Museums, Bologna

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  • Palazzo Ghisiraldi - Museo Civico Mediovale
    Palazzo Ghisiraldi - Museo Civico...
    by croisbeauty
  • Palazzo Ghisiraldi, inneryard
    Palazzo Ghisiraldi, inneryard
    by croisbeauty
  • Museo di Mineralogia
    Museo di Mineralogia
    by croisbeauty
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    Museo di Mineralogia L. Bombicci

    by croisbeauty Updated Feb 28, 2013

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    Museo di Mineralogia

    The imposing building of Museo di Mineralogia L,Bombicci concludes the sequence of the buildings on the right side of via Zamboni. Actually, it is located on the square opposite to Porta San Donato.
    The museum was founded in 1860 by young professor Luigi Bombicci. The collection holds over 50.000 pieces, of which 10.000 are displayed and organized in sections of various size and importance. Of particular importance is the huge piece of gypsum, the hopper-crystal Quartz and the phosphoric stone of Bologna, which was famous and highly prized by medieval alchemists.
    Besides other exsibits, notoworthy are ornamental stones used for building during the Roman times and from Renaissance onwards, antique optical instruments, and Lithic material used by man since the Prehistoric era.

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    Museo Civico Archeologico

    by sylina Written Feb 21, 2012

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    The courtyard
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    Archaeological Museum (Museo Civico Archeologico), Via dell'Archiginnasio 2, ¢Ï +39 51 2757211, [8]. Tu-F 9AM-3PM, Sa-Su and holidays 10AM-6:30PM. This building, an old hospital, houses a comprehensive collection of antiquities including Egyptian civilization (mummies and sarcophagi), iron age Villanova culture, artifacts from Etruscan Velzna, funerary art, terracotta urns, ancient vases and items from Roman times. Do not miss the bronze Certosa jar which is over 1,500 years old. Free. -- Wikitravel http://wikitravel.org/en/Bologna

    A lot of Etruscan artfacts are exhibited in this museum.. and it's free of charge.. :)

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    Museo del Patrimonio Industriale

    by ludogatto Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you want to know something more on the channels and on their importance in the development of the industry in Bologna territory you can visit this museum.
    U can know something more on the Mortadella Industy, the silk in the past, on the 'cotto', the red brick of our house.
    It is not only a museum of the industry, but interesting things can be known little a lot and notes of Bologna.
    Visit the the website of this museum there are lot of interesting meeting!

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    Pinacoteca di Bologna

    by von.otter Written Nov 15, 2010
    Pinacoteca di Bologna, May 2010
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    “The art of Bologna in its earlier phases shows the mediaeval school represented by numerous Byzantine-Romanesque panels and manuscript illuminations (Bologna Museum and elsewhere).”
    — from “A Short History of Italian Painting” 1914 by Alice Van Vechten Brown, William Rankin

    The Pinacoteca di Bologna, the National Gallery of Bologna, is located in the university area, in the same building which houses the Academy of Fine Arts and the Superintendent for the Historic, Artistic and Ethno-Anthropological Heritage of Bologna. This arrangement blends exhibition space, protection, conservation and study of the art in Bologna and Emilia-Romagna styles.

    The National Gallery is housed in the former Jesuit monastery of St. Ignatius. “The Apotheosis of St Ignatius” (see photos #2 and #3) can be seen in the stairwell’s ceiling fresco. The core of its collections is the result primarily of the destruction of churches and convents by the occupying Napoleonic administration.

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    Municipal Art Collection at the Bologna Town Hall

    by von.otter Updated Oct 19, 2010
    Neptune, Municipal Art Collection, Bologna, 5/2010
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    Founded in 1936, Il Palazzo Comunale di Bologna le Collezioni Comunali d’arte (Bologna’s Municipal Art Collection) is located in what was once the winter apartments of the Cardinal Papal Legates on the first floor of Palazzo Comunale. The rooms are decorated with friezes and ceiling paintings from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth century. This is a major collection of paintings, furniture, furnishings, house hold goods, from major donations made to the City of Bologna primarily during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

    Take note of “Genius” (see photo #5) by Giacomo de Maria (1762-1838), a Bolognese Neoclassical sculptor. This 1797 work stands in an elaborate presentation piece at the far end of the Galleria Vidoniana, Room #4, in the Collezioni Comunali d'Arte.

    Opening hours, Tuesday to Friday: 9.00 am to 6.30 pm; Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays: 10.00 am to 6.30 pm

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    Municipal Art Collection, Bologna Town Hall Part 2

    by von.otter Updated Oct 19, 2010
    Bologna���s Municipal Art Collection, May 2010
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    “Bolognese, it is a rough and chopped, horrible dialect.”
    — Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

    Founded in 1936, Bologna’s Municipal Art Collection is located in what was once the winter apartments of the Cardinal Papal Legates, with friezes and ceiling paintings from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth century. This is a major collection of paintings, furniture, furnishings, house hold goods, from major donations made to the City of Bologna primarily during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

    In Room #5, take note of the large group of crucifixes (see photo #4) carved and painted in the Middle Ages, the majority of which, prior to 1936, was included in the Medieval section of the Civic Museum at Palazzo Galvani, opened in 1882. Some of these crucifixes were carved/painted by known masters, but whose names are not known such as the Master of the Franciscan Crucifixes, the Master of Arquà. While others were created by named artists, including Vitale da Bologna, Jacopo di Paolo, Barnaba da Modena, Alvar Pirez.

    Whenever a museum occupies a former castle or palace, I always advise visitors to look up; some of the best art is on the ceilings (see photos #1, #2, #3 & #5). The rooms of the palaces were richly decorated for their important owners. LOOK UP!

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    Museums of The Palazzo Communale

    by Maria81 Written Jan 3, 2010

    Collezioni Comunali d'Arte

    On the second floor of the Palazzo Communale, it features paintings, sculpture and furniture, all predominantly dating from the 13th to the 19th centuries

    Museo Morandi

    Dedicated to (predictably) Giorgio Morandi, who was a local, it features over 200 of his classic works

    Practicalities

    Entrance to both museums is free

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    Torre della Specola

    by MM212 Updated Aug 2, 2009

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    la Torre della Specola

    A tower like no other in Bologna, la Torre della Specola was not built as a defensive structure, a church campanile, or as a sign of family wealth. In fact, it was one of the last towers to be constructed, in 1721, as an astronomical observatory for the Institute of Sciences (Istituto di Scienze). Nevertheless, the tower's design was true to Bologna's Mediaeval traditional architecture, and complemented the 16th century Palazzo Poggi, where it was located. In 1803, Palazzo Poggi and Torre della Specola were taken over by the University of Bologna. Nowadays, they house il Museo della Specola, a museum dedicated to astronomy.

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    Palazzo Davia-Bargellini

    by MM212 Updated Aug 1, 2009

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    Telamons of Palazzo Bargellini
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    Designed by Bartolomeo Provaglia for Camillo Bargellini, Palazzo Davia-Bargellini was completed in 1658. One of the prized features of the palazzo are the two colossal sculptures of Telamon flanking the entrance. The Greek mythological figures were sculpted by Gabriele Brunelli and his student, Francesco Agnesini. Another distinguishing feature is that the palazzo does not have an arcaded portico, which was typical of palaces built for "senatorial" families in Bologna, among them the Bargellini. In the early 19th century, the Davia family purchased the palace, so it now also carries their name. Nowadays, the edifice houses a gallery and an art museum, il Museo Civico d'Arte Industriale.

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    Palazzo Sanguinetti / Museo della Musica

    by MM212 Updated Aug 1, 2009

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    Painted hall in Palazzo Sanguinetti
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    The 16th century Palazzo Sanguinetti, along with its neighbouring Casa Masetti, was built around the mediaeval Oseletti tower. In the 18th century, Palazzo Sanguinetti was renovated and its interior was covered with amazing frescoes painted by some well-known bolognese artists of the time. The palazzo now houses a museum and a library dedicated to music and its instruments, Museo Internazionale e Biblioteca della Musica di Bologna. Entry into the museum is free of charge, so visiting is worthwhile at least to see the impressive interior of the palace, even if historical musical instruments are not of great interest.

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    Palazzo Ghisiraldi/ Museo Civico Medievale

    by MM212 Updated Aug 1, 2009

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    The courtyard and its double loggia
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    Housed in the 15th century Palazzo Ghisiraldi, il Museo Civico Medievale displays a rich collection of mediaeval and Renaissance art and artefacts from Bologna. The palace itself is a beauty and is worth visiting. It was designed in 1483 by Zilio di Battista Montanari for the Ghisiraldi family. As was typical for that era, it has a gorgeous red brick and terracotta façade, with Romanesque windows, and a spacious courtyard with a double loggia. The palace was later acquired by the Fava family, so it is sometimes referred to by the two names, i.e. Palazzo Ghisiraldi-Fava.

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    Pinacoteca Nazionale di Bologna

    by MM212 Updated Jul 29, 2009

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    Gothic art in Pinacoteca Nazionale
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    Housed in a former Jesuits college, la Pinacoteca Nazionale di Bologna is the city's best art museum. It opened its doors in 1885 as an independent museum, having earlier also been the portrait gallery of l'Accademia di Belle Arti (Bologna's fine arts academy). On display is an amazing collection of art, mainly from the 14th - 18th centuries, of bolognese painters alongside impressive names from other parts of Italy, including Rafaello, Tintoretto and Guercino. Visiting this museum was such a pleasure, especially when compared to the tourist-mobbed museums of Florence and other more popular destinations in Italy, as I was one of the few visitors.

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    University museums at Palazzo Poggi

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 26, 2008

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    Colorful frescoes inside Palazzo Poggi
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    When you're around the university area, be sure to drop by the university's museum at Palazzo Poggi. It's free, fun, and a few pieces, quite freaky. Its collection is a merry mix of art (the museum's dramatic frescoes), history (maps, globes, ships), and natural sciences (medieval teaching aids, preserved specimens) and is worth spending an hour or two.

    I find the female reproductive system models (a significant space is devoted to obstetrics) quite fascinating, albeit freaky (picture 2), and the frescoes are works of art themselves. The map room is sure to attract the attention of ardent travelers like us.

    Admission is free. Museum hours: 10am-1pm & 2-6pm Mon-Fri; 10:30am-1:30pm & 2:30-5:30pm Sat & Sun.

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    Pinacoteca Nazionale

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 22, 2008

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    The museum's courtyard
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    Pinacoteca Nazionale is the city's main art gallery featuring a good collection of works by Bolognese artists - the "pride of the place" factor - including Vitale da Bologna, Guido Reni, Guercino, and the Caracci family, one of the pioneers of the Counter-Reformation movement in Italy in the latter half of the 16th century.

    I find the museum well-organized and works well-presented despite the labyrinthine alleys. Very popular works are Perugino's Madonna in Glory and Raphael's celebrated The Ecstasy of St Cecilia. At the time of my visit, the museum has set up a special exhibition on the life and works of the 15th century renaissance painter Amico Aspertini.

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    MAMbo (Modern Art Museum Bologna)

    by darkjedi Updated Nov 4, 2008

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    If modern art is your genre then you will love this place, its full of everything you expect from an extremely elitist museum.

    Stuffy receptionists, a guard/watcher in EVERY room (they even get up and stand next to you when you get near an exhibit), (and walk away when you ask them something).. they really did!! Oh and your not allowed to take any photographs...he he he

    I have visited quite a few museums but have never been made to feel so intimidated by the staff here, I would advise your time spent better in the Pinocoteca National Gallery, they know how to treat guests there, and you'll actually be made welcome.

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