Gorizia Travel Guide

  • Things to Do
    by Avieira67
  • Things to Do
    by Avieira67
  • Things to Do
    by Avieira67

Gorizia Highlights

  • Pro
    Mikebond profile photo

    Mikebond says…

     it combines three souls and it is full of trees 

  • Con
    Pinat profile photo

    Pinat says…

     Not well promoted like Trieste or Udine 

  • In a nutshell
    shiran_d profile photo

    shiran_d says…

     Can relax and enjoy the food and relaxed life style 

Gorizia Things to Do

  • Duomo di Sant'Ilario e Taziano

    It is believed that this Cathedral began its existence in the 1200s as a small place of worship next to which the graves of city notables were added during the 14th century in a Funerary Chapel in Gothic style. By 1525 there was a presbytery and a central nave. The church was gradually embellished with many murals and works of art that are still...

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  • Palazzo Attems-Santa Croce

    This historic structure was built in 1740 by the architect Nicolò Pacassi, but the only parts of the original structure that remain are the foundations/layout and some parts of the building facing towards the gardens. It underwent massive restoration during the 19th and 20th centuries, when neo-Classical elements were introduced to the façade of...

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  • Chiesa di Sant’Ignazio

    In my opinion, it is the most exquisite cathedral in Gorizia. The construction of this church was started in mid-1600s and the masterpiece, with unique onion-shaped domes, was completed in mid-18th century. The aisle leading to the main altar is divided into small side chapels, each decorated with interesting murals.

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  • Jewish Heritage in Gorizia

    The synagogue of Gorizia was destroyed during World War II and later reopened in 1947 by Jewish American soldiers stationed in the town. It was remodeled in 1984 is currently an oratory named after Abraham Vita Reggio and home to the Gorizia Central European Institute of Hebrew studies. The museum next door is often referred to as "Little Jerusalem...

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  • Castello di Gorizia

    Castello di Gorizia (Gorizia Castle) is from the 11th century along with a chapel a few years later. Once the centre of administrative activity, today it is the main tourist attraction of the town. It is in the old part of the city with houses just as old. It is made of stone and even has dungeons.The castle is furnished with medieval furniture,...

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  • Piazza Transalpina

    This is the first piazza you will see in Gorizia if you come by train as the central railway station is located here. Piazza Transalpina is of great significance to both Gorizia and Nova Goricia. When the town was divided, the railway station went to Nova Goricia while the hotel of the railway station fell on the side of Italy. Since 2004, there...

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  • Piazza Transalpina

    This tip deals with the most touching moments of my visit to Gorizia, because "I am Europa" and the Piazza Transalpina ("Transalpine square") has become the symbol of the European reunification started on 1st May 2004, when eight Central and Eastern European countries, including Slovenija, joined the European Union.The square lies where the Iron...

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  • Parco della Rimembranza

    Parco della Rimembranza ("Park of Remembering") is the worth seeing place I mostly enjoyed in Gorizia after the Piazza Transalpina, although neither is a church or a museum.I liked this park for being right in the centre of the town, close to the beautiful Corso Italia, and for the statues and inscriptions to remember the local soldiers who died in...

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  • Sinagoga

    The synagogue was built in 1756 and restored in 1984. It is open to the public, but I didn't visit it. The ground floor hosts the Museo di Gerusalemme sull'Isonzo ("Museum of Jerusalem on the Isonzo"), about the town community and its protagonists. One of them was linguist Graziadio Isaia Ascoli (1829-1907), who invented the names of Tre Venezie...

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  • Palazzo Attems Petzenstein

    Palazzo Attems Petzenstein projected by Nicolò Pacassi, was built for Sigismondo d'Attems (Sigmund of Attems) between 1733 and 1745. Inside, one can visit the provincial art gallery with paintings by local artists, mostly of the 18th century. Unfortunately, I didn't visit it, but I hope I'll go there next time.

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  • Chiesa di Sant'Ignazio

    The chiesa di Sant'Ignazio is one of the most relevant baroque monuments in the area. Works for its construction started in 1654 and lasted one century.The façade is impressing: in the middle appears the statue of Saint Ignatius of Loyola with his schield and the monogramme IHS. The interior is as amazing. You should visit it at any cost! Meanwhile...

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  • Piazza della Vittoria

    Piazza della Vittoria ("Victory square") lies in front of the chiesa di Sant'Ignazio. Originally, this area was covered with grass, thus it was called Travnik in Slovene, i.e. "meadow".Here you see the fountain with Neptun and the Tritons, by Marco Chiereghin on Nicolò Pacassi's design (1756), restored in 2001.

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  • Castello

    Here is the medieval castle of Gorizia. I wanted to visit the inside, but I couldn't find the entrance! However, the outside is very beautiful, too, and you can enjoy a beautiful panorama from there.

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  • Chiesa di Santo Spirito

    The little chiesa di Santo Spirito was built between 1398 and 1414 and restored in 1988. It provides an important example of late Gothic architecture when the Venetian style met the Nordic influence.I took two picture of the inside from outside because the church was close. The painting above the high altar depicts an Assumption by a Venetian...

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  • Musei provinciali di Borgo Castello

    Three provincial museums are located in Borgo Castello: the Museo della Grande Guerra ("Museum of World War I") and the Archaeological collection in the Taxis' house, as well as the Museo della moda e delle arti applicate ("Museum of mode and applied arts"). I photographed the two buildings that host the museums, that I didn't visit for lack of...

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  • Borgo Castello - Porta Leopoldina

    Borgo Castello is the ancient part of the town, with the castle. You enter it through the Porta Leopoldina, a gate in the walls that were erected between the 16th and the 18th century. The gate was built when Emperor Leopold 1st visited Gorizia in 1660, as the two-headed eagle on the main arch testifies.

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  • Gabriele D'Annunzio

    If you walk from the centre to Borgo Castello, as I did, you'll pass across Via D'Annunzio and, before the gate to the castle, you'll see this statue of the great Italian poet and intellectual Gabriele d'Annunzio (1863-1938). During the First World War, he led some military operations in the Carso (Kras/Karst) and in Fiume (today Rijeka in...

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  • Duomo

    The Duomo is dedicated to Ilario and Taziano, patron saints of the town. It originated from the union of the churches of Saint Ilario and of Saint Acazio. It became a cathedral in 1752 and was restored many times in the 19th and 20th centuries.You should visit the inside of the Duomo, because it is very rich, as you can see in my Travelogue.

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Gorizia Hotels

See all 6 Hotels in Gorizia

Gorizia Restaurants

  • Tasty Chinese food

    This place is not a restaurant, it is a take away outlet.It is owned by a chinese family that live in Gorizia since more than 10 years.They prepare excellent, cheap and tasty chinese dishes.It is a good option if you are passing by Gorizia, and seeking a budget good meal. Try the Riso con curry (Rice with curry)and Pollo con mandorla - Chicken...

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  • Go for Pasta and Local Wine!

    Maybe it was because we had friends working there but this place was always like a family trattoria for us whenever we were in Gorizia. They offer varieties from Italian cuisine. The service is really fast (not because of friends:) and they have good local wine. They bring it in very nice bottles:) All kinds of pasta (Penne alla carbonara being my...

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  • One of the best Pizzas in town

    Tre Stelle (meaning 3 stars) is an excellent restaurant located in the outskirts of the border town of Gorizia, they have also a bed and breakfast facility.Their Pizza is among the best in town, very tasty and huge size as well.My favourite is the Pizza con funghi e mozzarella di bufala ( Pizza with mushrooms and buffalo mozzarella)Price is...

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Gorizia Transportation

  • Buses

    Although Gorizia is a small town, it has a good bus network. Line 1 goes from the railway station to the Piazza Transalpina and circulates every 10 minutes. There is also an international bus line connecting Gorizia to Nova Gorica, but it passes every 30 minutes, I think, and it's more expensive.

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  • Crossing to Slovenia

    If you want to cross to Slovenia on foot, do NOT ask drivers about where you can cross, especially if you are on the road coming in from the station. The crossing from Italy to Slovenia by car is outside of the city and requires a good hour of walking along the side of highways from Gorizia station to Nova Gorica station. It is far better to simply...

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  • Come by train

    Gorizia lies on the railway line Trieste-Udine and is also connected to the Slovenian network. However, there are no more passengers trains from Gorizia to Slovenija, unlike what the panel in the last photo says. You can take them at the Nova Gorica station, which is not very far.The station looks old from outside, but inside it's quite new. It...

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Gorizia Local Customs

  • Mikebond's Profile Photo

    by Mikebond Updated Jun 24, 2005

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    Nearly everybody in Gorizia can speak more than one language.
    People speak not only Italian and dialect but, unlike in Trieste, many of them speak also Slovene. Actually, they are forced to know this language because nowadays Gorizia and Nova Gorica are turning into one single town and both Slovenians and Italians often cross the border. However, the two communities live close but separate, they aren't as mixed as in Trieste.
    It is even more unfrequent than in Trieste to meet a local who doesn't speak dialect. On the contrary, it is more difficult to find someone who speak a very good Italian. The same happens in Trieste, Venezia and other towns in Veneto, where everybody speak dialect, too.

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Gorizia Warnings and Dangers

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    by Mikebond Updated Jul 2, 2005

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    An Italian law forbids to let one's dog defecate on public meadows, but I had never seen such a warning sign as this one, which informs you that if your dog defecates on the grass, you must collect his crap if you don't want to be fined.

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Gorizia Off The Beaten Path

  • San Giusto

    I photographed this little church while walking from the railway station to the centre. I saw it by chance, since wasn't even mentioned on my guide. Despite not being famous, it is very nice, isn't it? Unfortunately, it was close.I asked its name on the forum in June 2005 and I had lost any hope to get an answer. Finally, today 16th August 2006, VT...

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  • Ossuary

    That big white building on the picture is an ossuary, a monument of first world war. Inside the ossuary bones of 100.000 fallen soldiers are placed.This monument is just north of Gorizia, some 5 km by road.

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  • Gorizia Hotels

    6 Hotels in Gorizia

    28 Reviews and Opinions

Gorizia Favorites

  • Pinat's Profile Photo

    by Pinat Updated Jul 9, 2009

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    Favorite thing: Gorizia is a pretty city in the region of Friuli-Venezia-Giulia in northeastern Italy. The city is located at the junction of the Isonzo and Vipava Valleys. Unlike the neighbouring city of Trieste, Gorizia is sheltered from the north wind of cold Bora by a mountain ridge. That is why the city has a mild Mediterranean climate throughout the year.

    Gorizia was part of the Austro Hungarian Empire till the First World War, when it was taken by Italy. From 1943-1945 it was administered by the Germans. After the Second World War the town of Gorizia was divided between Italy and Slovenia. In 1948, Tito ordered the construction of Nova Goricia (New Gorizia) on the Slovenian side. With the division of the town, families too were divided.

    In 2004, when Slovenia entered the EU, the border between the two countries was abolished and the town was reunited. Today the people of Gorizia and Nova Gorizia are now striving to establish a common identity, this time under EU banner.

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