Temple of Apollo, Pompeii

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  • Temple of Apollo
    by Evenith666
  • Temple of Apollo
    by Evenith666
  • Temple of Apollo
    by Evenith666
  • BorneoGrrl's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo

    by BorneoGrrl Updated Jun 11, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The cella
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    Believed to be constructed by the Samnites, the Temple of Apollo was built in an Italic style even though the temple was dedicated to the Greek god Apollo.

    28 Corinthian columns used to surround the temple and in the center stands a high base connected by a flight of steps to the ground. Statues of Apollo and Dina stood at opposite ends of the temple but these are replicas as the originals are kept National Archaeological Museum in Naples.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Nov 18, 2006

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    Temple of Apollo

    When entering Pompeii, one of the first major sites you will see is the Temple of Apollo.

    The Temple of Apollo was built sometime between the third and fifth centuries B.C. Originally it was formed of 48 Ionic columns, which were later changes to Corinthic-style columns.

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  • Jetgirly's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo

    by Jetgirly Written May 7, 2006

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    Temple of Apollo

    Combining Italian and Greek elements, the Temple of Apollo is one of the oldest religious buildings on the site. There are statues of Apollo (the sun god) and Diana (goddess of the moon) on either side of the columns.

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  • orlandom's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo

    by orlandom Updated Feb 21, 2006

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    Temple of Apollo

    The temple of Apollo, this temple has been present in Pompeii since the town was founded. But interest in the cult of Apollo begun to dwindle in Pompeii in the 5th century BC but the temple survived 300 years more before being replaced by a new one. Corinthian columns surrounded the temple with a stone altar at the front of a long flight of stairs, and the sundial was to the left side of the stairs as you can see in the picture. There is also a statue of Apollo to the right of the temple in bronze.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo:

    by mvtouring Written Oct 26, 2005

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    Temple of Apollo

    This temple was built in the third century B.C and is formed of 48 Ionic columns, which were changed into Corinthian columns in Nero’s age. On a high platform is the cella, the most sacred part of the temple, also surround by thirty Corinthian columns. Today you can still the copies of the deities of Apollo (shooting an arrow) and opposite hime Diana the huntress.

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  • dvideira's Profile Photo

    Temple of Fortuna Augusta

    by dvideira Updated May 5, 2004

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    tempio della fortuna augusta

    This temple, located just a block from the forum, was dedicated to worship of the Fortuna Redux, upon Emperor Caesar Augustus's return from his expeditions in 19-13 BC.

    The city's administrator Marcus Tulius had it built at his own expense and on his own land.

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  • dvideira's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo

    by dvideira Updated May 4, 2004

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    tempio di apollo

    The building combines Italic (high podium where only the priests were allowed inside, with front entry stairs and space for worshipers outside in a courtyard) and Greek elements ( colonnade around the cell ).

    This statue of Apollo depicted as an archer is a reproduction of the original, which is now at the Naples Museum.

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  • Erin74's Profile Photo

    The Temple of Apollo

    by Erin74 Updated Mar 29, 2004
    The statue of Apollo at the Temple of Apollo

    On of the first things you'll come across as you enter Pompeii is the Temple of Apollo. The Temple of Apollo is the oldest sanctuary at Pompeii along with the Doric Temple. The surviving columns and statues date from 575-550 BC. Apollo was once the patron deity of Pompeii but was later replaced by Venus. Still, his temple was a grand and important place.

    Today, the borders of the temple area remain in the form of broken columns and stairs. The interior, which once boasted a large temple, is now an open, grassy area. Most impressive is the bronze statue of Apollo himself. It has remained mostly intact, missing only the bow and arrow that he once held in his hands.

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 12, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Temple of Apollo

    Done in typical Roman temple style, the Temple of Apollo was able to accommodate 1000's of worshipers. Roman style temples have a large courtyard where worshipers could gather and a higher platform or building reserved for the priests. This is exactly the style of the temple. The room at the rear of the temple itself was for only the high priest.

    Unfortunately, the temple was roped off when I was there. I am not sure if that is permanent or if they were doing restoration activities.

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  • sim1's Profile Photo

    The Temple of Apollo

    by sim1 Updated Dec 30, 2003

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    This is a statue in front of the Temple of Apollo. The temple has probably been present in Pompeii ever since the town was founded. Interest in the cult of Apollo began to dwindle in Pompeii in the 5th century BC but the ancient temple survived for a further 3 centuries before being replaced by a new structure.

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo

    by sandysmith Written Jul 7, 2003

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    temple of Apollo

    The Temple of Apollo, near the forum, is a typical Roman style temple - space for worshipers outside in a courtyard whilst the temple was high off the ground and only the priests allowed inside. In the rear of the Temple of Apollo was a room that only the high priest could enter. It was like the "Holy of Holies" in the temple in Jerusalem.

    The original bronze of the pagan god apollo is also in the Naples museum.

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  • Venturingnow's Profile Photo

    A very nice temple

    by Venturingnow Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Poseidon hole

    There is a very nice house/villa/sauna type building right on the intersection of the two main roads in Pompeii, the one that leads to/from the temples and the ampitheater, and the one that leads to the housing development. Anyway, inside the building are numerous remains from the past, most notibaly the Poseidon engraving. What you've got to do is enter this temple/house and stare at the hole in the wall (pictured) and then all of a sudden, just below the hole will appear the face of Poseidon, the Water God. That's his name right? It's really quite cool because it is not visably there unless the light and your state is just right.

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  • Venturingnow's Profile Photo

    The miniature men

    by Venturingnow Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Mini men

    There is a fascinating temple with a bunch of miniature men statues on the wall, all holding up a border that goes around the entire room of the place. This is the room that you can see Poseidon in, it is really beautiful. There are probably over a hundred little men statues all a little different from the rest.

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  • Venturingnow's Profile Photo

    The Temple of Isis and Apollo

    by Venturingnow Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Temple of Isis

    There are two other main temples within Pompeii. The Temple of Isis is the best preserved temple of Pompeii. It dates from the pre-Roman age and was almost entirely rebuilt after the earthquake of 62 A.D. I read that the sacred water of the Nile was kept in an underground passage inside the temple, weird huh?. A large room that was used as a meeting room for the initiates of Isis is behind the temple.Now, the Temple of Apollo has a really nice bronze statue and some really nice arcades, the columns are quite impressive here.

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  • TRimer's Profile Photo

    Temple of Apollo

    by TRimer Written Oct 12, 2002
    Temple of Apollo

    The Temple of Apollo was surrounded by 48 columns. The cella, which was the most sacred part of the temple, was on a high raised platform. This cella itself was surrounded by thirty columns and contained the cult statue of the god and an omphalos. In front of the cella was the altar. Beside the steps to the cella was an Ionic column set up by the town councillors, L. sepanius and M. Herennius. On the top of this column was a sundial.

    In the temple were two bronze statues - one of Apollo with his bow and the other of his sister, Diana.

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