Fun things to do in Friuli-Venezia Giulia

  • Portico Lippomano
    Portico Lippomano
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  • Piazza Matteotti
    Piazza Matteotti
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  • MIRAMARE Castle
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Friuli-Venezia Giulia

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    GORIZIA

    by Pinat Written Jul 13, 2009

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    It's the city I visited most after Trieste. I totally loved her because in Trieste you smell Slovenia but in Gorizia you smell and see and hear and feel Slovenia. It's like you are there but still you know you are still in Italy. It was such a great experience for a person like me considering where I come from or where I live: From Ankara, I don't know how many kilometers you should go to reach a border, in Izmir you have to swim across but in Gorizia, speak/eat/listen/feel whichever you choose: Italian fine, Slovenian, no problem still fine: Oh, these people definitely have two souls, one body and such a great heart...

    Further details are on my Gorizia pages

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces

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    TRIESTE

    by Pinat Updated Jul 13, 2009

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    Of course I'm gonna start with Trieste because ...
    ... she's the one and only city in Italy where I had "home"
    ... she has such a unique wind, Bora
    ... she is like the city where all the winds on earth come together and go in their directions, she is like the meeting place for all the winds
    ... she hosts Barcolana
    ... I have unforgetable memories in every corner
    ... I know it's not the days or the weeks or the years that should be counted, it is the memories you accumulated, the friends you made and the emotions you went through...

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Family Travel

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    Venezia Giulia - overview

    by Mikebond Updated Aug 15, 2008

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    The cultural and historic region Venezia Giulia is made up by the provinces of Trieste and Gorizia takes up only a little part of the administrative region.
    The common features of these provinces are:
    - the Venetian-Triestine dialect that almost everyone speaks. Many people still learn it as mother language, which proves to be a problem when they grow up and cannot speak good Italian;
    - their lasting belonging to the Habsburg empire of Österreich-Ungarn, ended only in 1918, which makes them "less Italian" than the Friulan provinces. Some old people in Trieste still regret they don't belong to Österreich any longer;
    - the presence of a considerable Slovene community. However, the relations between the two peoples are not the same in the two towns: in Trieste, they live mixed together, which sometimes causes tensions and intolerance, due to the past memories that are still alive in both communities; on the contrary, in Gorizia, they are constantly in touch but live more separate (because of the edification of Nova Gorica in former Jugoslavija), which makes the cohabitation easier. The fact that most Italians in Gorizia can speak Slovenian (while most Italians in Trieste cannot) provides an even better evidence of the more United-Europe atmosphere existing in this town.

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    Venezia Giulia - Trieste

    by Mikebond Updated Feb 15, 2008

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    Trieste, with something more than 200,000 inhabitants, is the capital city of the cultural region Venezia Giulia and of the administrative region Friùli-Venezia Giulia. It is the most multicultural city, due to (or thanks to) its position and history. It was founded by the Romans, then it belonged to the Austrian empire until 1918, when it became Italian; it was administrated by the American troops after WWII and returned to Italia only in 1954.
    I cannot list all the monuments one should visit there, thus read my Trieste page.

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    Taking a bath in the river Tagliamento

    by Tetreus Written Sep 7, 2006

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    Maybe it sounds strange to you, but the Friulian people really take a bath in the river Tagliamento.

    The Tagliamento starts high up in the mountains, at il passo della Mauria at 1195 m sealevel and flows into the Adriatic Sea.

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    Venezia Giulia - Gorizia

    by Mikebond Updated Jun 4, 2006

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    Gorizia has 35,000 inhabitants and is located on the borderline with Slovenija. Actually, its extension was much bigger before WWII, but afterwards a part of the town was given to Jugoslavija and the two parts of the town were divided through the Iron Curtain.
    Gorizia belonged to the Austrian Empire until 1918, like Trieste. That is why its architecture can remind you of Wien and Österreich.
    The most worth seeing attractions in Gorizia are, in my opinion, the Duomo, the church of Saint Ignatius and the Piazza Transalpina, but the Parco della Rimembranza is also very charming. You can read about them in my Gorizia page.

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    Friùli (Friùl) - Udine

    by Mikebond Updated Jun 4, 2006

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    I certainly don't exaggerate if I say that Udine is Friùl and Friùl is Udine. Whenever you think of Friùli, you connect it to this town with around 100,000 inhabitants, maybe because it is the biggest regional town after Trieste, maybe because it is the largest province of the region, maybe because Pordenone was in the province of Udine, too, before getting the status of province.
    Udine is a typical Venetian town, as you can realize if you see the Piazza della Libertà with all its Venetian monuments: the Loggia del Lionello, the Porticato di San Giovanni and, of course, Saint Mark's lion. Worth visiting are also the Duomo and the Civici Musei, the museums of archaeology and ancient paintings located in the castle. To learn more about this beautiful town, visit my Udine page.

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    NONINO - GRAPA PLEASURE FOR EYE N THROAT

    by FRONA Updated Apr 24, 2006

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    Thirty years ago Benito and Giannola Nonino revolutionized the way of producing and presenting Grappa in Italy and around the world. It was the
    birth of single varietal Grappa, Monovitigno® Nonino, in which the pomace
    of Picolit grapes is distilled separately. Their success was so great that most
    Italian and foreign producers felt compelled to follow the Nonino model.

    Sep. 6, 2003 The Nonino Collection is enriched by a new jewel, designed by Luca Cendali and
    hand-blown by Venini in Murano, with very old traditional craftsmanship in the
    “incalmo” style in two colours which represent the symbols of Yin and Yang, the
    two
    forces which are the component parts in the Creation of Universe.

    Dec. 4, 2003
    The President of the Republic, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, awards Giannola and
    Benito Nonino the prestigious “Leonardo Prize for Italian Quality” for the
    absolute quality level, research and innovations which characterize a brand that
    conveys to the outside world, above all, the importance of family and
    commitment to one’s work. The Noninos are well-known, true ambassadors for
    Italian Grappa throughout the world.

    Dec. 6, 2003 The New York Times chooses to dedicate its “Saturday Profile” section to the
    Nonino family on the occasion of the Thirtieth Anniversary of the creation of
    the Single-varietal Nonino Monovitigno Grappa.

    Dec. 6, 2003 The International Herald Tribune dedicates a whole article “A Dynamo and her
    Daughters turn leftovers to Gold” to the Nonino family and puts the article on
    the front page.

    1984-2004 Twenty years of the Grape Distillate ÙE® which was created by Nonino
    in 1984. Ministerial Authorization for the production of Grape Distillate (D.M.
    20.10.84) was granted following a specific request by the Noninos, after
    overcoming all sorts of bureaucratic and category-related obstacles. The success
    of this distillate over the years has been such that it has persuaded both Italian
    and foreign distillers to follow the Nonino model.

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Trek

    by Fabanna Written Mar 4, 2006

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    There are many routes you can take, starting from Erto or from other villages. We did a 4-hour walk above Erto. To arrive to the starting point we took the car, be careful because the road is very narrow and without any safety protection, on the right there is a deep burrow, so try not to look!
    Walking up there can be considered, but it is quite a long way and you should add further hours to the trip.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Backpacking

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    Visit the site of the Vajont dam

    by Fabanna Written Mar 4, 2006

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    on the 9th of October 1963, a landslide fell into Europe's largest dam and caused the death of thousands of people living in the villages nearby, which were completely submerged by a giant wave. The remains of that man-made tragedy are still there. It is impressive.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Friùli (Friùl) - overview

    by Mikebond Written Oct 23, 2005

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    The cultural and historic region of Friùli is made up of the two provinces of Udine and Pordenone and takes up by far the most of the administrative region Friùli-Venezia Giulia.
    The two provinces share many features, in particular:
    - they belonged to the Serenissima Repubblica di Venezia for many centuries before becoming Italian; you can easily understand that, because their squares have the statue of Saint Mark's lion;
    - their population speak Furlân (Friulan), which is not a dialect, but one of the official language of the region. The website of the region has also a section in lenghe furlane. However, the variant of Pordenone tends to the Venetian dialect.

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    Gondole

    by Rapand Written Nov 25, 2004

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    I am so sorry I did not get the opportunity to go on a gondole trip. So I recommand everybody else to do it, I have to go back sometime just because of this! It is a beautiful city, and you get to see a lot from a gondole ( I have heard :-( )

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Singles

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Friuli-Venezia Giulia Hotels

Top Friuli-Venezia Giulia Hotels

Trieste Hotels
751 Reviews - 1977 Photos
Udine Hotels
112 Reviews - 226 Photos
Trebiciano Hotels
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Lignano Sabbiadoro Hotels
77 Reviews - 239 Photos
Pordenone Hotels
12 Reviews - 42 Photos
Grado Hotels
51 Reviews - 123 Photos
Duino Hotels
19 Reviews - 89 Photos
Aviano Hotels
42 Reviews - 24 Photos
Lago del Predil Hotels
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Palmanova Hotels
26 Reviews - 52 Photos
Gorizia Hotels
31 Reviews - 109 Photos
Tarvisio Hotels
16 Reviews - 49 Photos
Spilimbergo Hotels
8 Reviews - 9 Photos
Sistiana Hotels
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San Vito al Tagliamento Hotels
1 Hotel

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Friuli-Venezia Giulia Things to Do

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