Portici, Bologna

7 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • Portico Piazza Cavour
    Portico Piazza Cavour
    by croisbeauty
  • Portico
    Portico
    by croisbeauty
  • Portici
    by croisbeauty
  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Gradually evolution of porticoes

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: There is interesting story and facts regarding portici of Bologna. The first officially documented porticoe dates from 1211, and since 1289 porticoes became a mandated feature for each new built house in the town.
    The first picture shows so called "sporto", it is extended out of the main body of the building by two or three feet only, and it is the beginning of the porticoes. Larger extends are called "beccadelli".
    The second picture shows wooden portico of Palazzo Seracchioli, which is located opposite to Palazzo Mercanzia. It is next evolution of porticoes.
    The third picture shows well known portico Isolani, combined by wooden and brick pillars.
    The fourth picture shows wooden sporto and portici in Via Clavature.
    The last picture shows bricked porticoe, the last in line of graduating.

    Fondest memory: As an architectural element portico was first used in ancient Greek, forming entrances to temples. The greatest innovator in architecture, Andrea Palladio, was a pioneer of using temple-fronts for secular buildings (in the16th century).
    "Portici Bolognesi" emerged in the late Middle Ages (12-13th c.), when started much stronger settlement of the city, particularly by students who attend the University of Bologna. Following it, abruptly increased the need for more living space. It is noteworthy that in the Middle Ages ground floor of the buildings inside the cities were not used for sleeping. Specifically, due to bad insulation space on the ground floor penetrated the dust, dirt and grime from the street, this part of the house was inhabited by the servants. Resourceful Bolognesi began to expand spaces in the upper floors of the house by adding "sporti" or "beccadelli". As such extensions were not enough "beccadelli" were stalled and protected with wooden piers, and so the first portico was born. In fact, it could be said that the portico was created spontaneously.
    Portico was proved very useful, protecting passers from the rain and sun and drastically reduced the penetration of dirt in the ground floor of the buildings. In this context, already in 1288 the city government adopted a decree according to which all new homes are required to have a portico, provided a height of 7 Bologna feet (2,66m) and wide enough to pass a man and a horse. In 1352 a new regulation stipulated a height of 10 feet (3,6m). Finally, the decree from 1568 stipulates that portico must be built from brick or stone.
    Portico of San Luca of 3.796 meters is the longest portico in the world. The narrowest portico is located in the quarter of Saragozza, which once housed brothels.

    Palazzo Seracchioli late medieval portico Palazzo Isolani

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Terrazzo Pavements

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 13, 2014

    Favorite thing: When you are walking underneath the arcades, have a look at the pavement now and then. Most arcades are paved with terrazzo floors. They consist of small pieces of stone inserted in a cement ground, and then smoothed and polished to create an even surface. Such floors are usually indoors, in Bologna they are common in the portici, too. Stnes and cement can be dyed in variosu colours and sorted in patterns.

    Fondest memory: Some floors have patterns or little pictures that match the function of the adjacent building, like the sun outside Teatro del Sole (photo 1).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Sotto ai portici - Underneath the Arcades

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 13, 2014

    Favorite thing: Bologna's old town has I don't know how many kilometres of arcades along any street that is wide enough. City life takes place sotto ai portici. They protect from both summer sun and heat and from rainfall, and also from the road traffic. The arcades provide comfortable covered walkways on smooth terrazzo pavements. Many little shops are waiting to be discovered. Bars and restaurants have their tables out.

    Fondest memory: Stroll and explore. Walk the arcades, look what is hidden underneath, enjoy the perspectives and the changing street views through the rows of columns.

    Lively Via dell'Independenza Bookshop on Sunday morning
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Portici

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is one of the typical porticoes of Bologna, which have a total length of around 40 Km.
    Originally, the porticos were made of wood which later on had been replaced with brick.
    Palazzo Isolani and Palazzo Grassi are typical existing examples of building that underwent enlargement.
    Porticoes dominating in every street in downtown and if streched out in a straight line would measure over 40 kilometres in length. The walkways under the porticoes is what making Bologna to be unique.

    Fondest memory: People began to build the characteristic Portici partly because the town was often devastated by wars and fights, so that being not able to live outside the walls, they would rather expand their houses, and partly because porticos would protect them from rain, snow and sun.

    Portico Portico Piazza Cavour
    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • alemir82's Profile Photo

    Galleria Marescalchi

    by alemir82 Written Feb 18, 2006

    Favorite thing: This gallery features traditional art, on sale are paintings and prints by native son Morandi; Italian modern master De Chirico; and foreigners Chagall and Magritte. This is a great place to go if you're looking to buy some excellent works of art.

    Via Mascarela 116B

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Study Abroad
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Bologna is probably the most...

    by xaver Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Bologna is probably the most important italian university city, so wander around Zamboni street and Belle arti street to meet a very intensive student life.
    Everywhere there are messages of people looking for a place to sleep or people looking for someone to share their room with

    Was this review helpful?

  • pollon's Profile Photo

    pollon's General Tip

    by pollon Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: I wasn't lieing, the opening one and this pic of arcades are the only two shy attempts to shoot pics...

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bologna

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

27 travelers online now

Comments

View all Bologna hotels