' when there were floads or just to cross the streets. In the floor near them you can see the signs left by the wheels of the wagons.

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    Via Consolare

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Nov 9, 2008

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    Via Consolare
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    Via Consolare was one of the main streets of the town of Pompeii and it connected the forum with the street that connected Pompeii with the town of Ercolanum (nowdays Ercolano). Along its sides you can see many shops, houses and villas. You can also see a well and many taverns.

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    Porta Ercolano

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Nov 9, 2008

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    Porta Ercolano
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    Porta Ercolano (in English, Ercolano gateway) is the most important gateway of the town of Pompeii. It was also called Saliniensis and it is located in the north-west part of the walls. It has three fornicis: the ones on the sides were reserved to the pedestrians, while the central one was for the wagons.

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    Via dei Sepolcri

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Nov 9, 2008

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    Via dei Sepolcri
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    Via dei Sepolcri (in English, street of the graves) is a perfect example of suburban street with villas, shops and graves. This street was one of the first part of the town to be discovered between 1763 and 1838. From Porta Ercolano you can see many graves among which you can recognise the grave of Marco Cerrinio Restituto; the semicircular exedra dedicated to the priestess Mamia; the grave of Umbricio Scauro with plasters showing gladiatorials.
    Along the street you can see, on the right, the Villa delle Colonne a Mosaico (in English, villa with mosaic columns); the villa di Cicerone (in English, Cicero's villa) and villa di Diomede.

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    Porta Vesuvio

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Nov 1, 2008

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    Porta Vesuvio
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    Porta Vesuvio (in English, Gateway of Mount Vesuvius) was one of the main gateways of the town of Pompeii. It was damaged during the earthquake on 62 DC and it was under restauration on 79. Close to Porta Vesuvio you can see the Castellum Aquae: it was a dispatcher of the waters that flowed from a branch of the aqueduct of the Serino.

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    Via Stabiana

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Oct 19, 2008

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    Via Stabiana
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    Via Stabiana is one of the most important streets of Pompeii. It was the Cardo Maximus of the town and along its sides there were many houses, taverns and shops. In the crossroads between the streets thera are always a fountains and stones in the middle of the street: these were ancient pedestrian passages to help people to cross the road without problems during the rains; there you can see very well the signs left by the wagons.

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    The streets oF pompeii

    by mallyak Written Aug 25, 2008

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    cross the streets when water flooded them
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    The Streets of Pompeii were paved during Roman times with large polygonal blocks of stone. They are bordered by curbs and pedestrian walkways. On most streets there are raised stones at regular intervals that pedestrians used to cross the streets when water flooded them.

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