Parma Off The Beaten Path

  • The View,Castello di Torrechiara, June 2010
    The View,Castello di Torrechiara, June...
    by von.otter
  • The milk starts here
    The milk starts here
    by 807Wheaton
  • Another process
    Another process
    by 807Wheaton

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Parma

  • Manara's Profile Photo

    In the shade of ancient walls

    by Manara Written Apr 15, 2007

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    I have a special liking for cloisters, because of the sense of peace and harmony they give to me. I appreciate this feeling most if I can find it in the middle of a city. There are three cloisters here in the San Giovanni Abbey, and access is free. If you happen to visit the church of San Giovanni, I strongly recommend you to get in and enjoy, even if for a few minutes, the atmosphere of the cloisters. Upstairs you can visit also the old library, with a precious collection of medieval illuminated books.
    The entrance is easy to find, close to the entrance to the church. The only thing that can be a bit confusing is the fact that you must go through the monks' shop to go to the cloisters.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Manara's Profile Photo

    Giardino di San Paolo

    by Manara Updated Apr 6, 2007

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    The gate in Borgo Giordani
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    It's amazing how much one walks when visiting a city! Especially when it is warm, a tourist needs to sit down somewhere cool.
    In the centre of Parma there are several places where you can sit under the shade of trees, but this small park is certainly my favourite, so quiet and secluded. It is hidden behind a wall, in a narrow street called Borgo Pietro Giordani. This street used to be called "Borgo San Paolo", and in the novel "La Chartreuse de Parme" the lovers Fabrizio and Clelia were supposed to have a secret love-nest here. It is fiction, of course, but it adds a romantic touch to this lovely corner of the old town.
    It is in the city centre, a by-street of Via Garibaldi.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel

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  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    Vittorio Bottego

    by Mikebond Updated Mar 19, 2006

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    Vittorio Bottego

    If you go to Parma by train, you will see this monument in a square just outside the railway station.
    When I photographed it, I had no idea of who that man was, but I learnt from Anna Maria (Manara)'s Parma page that he was Vittorio Bottego, one of the many explorers who travelled to Africa in the 19th century to discover the areas of the black continent that were still unknown to mankind. There are two more human figures representing two rivers Bottego explored, the Omo and the Juba.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Ducale

    by croisbeauty Updated Mar 27, 2008

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    Palazzo Ducale
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    As already told, the Ducal Park and the Palace were designed by Vignola who was known for its small tower on the central body of the building. During the years, the original structure was modified and extended several times. The entrance to the palace was completely changed, there used to stand the bridge crossing a small lake in front.
    After Farnese's the palace was scarcely used for the summer residence because Bourbons and Marie Louise prefered the other palaces in the surroundings of Parma.
    Today, the palace accommodates the local police forces.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Parco Ducale

    by croisbeauty Updated Mar 27, 2008

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    Parco Ducale
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    Well, Parco Ducale isn't actually off the beaten path, all you need is to cross the Verdi Bridge behind the Palace Pilotta. The park was wanted by Ottavio Farnese who entrusted to the architect Jacopo Barrozzi detto Vignola to design his summer residence. At that time, of course, the bridge across Torrente and the park were closed for the public visitors. During the reign of Marie Louise the park was opened to the public and in 1866, under the Savoia rule, it became the Municipal Park. In the very beginning of the 20th century the entrance to the Verdi Bridge was opened and the bastions were demolished.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Defending tower

    by croisbeauty Updated Mar 27, 2008

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    defending tower
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    This is the only defending tower left after the bastions around Parco Ducale were demolished in 1905. The tower is located across the Verdi Bridge, left of the main entrance to the park. It has typical and recognizable structure like most of the others defending towers which can be seen in the northern parts of Italy, strong but yet decorative.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Chiesa di San Antonio Abate

    by croisbeauty Updated Mar 27, 2008

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    Chiesa di San Antonio Abate

    Via della Repubblica is the main street in the historic centre of Parma, connecting eastern part of the town and Piazza Garibaldi. There are couple of significant sights in this street, the church of San Sepolcro and the palace Rangoni Farnese in the first place.
    The church of San Antonio Abate is almost hidden, interpolated among the other buildings there. It was established in 1402 by the monks of San Antonio but than reconstructed in 1712 by the design of Fedinando Bibiena. At first sight, both outside and inside aspects, one does not realize it is a sacral place.

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  • oriettaIT's Profile Photo

    Azienda Sperimentale Stuard

    by oriettaIT Updated Sep 6, 2012

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    Chili variety
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    I went to Parma outskirt to visit a special Farm. The Azienda Sperimentale Stuard is the result of years of study about chili peppers. Right now they have over 500 variety of peppers, for cooking or just for decoration.
    They have a huge online catalogue from where to order plants or seeds and twice a year, in May and in October they organize a special event to meet their customers and show to everybody willing to know more about chili their so called "catalogue field", a big square of land where a few plants of each variety is planted. They have the most hot chili in the world here and every year several chili experts come here to check out the newelty.
    The owner put a lot of passion in his work and every year select new variety and nurture them.
    The field is a fantastic explosion of colors and shapes and it is a joy to explore.
    At the farm is possible to buy chili's seeds, chili fruits, wonderful compositions of chili and several different products made, of course, of chili. We saw salsa of various kind, bruschetta spread and even grappa made out of chili.
    In 2012 the Chili festival will be held Sunday 14 October.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Farm Stay
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Monumento a Vittorio Bottego

    by call_me_rhia Written May 28, 2010

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    This monument, dating back to 1907 is dedicated to Vittorio Bottego and was created by the artist Ettore Ximenes, who was a personal friend of Bottego.

    Bottego was a Parma-born explorer who spent much of his life in Africa, in places such as Eritre and Ethiopia in particular, where he died on 17 march1897.

    The statue is located in Piazzale Dalla Chiesa, very near the train station.

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  • JessieLang's Profile Photo

    Museo del Parmigiano Reggiano

    by JessieLang Updated Oct 23, 2011

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    Poster
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    Go to Sorogna, very near Parma, to visit the Museo del Parmigiano Reggiano. It is located in an 18th Century cheese factory on the grounds of an old castello. They showed a film on the traditional way of making cheese, and then gave us a tour of a modern process. It takes 600 liters of milk to make one big wheel of cheese!

    Naturally, they have a sales shop to visit at the end of the tour

    Open weekends, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., from March to early December.
    Entry: 5 Euro

    c/o Corte Castellazzi,
    Via Volta, 5
    Soragna (Northwest of Parma)

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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  • lichinga's Profile Photo

    The montain area South of...

    by lichinga Updated Sep 12, 2002

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    The montain area South of Parma is part of the Appennini range. It is an area of ondulated hills, though the highest peaks may reach more than 2,000 metres. The road across the Appennini is a winding one, as it now became a secundary route, as motorways took over the task of receiving the heavy traffic.

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  • lichinga's Profile Photo

    Salsomaggiore is a very...

    by lichinga Written Sep 12, 2002

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    Salsomaggiore is a very important spa centres 30 km away from Parma, at the foot of the hills. It is not the spot illustrated in this picture, but a medium-sized town with several hotels of any possible category.

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  • 807Wheaton's Profile Photo

    Visit a Parmigiano-Reggiano Coop in Soragna

    by 807Wheaton Written Sep 26, 2012
    The aging cheese
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    We visited Caseificio Sociale "Pongennaro" in Soragna to see how Parmigiano Reggiano is made.
    About 15 farmers have joined together to make this product. It can only be called Parmgiano Reggiano if the cows are from here, the cheese is made here and ages here. Then it is certified as the real deal. We enjoyed seeing all the processes and bought a nice sample of cheese. Parmigiano Cheese is aged three years and the outside of the container gets darker as it ages.
    This is in "the food valley" of the Po River. Lots of corn is grown here and an herb for the cows to eat to help their digestion for good milk production.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Food and Dining
    • Seniors

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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Castello di Torrechiara, Part I

    by von.otter Updated Mar 12, 2011
    Castello di Torrechiara, June 2010
    4 more images

    “I went on to Torrechiara, a tiny hamlet under a hill upon which stands a castle, which from a distance looks like an Aztec temple. Driving up to the castle of Torrechiara, I found to my disappointment that the postern gate was locked.”
    — from “A Traveller in Italy” 1964 by Henry Vollam Morton (1892-1979)

    This spectacular castle in the Province of Parma, but not in Parma proper, is the venue for many summer events, chief among them is the Torrechiara Festival. The castle sits at 912 feet above sea level, encircled by high walls, at the summit of a terraced and cultivated hill on the left bank of the River Parma, and on the main road to Langhirano, the center of the Province’s prosciutto production.

    Because the surrounding countryside is flat, agricultural land (see photo #4) the castello at Torrechiara can be seen from afar.

    The difference between a castello and a rocca is its location. When a castle is located on a hill/mountain it is called a castello. When it is located on flat ground, in a town, it is called a rocca.

    One of the outstanding attractions at Torrechiara are its many richly frescoed rooms (see photo #5 for a detailed example).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Castello di Torrechiara, Part II

    by von.otter Updated Mar 12, 2011
    Castello di Torrechiara, June 2010
    4 more images

    “In the Parma district, Pier Maria Rossi was active, having received, it is said, a substantial sum from Venice in order that he might harass the Duke of Milan. These various campaigns produced heavy losses on both sides, although marsh fevers proved more formidable foes than the forces of the enemy.”
    — from “A History of Milan under the Sforza” 1907 by Cecilia Mary Ady and Edward Armstrong

    A fortified building is first talked about at Torrechiara in 1259. At that time, Parma’s mayor ordered that it be demolished and, two years later this same mayor forbid its reconstruction. Despite this obstacle, the current castello was built between 1448 and 1460 by the powerful Count Pier Maria Rossi. Successfully combining defensive and residential purposes, this castello remains one of the most brilliant and aesthetically pleasing sights of its kind in the Parma area.

    The powerfully built walls, shown in these photos, of the castello give some idea of its successful defensive purposes.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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Parma Off The Beaten Path

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