Unique Places in Trieste

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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Trieste

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    Tempio Mariano di Monte Grisa

    by Mikebond Written Oct 27, 2008

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    The Marian Temple rises on Mount Grisa, 350 m above sea level.
    Trieste's Archbishop had vowed to build a church to thank the Virgin for protecting the city during the 1945 German bombing. So, this temple was erected with donations from all Italian believers.
    The first stone was set on 19th September 1959, when the simulacrum of the Fatima Madonna arrived in Trieste. Today, a copy of it can be seen in the sanctuary.
    The construction of the sanctuary started in 1963 and ended in 1966. The church is huge and there is a two-flight staircase leading to a terrace from where people can enjoy a panorama on the Trieste gulf.

    Marian Sanctuary of Monte Grisa
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    Piazza della Libertà

    by Mikebond Written Jul 25, 2008

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    The square in front of the railway station is called Piazza della Libertà ("Freedom Square"). It is an enjoyable place thanks to the many trees that shades you during the hot Triestine summer. However, many people sit down on tha banks to drink and smoke, that is why I hardly ever stay there and prefer sitting inside the station, where smoking is forbidden.
    Beside the trees, a reason why you should have a look at Piazza della Libertà is the statue of Queen Elisabeth, also known as Sissi. Since Trieste belonged to the Austrian Empire until the end of WWI, many people still consider Emperor Franz Joseph and his wife Elisabeth as "heroes". It isn't rare to find some aged Triestines who think that everything worked better when Trieste was an Austrian city (at that time, it was the Empire's main port); moreover, every bookshop sells biographies about the two emperors in the section dedicated to Trieste's history.

    Monument to Queen Elisabeth Sissi sculptures sculptures trees
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    Piazza Vittorio Veneto

    by Mikebond Written Jul 25, 2008

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    The square in front of the Main Post Office was remade in 2004 when Trieste was a candidate to host the EXPO2008 (won by Zaragoza). An underground parking was built. The fountain located in the middle of the square is the Fontana dei Tritoni ("Tritons' fountain"), dating back to 1898. It had been moved during the works, but in the end it was set again at its originary place. The municipality provided the square with banks and flower pot holders; however, the plants didn't grow as expected (so as to cover the ugly supports) and it looks likely that the square will undergo another transformation in the future.

    Piazza Vittorio Veneto Tritons' fountain building on the square another building
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    Palazzo delle Poste

    by Mikebond Written Jul 25, 2008

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    The Main Post office was built by architect Friedrich Setz between 1890 and 1894. The building was meant to house the post and telegraph offices as well as the finance office. This division has remained until today: the side on Piazza Vittorio Veneto houses the Italian Post and part of the Ministry for Communications, while the Ministry for Finances is located on the other side of the building.
    The façade of the palace on Piazza Vittorio Veneto features a dripstone dividing it into two parts. Above the dripstone you see six huge columns in Ionic order.
    The third level is the most beautiful, with six statues representing Navigation, Railway, Commerce, Viticulture, Agriculture and Industry. At the very top of the façade there is a dormer-window with a clock. Above the window you see the statue of a postillion.
    The inside of the building is very impressive: a great staircase leads you to the main hall, with many counters on both sides.
    You can reach the palace by bus lines 5, 17, 24, 28 and 30.

    Palazzo delle Poste Post Office statues statues dormer window with postilion

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    Civico Museo Morpurgo.

    by Maurizioago Updated Jul 14, 2008

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    This palace was donated to the town by a wealthy family at the end of the XVIII century.

    Here you are offered a guided tour.

    When I visited this house it seemed to me like I was in another time.

    This museum is located in Via Imbriani, 5. It's in the historic center.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Climbing the Capitoline Hill

    by Ekaterinburg Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    This was about as far off the beaten track as I got in Trieste and I didn't know where I'd been until later when I checked the location on the map. Sounds strange but this is what happens when you wander without a plan. Sometimes you find things you wouldn't have found otherwise and sometimes you miss out on places you would have liked to see. In this instance I seem to have managed both. From Piazza Goldoni, a small street, Via Pellico, led to an intriguing structure that I couldn't walk away from without exploring. This appeared to be a gigantic set of steps cut into a hill with a tunnel spewing out cars, trucks and buses underneath it. I walked up to have a look and though intimidated by the height, decided I'd have a go anyhow. Eventually, I wheezed my way to the top of the steps and found myself on the narrow, cobbled Via Del Monte. From here I had panoramic views of the city but to my disapointment, discovered that I was nowhere near the 'real' top. Struggling on to the next level I arrived at the lower end of the Park of Remembrance and from here the views were even better. I was so winded and exhausted at that stage that I just sat admiring the views and didn't actually realise that a short walk would have brought me to Trieste's Castle on the Hill. An opportunity missed but for someone with respiratory problems, that was quite a climb and I think I'd about reached my limit. It was only later that evening that I realised I'd actually climbed almost the whole way up the Capitoline Hill. If you have the energy for this the views are definitely worth it but it is a steep pull up.

    The last photo is of a 'Memory Stone' in the Park of Remembrance. There are formal monuments of course but these small stones were emebedded in the hillside, with just the name of the soldier concerned and his dates.

    Steps to The Capitoline on Via Pellico View from the steps Fiat Bambino on Via del Monte A Memory Stone in the Park of Remembrance
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    Monumento a Umberto Saba

    by mikey_e Written Sep 3, 2007

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    Umberto Saba is perhaps Trieste's most cherished native poet, despite being less famous than the city's other resident writer, James Joyce. Saba's life is reminiscent of the city of Trieste itself: the son of a Venetian father and a Jewish mother, Saba was born in Trieste in 1883, just after his father had deserted his mother. For three years, a Slovene neighbour acted as a surrogate father, but Saba's mother decided to move away from the neighbourhood and the young poet was raised by his mother and two aunts. He completed military service in Italy (Trieste was, at the time, Austro-Hungarian), an experience that shaped his poetry and led to his Versi militari. Saba did not just contribute to Trieste's poetic heritage, but his frequent nervous crises and bouts of depression made his an excellent candidate for Italy's budding psychoanalysts to develop their theory along the lines of Freud. Saba survived both World Wars (although he fled to Switzerland during the latter years of the Second World War) and died in 1957 in Gorizia, not far from his native city. Today there is a statue celebrating this poet in the Borgo Teresiano, near the back end of Sant'Antonio Nuovo.

    Monumento a Umberto Saba
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    Carnival in Trieste

    by paoseo Written Oct 7, 2006

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    During the Cranival time almost all young people move from Trieste to Muggia that is near the Slocenian border.
    There are clear signs that date back the Carnival of Muggia to 1420.
    The custom of permorf in the streets choreographies, masks and music is the result of the venetian influence on Muggia.All started again after WWI and II.
    There are 8 big groups born between 1939 and 1988 with different names as "BRIVIDO" (1946); "BORA" (1988); "BULLI E PUPE" (1954);"BELLEZZE NATURALI" (1952); "LAMPO" (1955);"MANDRIOI" (1971);"ONGIA" (1939);"TROTTOLA"(1967).

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    All year round thalassotherapy

    by Arcenciel Updated Jul 14, 2006

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    Thalassotherapy 'Aquamarina':

    An avant garde sports and rehabilitation centre with warm sea water

    10 minutes from Piazza Unita , is this thermal institution .
    It is a multi functional centre that opened in October 2000 and is equipped with a seawater swimming pool, rehabilitation services, gym, sauna, hydromassage hinalation and aerosol with seawater. This modern, comfortable building is linked to the national sanitary service and is also accessible to those who just want a swim.
    Swimming 5 euros, Sauna and Turkish Bath 5,80 euros. People of Trieste use to be naked into the sauna so don't wear a swimsuit, and avoid carefully to enter with shoes !

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    Miramare station

    by gmg61 Written Jul 9, 2006

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    Miramare station was built to serve the close up castle, built by Maximilian of Absburg.
    It's located along the railroad from Trieste to Venezia, but it is rarely used, and partially cnverted into a private house.
    Few trains stop there but you can visit it climbing to the old vllage from the Miramare castle.

    Staziuone di Miramare

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    Rozzol/Montebello: an old station

    by gmg61 Written Jul 9, 2006

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    An old and not anymore used station, along the "Transalpina" railroad that during the times of the Austrian empire connected Trieste with Wien.
    Nowadays it has been converted into a private house but if you're lucky enough and find the door open you can visit a small railroad museum located in the main hall of the station, and you can notice that almost everything has been left as it was 100 years ago, with writings in Italian and German, the old timetable and so on.
    Like jumping back in time!

    Stazione di Rozzol Montebello Rozzol Montebello, facade along railroad Rozzol Montebello: bilingual signs Rozzol Montebello:office of the chief The absburgic timetable

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    Kleine Berlin

    by Sunnyspring Written Jun 24, 2006

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    During the 2nd World war some tunnels were built under the town. Since few year ago you couldn't visit them , now they organize visits in some tunnels but you have to write an email or call the CAT,Club Alpinistico Triestino 040-762027
    The first link is in Italian but you can see some picture there.
    I still didn't see kleine berlin but I'm going to and when I will I'll uplaod some picture if you can get picture during the visit.

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    Absburgic harbour

    by gmg61 Updated May 21, 2006

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    At the times of the Austrian empire, Trieste was the main harbour.
    Nowadays one part of the port mantains the old character, wth huge docks, massive grey buildings etc.
    It's not easy to get in and visit it, but it's an interesting walk

    Stockhouse The absburgic harbour Old italian graffiti
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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Sant'Antonio Vecchio

    by Mikebond Updated May 11, 2006

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    The church of Sant'Antonio Vecchio stands in Piazza Hortis. It isn't so large and known as Sant'Antonio Nuovo, nevertheless the inside is not less beautiful. It deserves a visit if you have some time.

    Sant'Antonio Vecchio an altar the ceiling the organ the nave
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    University

    by Mikebond Updated May 11, 2006

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    Here you see the main building of the "Università degli Studi di Trieste". It is a beautiful, white construction located in Piazzale Europa ("Europe Square"), on the hill.
    I took this picture from my flat, so it doesn't show the long flight of steps of the building. Inside, when you enter through the revolving door, you can see a decorated floor.

    University
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