Piazza Unità d'Italia, Trieste

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Piazza Unità d'Italia

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  • Piazza Unità d'Italia
    by alyf1961
  • Piazza Unità d'Italia
    by alyf1961
  • Piazza Unità d'Italia
    by alyf1961
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Huge and beautiful

    by solopes Written Dec 28, 2013
    Pizza Unit�� d'Italia - Trieste
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    This very large square (more than 12000 sq. meters), was built when Trieste was the main harbour of the Austrian-Hungarian empire, and changed name several times, as triste was moving from the empire to Italy, later to the free Trieste and finally back to Italy, when it received the actual name - Unità de Itália square.
    It is surrounded by several palaces, (with a clean image. in contrast with many Italian monuments), with City hall in evidence. A fountain and a statue are the only elements occupying the immense free área.

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    City Hall

    by HORSCHECK Updated Aug 19, 2012

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    City Hall
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    The City Hall (Palazzo del Municipio) is the dominating building on Trieste's main square Piazza dell'Unita d'Italia.

    Like the square, also the City Hall was designed by the Italian architect Giuseppe Bruni. He completed the building in eclectic style in 1875.

    The main feature of the City Hall is the clock tower with its two bronze statues called Michez and Jachez.

    Directions:
    Trieste’s City Hall can be found on the square Piazza dell'Unita d'Italia. The City Hall faces the sea and stands on the southern side of the square.

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  • painterdave's Profile Photo

    Wonderful Building Fronts And More

    by painterdave Written Jul 3, 2012

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    The Municipal Building
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    Before the End of WWI this great piazza was known as the Piazza Grande, but after Trieste was given to the Italians after the war, its title was change to Piazza Unita' d' Italia. However, everything you see built onto the buildings are Austrian in design, and I must admit that I felt like I was in Austria when standing in the Piazza. There is such an interesting story about this area before and after WWI, that I suggest you read about it before coming to Trieste.
    Built at the foot of the hill that has the castle known as San Giusto it faces the sea and the tourist office states that it is the biggest piazza in all Europe that has one side on the sea. in any rate, it is very large and impressive. There are some interesting statues, and if you look at the photos below, you can see a few of them.
    The tourist office is off to one side of the piazza and is difficult to find as there is no sign. However, just walk east of the piazza you will find it along the side of the main building.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Piazza dell'Unita D'Italia, or...

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 18, 2011

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    Piazza d'Unita
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    Piazza dell'Unita D'Italia, or simply Piazza Unita, is the biggest open space in the town of Trieste, and one of the most beautiful squares of that kind in whole Italy.
    It is, no doubt of it, the real heart of the town and the most visited promenade, especially during the weekends. This is the place where Triestini (the citizenzs of the town) come to see and be seen by the other people.

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  • ciaobellamici's Profile Photo

    Enjoy Everything You See

    by ciaobellamici Written Oct 2, 2009

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    Allow yourself to wander and gaze upon the calm. Piazza Unita enjoys a view of the Bay of Trieste. The openess and beauty attracts families and lovers, business men and students.
    I enjoyed it immensely and was drawn there daily.
    Evenings are special - the blue lights inserted in the piazza replace the blue water seen during the day.

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  • olja1234's Profile Photo

    PIAZZA UNITA D'ITALIA

    by olja1234 Updated May 18, 2008

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    Trieste is the city with many neoclassical buildings. It has had a long history with many changes of ownership. A long time lasting influence of Austria is seen in many of palaces.

    See the decoration on one of the palaces in Unita's square.

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    PIAZZA UNITA D'ITALIA

    by olja1234 Updated May 18, 2008

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    Piazza d'Unita is one of the biggest squares in Triest. It is located close to the shore and encircled by imposing palaces.
    On the photo you can see a palace which houses the goverment of the region.

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  • montezaro's Profile Photo

    The Town Hall

    by montezaro Updated Sep 21, 2007

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    The Town Hall
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    The Town Hall and the seat of the Friuli Region Government is situated in the central position of the Piazza Unita d'Italia. It is fine and beautifuly designed palace with the arcades in the ground floor and the town clock on its rooftop.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Fontana dei Quattro Continenti

    by mikey_e Updated Aug 31, 2007

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    Fonatana dei Quattro Continenti

    The Fontana dei Quattro Continenti or Fountain of the Four Continents is one of the main artistic attraction in the Piazza dell'Unità d'Italia that is not actually a building. It was sculpted by the artist Mazzoleni in 1751. Each of the four continents (the Americas are considered as one continent) is represented by a different animal: Europe by the horse, Africa by the lion, Asia by the camel and the Americas by the crocodile. At the time, Australia had yet to be "discovered" by James Cook and thus was not included in the Fountain.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Comunale

    by mikey_e Updated Aug 31, 2007

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    Fa��ade of the Palazzo Comunale from the south
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    The Palazzo Comunale or Municipio dominates the Piazza dell'Unità d'Italia from the east and is the centre of any view of the Piazza from the Riva. It serves as the seat of Municipal government (complementing the Palazzo del Lloyds Triestino and Palazzo del Governo, headquarters for other levels of government) and was constructed in 1872. The most notable components of this unusual façade are the bronze statues of Micheze and Jacheze, which sound the hours in the clock tower, and the statue of Karl IV, the Austro-Hungarian Emperor who declared Trieste a free port (one of the main sources of Trieste's growth as an urban centre).

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Palazzo del Lloyds Triestino

    by mikey_e Written Aug 30, 2007

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    Fa��ade of the Palazzo del Lloyds Triestino

    The Palazzo del Lloyds Triestino dominates the south side of the Piazza dell'Unità d'Italia. It was completed in Renaissance-revival style by the Viennese architect Heinrich Ferstel between 1880 and 1883. I must admit that, for all the beauty and hype of Piazza dell'Unità d'Italia, there appears to be very little about the actual history of the Palazzo del Lloyds Triestino. Nonetheless, it is still imposing and magnificent and truly completes the impression left by the Piazza.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Palazzo del Governo

    by mikey_e Written Aug 30, 2007

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    Palazzo del Governo from afar
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    The Palazzo del Governo was built between 1901 and 1905 and was designed by the Austrian architect Emil Artmann. It currently hosts the seat of the Prefecture of UTG-Trieste and cannot be visited except with express permission (i.e. not by tourists). The upper parts of the façade are most notable for the mosaics in Murano glass with various stories and allegories depicted. There are also some remarkable covered balconies along the upper floors (these are used by dignitaries on official state visits).

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Imposing Grandeur

    by mikey_e Updated Aug 30, 2007

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    The Piazza dell'Unit�� at dusk
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    The Piazza dell'Unità d'Italia is the imposing and impressive centre of a city where many of the buildings exude their grand Hapsburg heritage. The Piazza was created in the 19th century by filling in a Roman harbour. It sometimes doubles as a setting for concerts and the like (obviously free ones put on by the comune) and provides great opportunities for picture taking as it opens out onto the harbour. The sides of the Piazza are flanked by government offices and businesses, while there are several cafés with seating on the Piazza itself. Come here at dusk, as the setting sun on the water, combined with the architecture of the Piazza, is ideal for getting memorable snapshots.

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  • montezaro's Profile Photo

    Piazza Unita' d'Italia

    by montezaro Updated Jul 23, 2007

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    Piazza Unita
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    Piazza Unita' d'Italia, coloquially called Piazza Unita, is the biggest open space in the city of Trieste and one of the biggest square in whole Italy. Here you can see some of the finest palaces of the town and yesteryear type hotel Duchi d'Aosta.
    It is the favorite promenade area of the locals, ecpecially on sunny winter days.

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    Piazza Unita d'Italia

    by mikelisaanna Written Oct 15, 2006

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    The Piazza Unita d'Italia in Trieste

    The Piazza Unita d'Italia is the main square of Trieste and a beautiful example of Austro-Hungarian architecture. The Piazza sits along the waterfront and offers interesting views of the Adriatic. The Piazza's other three sides are lined with buildings from the 1700s and 1800s, including the city hall, with its famous clock tower, and the Duca d'Aosta hotel, which features Harry's Bar. There are a number of outdoor cafes around the Piazza, which make for a great place to take a break and watch the world go by.

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