Historical centre, Rimini

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  • Exterior (2)
    Exterior (2)
    by gordonilla
  • Signage
    Signage
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  • The Fish Market (2)
    The Fish Market (2)
    by gordonilla
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    tempio malatestiano

    by xaver Updated Sep 7, 2010

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    tempio malatestiano

    Originally this was a romanic style church, untill Sigismondo Malatesta transformed this church in a real monument. The external side is made by Leon Battista Alberti and it's very carateristic the facade that is unfinished in the higher part.
    Inside the main attractions are a Giotto's crucifix and and a Piero della Francesca's fresco where Sigismondo Malatesta is painted kneeling in front of the saint Sigismondo.

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    the historical centre

    by xaver Updated Sep 7, 2010

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    cavour square

    A walk of no more than one hour, lets you discover most of Rimini's central attractions, like Cavour square with its Pigna fountain and its palaces.This could be a short but nice itinerary, once you have the railway station behind, take the street in front of you and keep going stratight on untill you find Piazza tre Martiri, then if you go left you go to the Augustus Arch, instead if you go right you will meet first Piazza Cavour(the one in the picture) and further Tiberio's bridge.

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    The Galliana Gate (Torrione dei Cavalieri)

    by gordonilla Written Jul 9, 2010

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    Exterior (1)
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    I came across this architectural gem quite by chance as I was walking back to the railway station.

    The gateway dates from the 1200s, and it was used to link the city with the harbour along the River Marecchia. It was also part of the defensive wall during the 13h century by Frederick II. It was a replacement for an earlier gate which was closer to the city.

    It was restored in the 15th century by Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta (1417-1468). In the early 1900s there were Maltesta coins discovered during excavations.

    The gateway was closed in the 16th century and was replaced by a tower - the Knight's Tower.

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    The Fish Market

    by gordonilla Written Jul 7, 2010

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    The Fish Market (1)
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    Located on Piazza Cavour; you will see the Fish Market across the piazza from Palazzo dell'Arengo is the 18th century fish market. The original stone counters, the waterspots for cleaning fish and the clock are all still present.

    It was a pleasant structure to explore and was cool inside.

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    Piazza Cavour

    by gordonilla Written Jul 6, 2010

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    During medieval times this was the centre of town life. The Arengo Palazzo from 1204 is located here, complete with Swallowtail battlements and an arcade.

    There is a statue of Pope Paul V from 1614 and the fountain of the pine cone - the pine cone was added in 1809; a statue of St Paul had been placed there during restoration work in 1545.

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    Piazza Tre Martiri

    by gordonilla Written Jul 6, 2010

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    Piazza (1)
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    The Piazza marks the position of the Roman forum. This was the centre of Civic life for the Latin speaking citizens of Rimini. At that time the square was much larger than it is today.

    On one side there is a statue of Julius Caesar.

    In the honour of three partisans who died in 1944, the square has been named "Tre Martiri".

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    Palazzi at Piazza Cavour

    by Airpunk Updated Dec 16, 2006

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    Palazzo Garampi
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    Around Piazza Cavour, you will find a couple of medieval and renaissance palaces. They are used by the city administrations or by cultural institutions.

    Palazzo del Podestà: The facade of this 1334-built palace is predominantly gothic, although more modern styles found its way into the Palazzo after the nearby Palazzo Garampi was built in the early 17th century. The most impressive thing are the three big gothic arches. Palazzo del Podestà is mainly used as a place for exhibitions.

    Palazzo dell'Arengo: This palace was built in 1204, with mostly gothic elemnts, but also with some romanesque. It is situated right to Pallazzo del Podestá and seems to form an unity with this building. Both look far larger than they really are.

    Palazzo Garampi: This palace is the most modern, built in 1687 and is now the major's office. Following the completition of this palace, the facades of the neighbouring two were slightly altered. Palazzo Garampi stands on the place of a 16th century palace which was destroyed after an earthquake in 1672 - right to the Palazzo dell'Arengo. All three palaces were restored in the early 20th century after an earthquake.

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    Piazza Cavour: Fish market gate, fountain and pope

    by Airpunk Updated Dec 16, 2006

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    Pescheria Vecchia and Fontanella della Pigna
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    Piazza Cavour is one of the main squares in the city center with a couple of sights:

    The Fontanella della pigna (pine cone fountain) form the 19th century is one of two structures in the middle of this square. The other one is the statue of Pope Paul V from 1614. This gave Piazza Cavous its nickname "Piazza del Papa" - "pope square". There is a market on the square taking place twice a week.

    The Pescheria Vecchia (old fish market) was built in 1747. It's arcades are part of a small street now and are used to sell almost everything - except fish. Not the small ornaments and fountains when you walk through the pescheria.

    Around the square you will find also a couple of renaissance palaces like Palazzo del Podesta or Palazzo Garampi. To get more information about them, please read my tip about the Palazzi at Piazza Cavour.

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    Roman amphitheatre

    by Airpunk Written Dec 11, 2006

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    Roman Amphiteatre

    Rimini's roman amphitheatre is said to be the only one still existant in the Emiglia-Romana and - although not nearly as large as Rome's Colosseum - one of the largest ever built. Today, only ruins can be seen of it, but that doesn't meen that you should skip it on your way trough Rimini. The theatre was built in the 2nd century offered space for more than 10 000 people. Excavations are still taking place here, but the theatre is being prepared to be opened to a wider public.

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    Tempio Malatestiano

    by Airpunk Updated Dec 11, 2006

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    Tempio Malatestiano
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    This former 13th century franciscan church was redesigned in 1450 by order of Sigismondo Malatesta, head of the Malatesta family which reigned Rimini in the late middle ages. Malatesta wanted all gothic elements to be removed or hidden and implement romanesque and renaissance elements. This architectural change of styles and the use of bright colours make the temple look like to be from another place. Malatesta turned the church into a monument for his family and an interesting example for medieval and early renaissance architecture. Most of the artowrks in the interior are placed in honour of the Malatestas. Worth to mention is “Giotto’s crucifix” from 1312. The temple was damaged during WWII but restored shortly after.

    Note the second picture to see a glimpse of the former gothic style.

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    Oratorio di San Girolamo

    by Airpunk Updated Dec 11, 2006
    Oratorio di San Girolamo

    Once a baroque clerical complex built in 1782, the Oratorio of San Girolamo was destroyed in wolrd war II leaving two chapels. Only these two red chapels, looking like gate houses, still remain. The Oratorio of San Girolamo was once house to the painting “San Girolamo nel Deserto del Guercino” which is now in the Chiesa of Santi Bartolomeo e Marino.

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    Clock tower of Piazza Tre Martiri

    by Airpunk Updated Nov 11, 2006

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    The clocktower at the Piazza Tre Martiri

    Being at a main square, this clock tower looks to be part of a town hall - but it's just a simple clocktower. A beautiful clocktower! The "Torre dell'Orologio" was built in 1547 and rebuilt again in 1753. Another rebuilding was needed in 1875 after an eartquake which destroyed a larger part of the tower. The upper face is a normal one while the lower shows zodiac signs and lunar constellations.

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    Piazza dei Tre Martiri

    by Airpunk Written Nov 10, 2006

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    Ceasar, hidden behind an election stand

    The Square of the three martyrs is probably the heart of the old town. Once, the old roman forum was located at this place, later the quare was divided into Piazza Giulio Cesare (Juilius Cesar Suqare) and Piazza delle Erbe. After WWII, it was merged into one square again and named Piazza Tre Martiri to commemorate three young Partisans which were exceuted there. In the second half of the 20th century, excavations took place revealing more secrets from roman time.

    Many interesting buildings and mounments are found here. The old clock tower, the Chiesa dei Paolotti and St. Anthony's chapel, some places where you can get an idea of the roman ruins and many more things. A Statue of Julius Ceasar, a 1933 bronze copy of a roman statue, is placed on the northern side of the square.

    Today, the usual things that go on on a central square, take place here. This includes markets, promotion actions, etc.

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    Tempietto di Sant'Antonio

    by Airpunk Updated Nov 10, 2006

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    St. Anthony's chapel and Chiesa dei Paolotti
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    This small chapel, situated in front of the Chiesa dei Paolotti, was built between 1675 and 1678. The chapel was built on that place where a mircale probably took place in the early 13th century. Some people don't wanted to believe that the body of chirst is contained in the holy host. St. Anthony asked the leader of the non-believers, a man called Bonillo, if he yould believe it, if his mule adores the holy host. A couple of days later, a host and a staple of barley were presented to the mule. Bonillo tried to trick St. Anthony by starving the mule for two days, but the mule first kneed before the host and did not get up to eat the barley until St. Anthony allowed him. Bonillo converted and started to spread christianity together with St. Anthony. At least, that's the story.

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    Medieval city walls

    by Airpunk Updated Nov 10, 2006

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    Some of the city walls
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    The part of the park which stretches along the Via Bastioni Orientali contains parts of the medeival city walls. Perhaps that is the only positive thing to say about this park as it looks to be in a very sad state. It is surely not the most beautiful park I have seen. Most of the medieval structures are not preserved and are still rotting away. Rimini has many places which are more beuatiful than this, but it is sad to see that this part is not kept well.

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