Civitavecchia Things to Do

  • Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
    Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
    by maykal
  • Teatro, Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
    Teatro, Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
    by maykal
  • Civitavecchia beach
    Civitavecchia beach
    by maykal

Most Recent Things to Do in Civitavecchia

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE MUNICIPAL THEATRE

    by balhannah Updated Sep 5, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Municpal theatre

    The Municipal Theatre was designed by the 'architect Antonio De Rossi was named in honor of the emperor Trajan Trajan Theatre founder of the city.
    I thought this was quite interesting, in that the original shape of this building was a horsehoe, and the curtain was made up of an oil painting depicting a sacrifice to Neptune Emperor Trajan

    It was in 1844, the Theatre opened with the premiere of Donizetti's opera "Eustogia by Romano."
    Unfortunately, it was destroyed in the war, and a new theater was rebuilt and reopened in 1948.
    The theater has a neoclassical facade on the outside, and inside, it has 638 seats.

    Related to:
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHEDRAL

    by balhannah Updated Sep 5, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Cathedral

    Where the Cathedral stands today, once stood a smaller Church. The City and population outgrew this Church, and a new one was built, which was the Cathedral I was viewing today. It was a simple Church until 1805, when the Church of San Francesco became the Cathedral of the Diocese of Civitavecchia.
    If you look up to nearer the top of the Cathedral, you will seed two large statues of S. Francis of Assisi and St. Anthony of Padua. The Bell's are of historic interest too, as they were made with metal with two cannons donated specifically by the Pope.

    The entry to the front door is by many steps.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    FORT MICHELANELGO

    by balhannah Written Sep 5, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fort Michelangelo
    4 more images

    The Fort, you will see from the Cruise Ship, and will be the first major sight when being dropped off by the shuttle bus at the end of the Pier. When standing beside these walls, I realized just how massive they were, and even though I couldn't measure the thickness, I read they are 6 metres thick, wow!

    It was the Pope in the year 1503, who decided a city a fortress was needed to defend the town as well as the port. The fort was completed in 1535 under the pontificate of another great Pope, Pope Paul III Farnese, the great patron of the arts.

    The fort is the shape of a quadrangle, and has four bastions which are named, Saint Columba, Santa Stop, San Sebastian, San Giovanni. In the tower of San Sebastian is an underground corridor, used as a secret exit from the fortress to the ground, and in Santa Stop, once in direct contact with the sea, is a small chapel in honor of the saint, patron of the city.
    The walls have a balustrade with an openings where muskets or cannons were fired. Once, there was a Moat, this no longer exists
    The fort could be completely isolated from the rest of the fortress in order to be able to concentrate the last defense. The old entrance still has the bronze pulley that was used to lower and raise the bridge.

    There is an admission fee

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balramdass's Profile Photo

    Civitavecchia visit

    by balramdass Written Aug 20, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just came back from Civitavecchia from a cruise visit. C is much changed since we were last there about 8 years ago, then we just went to Rome and just spent about an hour in C but this time we didnt go to Rome and stayed in C.

    It is now a more like a asmall seeside town with a lot of shops , market, restaurants and bars.
    You can change money here too at a reasonable rate. The market was good, managed to get a few things with some bartering. Had 2 beers in the open outdoor bar, another paint at the bar by the seaside, a bit expensive though for 5 euros. There is a lovely statue of a sailor and a girl by the seaside.

    Next time I go on another cruise and we stop at C i will be more than happy to spend 3-4 hours here.
    Hope this helped, Bal

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ancient Baths - Terme Taurine

    by MTZsgirl Written Oct 15, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A view of the ruins at Terme Taurine

    Terme Taurine
    Located in Civitavecchia you'll find the Archaeological-Botanical Park of the Taurine Baths. These baths were built around naturally hot sulfur (sulphur) spring water. The site has two parts: The Republican Baths which date back to the 1st century B.C. and The Imperial Baths built by Emperor Hadrian between 123-136 A.D. For approx. 5 euros you can walk around on your own however for only approx. 8 euros you can have a guided tour (English available). The guided tour is much more informative as you will learn about the building techniques, what archaeologists believe each space was used for, and much more. Recently the site has added a formal Roman style garden called Horti Traianei (Gardens of Emperor Trajan), which includes many of the plants that the Romans would have recognized.

    The guided tour takes about 1.5-2 hours and makes for a leisurely afternoon if you are looking for a short trip. The Baths are closed on Mondays. Current hours for the summer are Tues.-Sun. 9:00am-1:00pm and again 2:30pm-dusk. Winter hours are Tues.-Sun. 9:00am-1:00pm and again 3:00pm-dusk.

    For more information visit the website: www.prolococivitavecchia.it, send an email to prolococivitavecchia@inwind.it, or call (from in Italy) 338-2707567.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Trains
    • Cruise

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    The walls and Forte Michelangelo

    by maykal Updated Jan 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Old walls and Fort Michelangelo, Civitavecchia

    You can walk along the top of the walls...not as exciting as it sounds, as it is more like walking along a wide pavement, but you do get good views over the busy harbour and Forte Michelangelo, a 15th century fortress museum at the entrance to the port. Can't tell you more about the fort...if Civitavecchia merits a mention in any tourist guide, it is usually the fort that is mentioned and nothing else, but it was a hot day and I was in no mood for museums. And anyway, it was shut.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Seafront Market

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Seafront Market, Civitavecchia
    1 more image

    I don't know if this is a permanent feature or whether it just appears for a few weeks in summer, but in the park behind the beach clubs along Viale Garibaldi, there was a large market selling second-hand books, tie-died clothing, friendship bracelets and the usual tat. I didn't notice it in the morning, only finding the market with an hour to go before the ship left port...and for a touristy market, there didn't seem to be many tourists there.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    The Beach

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Civitavecchia beach
    2 more images

    Steps from the promenade lead to a sandy beach which stretches beyond the Pirgo. In August, it didn't seem too overcrowded, and unlike many Italian beaches, sunbeds and umbrellas were not set out in rows. For a public beach very close to one of Italy's major ports, the water was remarkably clear and there were swimmers aplenty.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    The church at the end of the seafront

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Civitavecchia

    Nope...no idea what the church is called...and to be honest, it isn't anything rushing out of your way to see. But after missing a train to Tarquinia and having to wait an hour for the next, I'd spotted what looked to be an intriguing building from the top of the station steps...it turned out to be this yellow church, with a statue of ...erm...someone outside.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Il Pirgo

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Il Pirgo, Civitavecchia
    4 more images

    I liked the absurdity of il Pirgo, the ornate pier that leads to a very small and possibly man-made island just off the main beach. It looks better from afar, and there are nice views of the seafront from the end, but up close the pier has been vandalized with black marker pens. I like some graffitti when it shows artistic talent, but scribblings in black marker pen do seem pointless...but somehow here, it seemed appropriate.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    The Seafront

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Civitavecchia seafront
    2 more images

    Instead of turning off left to the station, cross over the busy road and you'll find the pedestrianized seafront promenade. Again, the buildings (including some outdoor cafes with good views) along the promenade do seem to have been restored and given a lick of paint. I'd read some damning reviews of Civitavecchia before going, but walking along here, I had to wonder if those reviewers had actually spent more than a few minutes in the town.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Viale Garibaldi

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    The busy street along the seafront leads to the train station and the beach...so in the morning, throngs of cruise ship passengers walked in one direction, while late afternoon there was mass migration in the opposite direction. Shops and bars along here have obviously tried to capitalize on this passing trade...there's a loud English pub and some tacky souvenir shops, but there are also some grand old hotels and a colourful pink and purple church...oh, and the obligatory statue of Garibaldi.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    The other side of Corso Centocelle

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Civitavecchia
    1 more image

    I'm not sure if this is still part of the centro storico...the buildings are a mixture of new and not-so-new, and some of the streets are narrow...a few piazzas with outdoor cafes and shops. Lots of buildings have been painted disturbing shades of pink, which may be an attraction for some I suppose.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    The main street, Corso Centocelle

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Teatro, Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
    3 more images

    The pedestrian main street of Civitavecchia seems to have had a recent paint job, and has several attractive buildings painted bright colours. The most striking building is probably the theatre. Aside from this, there are plenty of shops, cafes and restaurants, and lots of cruiseship crew members enjoying a few hours off.

    Was this review helpful?

  • maykal's Profile Photo

    The little archway

    by maykal Written Jan 16, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The small archway, Civitavecchia
    1 more image

    It may look like Piazza Leandra is a dead end, but look again. Up the steps at the far end, you'll see a tiny archway almost hidden in the corner. Through the archway, the centro storico continues a bit more, and this side of the archway is more picturesque, housed under a tiny brick tower sandwiched between two old houses.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Civitavecchia

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

107 travelers online now

Comments

Civitavecchia Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Civitavecchia things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Civitavecchia sightseeing.

View all Civitavecchia hotels