Cascia Travel Guide

  • Cascia
    Cascia
    by Mikebond
  • Source of Life
    Source of Life
    by Mikebond
  • nave of the lower basilica
    nave of the lower basilica
    by Mikebond

Cascia Things to Do

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    nave of the lower basilica 4 more images

    by Mikebond Updated Mar 8, 2008

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    This basilica is located at a lower level than the main church, hence its name. It has little artistic attractions, apart from the painting of the Christ you see in this photo. Instead, it is interesting from the religious point of view, as it keeps the so-called Eucharistic Miracle (a particle that turned into blood after a priest had put it into his breviary), the relics of Blessed Simone Fidati (1285-1348), who brought the Miracle to Cascia, and the tomb of Blessed Maria Teresa Fasce(1881-1947), a nun who spread the message of Santa Rita, ran an orphanage and did other remarkable actions.
    The last picture shows Christ in the sepulchre with a crib above it.

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    Source of Life

    by Mikebond Written Mar 8, 2008

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    This sculptured fountain is called "Source of Life": the pigeons drink the water that flows out of the rocks. It represents the love of God.

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    by Mikebond Written Mar 8, 2008

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    The inside of Santa Rita's basilica has a Greek-cross shape with a central dome and four apses. Everything is painted. Notice the apsis painting and the series of paintings telling the life of the Saint, above the columns. Worth remarking are also the sculptured altar and lectern.
    It is forbidden to take photos inside, but most people take a lot of pictures, even with flash. It would be nice if you respected the forbid or if, at least, turned the flash off. I have taken a couple of pictures myself, but from the entrance and without flash, so that I didn't hurt anyone. Consider that most people go to this church to pray, so behave in a proper way.

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Cascia Hotels

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Cascia Transportation

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    by Mikebond Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you aren't travelling with your own car (the best solution to move across this region), you can reach Cascia by bus from both Spoleto (around 50 kms) and Rome (around 150 kms). Buses are run by Spoletina (SSIT). You can find the timetables in the site below, which is unfortunately only in Italian.
    The bus stop in Cascia is located in the upper part, close to the sanctuary of Santa Rita. To go to the lower part, just take the stairs down (elevators only let you climb).

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    my mum on an escalator

    by Mikebond Updated Dec 31, 2007

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    The best way to move in Cascia, besides your feet, are the escalators that connect the village to the hill where the sanctuary of Santa Rita is located. You can use them to reach the museum (Palazzo Sarti) as well. Escalators are free and don't pollute, so take them whenever you are tired of walking.
    Remark: escalators remain still when nobody is using them, so don't think they don't work if they don't move! You must put your foot on them and you'll climb!

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  • Cascia Hotels

    4 Hotels in Cascia

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Cascia Local Customs

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    by Mikebond Written Jan 7, 2008

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    Rita was born in 1381 in Roccaporena, a small village 5 kms from Cascia. Around the age of 16, she got married to Paolo di Ferdinando Mancini: they had two sons. The murder of her husband, victim of the fight between the opposing factions, turned her life upside down, but she was able to forgive. Her sons, instead, wanted to avenge the father’s death but Rita prayed God to take them to Himself rather than let them commit such an action. So, both of them died very young.
    Later, Rita, who was still young, asked to be accepted at the Augustinian monastery of Santa Maria Maddalena in Cascia. At first she wasn’t allowed to join the order, but she finally managed to become a nun. She spent 40 years in the convent. In her last 15 years of life, she got on her front the stigmata of one of the thorns that formed Jesus’ crowns, so she felt on herself the pain Jesus had suffered.
    Rita Mancini died on 22nd May 1457. She was declared Saint by Pope Leo XIII on 24th May 1900.

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