Bologna Local Customs

  • usual city scene
    usual city scene
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  • Lampione Liberty
    Lampione Liberty
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  • Via Clavature
    Via Clavature
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Most Recent Local Customs in Bologna

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    Ludogatto and her workshop

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 28, 2014
    Simona and her workshop
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    Simona is our dear fellow member Ludogatto, who is resident of Bologna. We are virtual friends from about several years ago and I finally met her in live during my visit of Bologna in June 2006. It was a "wrong" day to visit Bologna because Simona was occupied with parade in which her kid workshop was one of the participants. Anyway, I was very glad to meet her, even if it was shortly.

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    Par Tot Parata

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 28, 2014

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    Par Tot Parata 2006
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    Bologna is one of my favorite towns and I like to visit it any time its possible, even if just passing by. This time, in 2006, I came to meet our fellow member Ludogatto who is resident of Bologna.
    During my visit there was annual event of so-called "Par tot parata" in the city of Bologna, the name is a local dialect for "Parata per tutti" (Parade for all). The parade is intercultural and intergenerational event made up of drums, music, dances from different countries, which are mixed with street theater performers, clowns and jugglers. In the parade resident becomes artist and the artist becomes inhabitant. The heart of the parade are the creative workshops.
    Ludogatto is the leader of one children workshop and her kid-artists, of different ethnic origins, have participated in the parade. It was really nice and enjoyable to meet her and her workshop group.

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    Via Clavature

    by croisbeauty Updated Mar 4, 2013

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    Via Clavature
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    In the Middle Ages via Clavature was one of the main streets of the city, street which has seen passing popes, princes and emperors. In the past, as well as today, the area of so-called "quadrilatero" (quadrilateral) was dedicated to the trade. The name comes from ancient workshops of blacksmiths who bult keys and locks, in Bolognese dialect called "clavauture".
    Via Clavature is narrow street and still has the flavor of ancient perfumes that for years have made it so special, one of the delicacies that characterize the city of Bologna. As soon as one enters the street can smell the onions and garlic, which was mixed with the fish. Good food, hospitality, elegance and simplicity, these are the typical features of Clavature, framed with the 17th century Palazzo Pepoli Campogrande, located in one of the most fascinating areas in the center of Bologna.
    Clavature is one of those places rich with history, steeped by old charm that can be sented at each step.

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    Museums everywhere

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 30, 2013

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    Museum
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    The whole central part of the town looks like an big open space museum and virtually every building in it deserves your attention. Great many of building are constructed by the red coloured bricks which makes the old core very pitoresque. For such an, relatively small town, Bologna has great number of museums and you'll met them all around.
    - Museo Civico Archeologico is in Via dell'Archiginnasio 2
    - Pinacoteca Nazionale is in Via Belle Arti 56
    - Collezioni Comunali d'Arte di Bologna is at Piazza Maggiore 6
    - Biblioteca Comunale dell'Archiginnasio is at Piazza Galvani 1
    - Museo Morandi is at Piazza Maggiore 6
    - Museo Civio Medievale is in Via Manzoni 4
    - Museo Civico d'Arte Industriale e Galleria Davia Bergellini is is Via Maggiore 44
    - Museo Civico del Risorgimento is at Piazza Carducci 5
    - Museo Civio Bibliografico Musicale is at Piazza Rossini 2
    - Museo Storico Didattico della Tappezzeria isin Via Casaglia 3
    - University's Museums are in Via Zamboni 33
    Do not miss to visit museums in the churches; Santo Stefano, San Domenico, San Petronio,.

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    Flea market at Piazza San Stefano

    by croisbeauty Written Jan 30, 2013

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    Flea market in Piazza San Stefano
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    I was several times in Bologna, before and after this visit in 2006, but never before have seen this flea market in Piazza San Stefano. Could it be that the fair is taking place each year around 10th of June, which was the day of my visit?
    The local lady have explain, the antique market held every second Sunday of the month. Here on Piazza San Stefano one can find jewelry, furniture, carpets and picture frames. Don't be surprised if prices are high, one must be very skillful in burgain to reduce them. In case one is interesting in books or lace, there is another smaller flea market held on Thursdays in via Valdonica and Piazza San Martino.

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    Lampione Liberty

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 30, 2013

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    Lampione Liberty

    This huge lantern called Liberty, recently restored, is hanging in the palace Re Enzo since 1920, actually at its corner on Piazza Nettuno and Via Rizzoli.
    "Ogni vita che nasce porta luce sulla terra" (EVERY LIFE THAT IS BORN BRINGS LIGHT TO THE EARTH), this striking thought inspired the mayor of Bologna, Mr. Virginio Merola, turning on a lantern post for every newborn in the city. What a nice and moving idea, welcome to every newborn in the city, a symbolic flash to share with everyone a moment of joy in Bologna!

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    Arte muralis

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 30, 2013

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    arte muralis in portico opposite to the University
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    This are nice pieces of work and look very atractive. The first graphite is painted on the front facade of an house which is under major reconstruction works and it will probably disappeared in a while. To bad because it is nice piece of work and funny. The other one is painted on a wall in porticoe which is situated right opposite to the main entrance of the university (Universita degli studi). You can't miss it coz it still stands there.

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    Luigi Galvani

    by croisbeauty Written Jan 28, 2013

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    statue of Luigi Galvani
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    Luigi Aloisio Galvani (1737-1798), who lived and died in Bologna, was Italian physician, philosopher and doctor in medicine. In 1771 he discovered that the muscles of dead frogs legs twitched when struck by a spark. This was one of the first forays into the study of bioelectricity, a field that still today studies the electrical patterns and signals of the nervous system.
    After French occupation of Northern Italy in 1797, it was required every university professor to swear loyalty to the new authority. Galvani refused to swear loyalty and this led to the new authority depriving him of all academis and public positions, which took every financial support away. Galvani died in Bologna, in his brother's house, on December 4, 1798.
    Galvani's monument stand in the square dedicated to him, facing the Palazzo dell'Archiginnasio, the ancient seat of the University of Bologna. A big marble statue, work of Italian sculptor Adalberto Cencetti from 1875, has been erected to the scientist while observing one of his famous frog experiments.

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    Padre Marella

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 22, 2013

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    the corner of padre Marella

    This city site is simply called "Angollo di Padre Marella" and every citizens of Bologna knows it perfectly well. Don Olinto Marella (1882-1969), known as Padre Marella, was the good spirit of the city. After WW II he established orphanage in the city of Bologna for all kids who lost their parents during the big war.
    Padre Marella used to stand on this corner, each and every day, with the hat in his hand begging small money for his orphans and securing them warm accomodation and daily food....

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    The Theatre "Arena del sole"

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 22, 2013

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    Teatro Arena del Sole
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    The theatre "Arena del Sole" offers most interesting selection of prose and contemporary ballet shows. It is situated in Via Indipendenza, about 5 minutes walking from Piazza Maggiore.
    Teatro Arena del Sole was built in 1810, mainly to plans originally drawn up by Carlo Asparri. The statues showing on its facade were carved by Alfredo Neri.

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    Aperitivo:the Italian way of preparing for dinner.

    by Laserone Written Nov 9, 2011

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    I've practically tested out all the "aperitivi" sites in Bologna in 6 years there and most have been crossed out mostly because of a terrible lack of quality and price. I will, however, direct you to

    Via Parigi, where under an archway (bologna has 33km of archways by the way so don't mind the umbrella too much) you will encounter a small bar run by a couple from the south, called "Cicileo". The wine is good, generous portions and the food is made as you drink. The owner wears gloves while preparing delights all served on small slices of bread.

    This place, although not big in size, is by far the best to my flavor.

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    The Food History of Bologna

    by painterdave Written Sep 26, 2011

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    more pasta
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    Its the pork....the way they prepare it and place it into pasta. Bologna is famous for this. They try not to reveal their secret recipes handed down through time. Walk into any meat shop, and your eyes will feast on taste treats of all types. Cheeses on all types, too, are found here.
    Before you come to this area, try to read up a bit on their food history. It will make your restaurant experiences more enjoyable.

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    When in Rome (or Bologna), do as the Romans do

    by Bunsch Written Dec 1, 2010

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    I must have led a charmed life up to this particular venture to Italy, because in all the other countries I visited, English was either one of the standard languages or, in the case of France, I spoke the ambient tongue. I suppose I expected that many, if not most, of the hoteliers and shop keepers and transport personnel in Italy would speak at least a modicum of English. I didn't invest in a phrase-book (although it turned out my companion had brought one along). What arrogance! I have only myself to blame for the multiple times when language barriers led to absurd or disappointing results. (It is hard to ask for directions when you can't articulate where you want to go -- and can't understand when someone tries to help out.)

    Probably no one reading this tip would make such a foolish mistake, but just in case...either learn enough Italian to get by, or keep a phrase-book or English-Italian dictionary close at hand. I promise you'll have a more enjoyable visit.

    (And as one VT'er says in a very funny motto which I will badly paraphrase, speaking English slowly and very loudly does NOT make it more comprehensible!)

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    Never on a Monday

    by Bunsch Written Aug 25, 2010

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    Not just in Bologna...many (perhaps most) Italian museums are closed on Mondays. This can be a spirit-killer if you're only in a city or town for a single day and the museums are unavailable, which is why the Spirit moves me to suggest that much of Italy's great art is found in its churches, virtually all of which are open every day of the week (and are generally free, to boot). So find your Caravaggios and della Robbias in the local duomo, and soak in the notion that people have been hallowing with their prayers the place where they are situated for many hundreds of years.

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    Cover charges and tipping

    by Bunsch Updated Aug 14, 2010

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    When you are seated at an Italian restaurant, you should anticipate paying "coperto" or a cover charge, assessed on a per person basis. This ranges from something minimal to several euros, presumably depending upon the restaurant although I never analyzed this during our trip. Since the cover charge is intended to compensate the restaurant for the cost of doing business, including the employment of the wait staff, I was told not to apply the American standard of tipping 15% or more of the bill. Rather, the tradition seemed to be to put one's excess change on top of the credit card slip or cash to cover the meal. That sometimes resulted in several euros' "tip" but it would still be a fraction of what I'd pay at home, even if one included the coperto.

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Bologna Local Customs

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