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Most Viewed Favorites in Friuli-Venezia Giulia

  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    FOOD & WINE

    by Pinat Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Favorite thing: I believe it is due to the historic background of the region but in Friuli Venezia Giulia can you find such a variety of flavours and aromas. San Daniele ham, wines from the vineyards of Friuli and some less well-known grape species are some of the specialities of the region.

    There are 9 D.O.C. zones in Friuli Venezia Giulia where D.O.C.G. wines are produced, including robust red wines such as Ramandolo and Picolit, the strangely-named Tazzelenghe and a unique range of world famous white wines. I don't know much about wine but I had the chance to visit some of the wine cellars and discover the hospitality of the “D.O.C.” wine producers during a school trip:)

    Picture from web
    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Tetreus's Profile Photo

    The Friulian language

    by Tetreus Written Mar 6, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Friulian (friulano in Italian, furlan or affectionately marilenghe in Friulian) is a Romance language belonging to the Rhaetian family, spoken in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of north-east Italy. Friulian has around 600,000 speakers, the vast majority of whom also speak Italian.

    It is sometimes called Eastern Ladin, since it comes from the same roots as the Ladin Language, although over the centuries it has diverged, under the influence of surrounding languages, including German, Italian, Venetian, and Slovenian.

    Documents in Friulian are attested from the 11th century, and poetry and literature dating as far back as 1300. By the 20th century there was a revival of interest in the language, which has continued to this day.

    Fondest memory: Nowadays, Friulian is officially recognized in Italy with the law 482/1999, which protects linguistic minorities; therefore teaching of Friulian has been introduced in many primary schools.

    An online newspaper is active, and there are also a few musical groups which use Friulian for their songs, as well as some theatrical companies. In about 40 per cent of the communities in the Province of Udine, road signs are both in Friulian and Italian.

    There is also an official translation of the Holy Bible. In 2005, a famous brand of beer used Friulian for one of its commercials.

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    The climate

    by Tetreus Written Jun 9, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Friuli-Venezia Giulia has a humid, temperate climate, which varies considerably from one area to another.

    The Alpine system protects it from the direct impact of the rigid northerly winds, but the region, open toward the Po Valley, is influenced by the general circulation of air masses from west to east. Along this direction, the low pressure centres develop and move, bringing with them thunderstorms and hailstorms, especially during the summer months, but also at times in the spring and autumn.

    Because it is open to the Adriatic Sea, the territory also receives sirocco winds, which bring with them heavy rainfall. The Carso plateau has its own special weather and climate: the masses of cold air coming from the east cross over the low Julian Alps, and so this area is affected by winds coming from the region of the Danube.

    The "bora", (northeasterly wind), reaches its maximum intensity in Trieste and its Gulf, with gusts that sometimes exceed 150 km per hour.

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    The Friulian flag

    by Tetreus Updated Mar 6, 2006

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    Favorite thing: The Flag of Friuli is an historical flag of the region Friuli, which isn't recognized officially today. It shows a yellow eagle, whose sight is directed towards right and that have flying wings, on blue background.

    History and meaning
    Its origin goes back to the Patrie dal Friûl, the historical Friulian state that was independent from 1077 till 1420 under the control of Patriarch of Aquileia; the official flag of this state was the same, apart for the colours: the eagle was golden, while the background was light blue; it was used in all the normal contests, painted on buildings and walls.

    The symbol of the flag comes from the name of Aquileia, which, following a popular legend, comes from an eagle (Latin: aquila) who showed to the first citizens the place where the city should have been founded; today, though, many scholars claim that the name of Aquileia come from a Celtic toponym (Akylis), and therefore has nothing to do with eagles.

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    The new Friulian flag

    by Tetreus Written Mar 6, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Today, the flag can be seen in many places, especially on 3 April, a day which remembers the old Friulian state, although it isn't recognized officially and some think it is a nationalistic or indipendentist symbol. The flag of the present day Italian region Friuli-Venezia Giulia is based on this flag too.

    Sometimes also other layouts of the flags are used, which keeps the colours (blue and yellow), but without the eagle; those version are not much popular, though

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    Friuli in the world

    by Tetreus Written Mar 6, 2006

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    Favorite thing: Friuli was until the 1960s an area of deep poverty, causing a large number of Friulian speakers to emigrate. Most went to France, Belgium, and Switzerland or outside Europe, to Canada, Australia, Argentina, Brazil, the United States, and South Africa. In these countries there are associations of Friulian immigrants (called Fogolâr furlan) that try to protect their traditions and language.

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  • Andreja86's Profile Photo

    Not many tourists

    by Andreja86 Written Mar 26, 2011

    Favorite thing: In June, July and August you'll se many tourist in cities like Lignano and Grado.
    But you wont see that many tourists in cities like San Daniele, Pordenone, Triste, Udine and Muggia.

    I visited Friuli for two weeks in July and August and didn't see that many tourists and if you visit some of the more smaller towns on mondays you'll see that a lot of the shops and restaurants are closed and therefore there are even fewer tourists.

    Why so few tourists? I don't know, actully. I find this region of Italy very exciting and there are so many places to discover. Many of the tourists looking for the same thing that Friuli offers tend to visit tuscany instead and many of the visitors in Lignano and Grado will not visit other towns during their vacation.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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