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  • Colosseo at night.
    Colosseo at night.
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    Piazza Navona
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  • Parishioners awaiting the beginning of Sunday mass
    Parishioners awaiting the beginning of...
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Most Viewed Favorites in Rome

  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    The Capitoline Hill.

    by Maurizioago Updated Apr 14, 2015

    Favorite thing: In Roman times there were various temples on the Capitoline hill. There was the tabularium (the public Roman archive) and the mint of the Republican age as well.

    Piazza del Campidoglio (Capitol square) is situated on the top of this hill. Michelangelo was commissioned to create this square in 1536, but much of the work on this square was done in the 17th century. Michelangelo designed the new facades for the two buildings; palazzo Senatorio and palazzo dei Conservatori. He designed a new palace; palazzo Nuovo. In the center of the square is a statue of emperor Marcus Aurelius. It is a replica.

    Palazzo Senatorio houses the office of the mayor of Rome. Palazzo dei Conservatori and palazzo Nuovo are used as museums. There are mostly ancient statues there.

    You have to climb a long stairway to go up to piazza del Campidoglio; the Cordonata. This was designed by Michelangelo as well. At its top there are two big statues of Castor and Pollux.

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  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    La Bocca della Verità.

    by Maurizioago Updated Apr 14, 2015

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    Favorite thing: According to a popular belief it was said that somebody putting his hand in this mouth and swearing falsely, could not withdraw it.

    You find this mouth into the atrium of St. Mary in Cosmedin church.

    The closest metro stop to this church is; Circo Massimo; B line.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Leggenda della citta eterna - Legend of the eterna

    by croisbeauty Updated Mar 11, 2015

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    Favorite thing: History of an civilization is studied and determined on the basis of written documents and/or traces that are left behind that civilization. There is no written document which explicitly mentions the time in which Rome was founded, there exist only a legend in which we can believe or not.
    According to speculations, founding of Rome is connected with the legendary city of Alba Longa, whose remains have not yet been found, it is only presumed that so-called city existed in the vicinity of Castel Gandolfo. City of Alba Longa was allegedly founded by the Trojan prince Aeneas, who led the exodus from defeated troy looking for new accommodation of surviving Trojans. All this, however, hangs on a thin stick because not even the year in which Troy was defeated (1184 BC) has not yet been scientifically verified. Nowhere is stated in which year Aeneas become the king of Alba Longa, he was succeeded by his son Ascanius who reigned from 1169 -1141 BC. A long list of 15 kings ends with Numitor (last of Aeneas successor) although some sources mentioning Gaius Cluilius as the last king of Alba Longa.
    A person who connects Alba Longa and Rome was called Rhea Silvia, daughter of King Numitor. Rhea Silvia was a priestess in the temple of the goddess Vesta and as such had to be a virgin. But she remained pregnant after having affair with god Mars and gave birth to twins Romulus and Remus. Here again we encounter the myth according to which the Earth girl pregnant with God. It is hard to believe something like that really could happen.
    According to the myth, the king Amulius (brother of Numitor), who had no direct descendents, ordered that a new-born twins must be thrown into the Tiber River. The river was cleared twins on the bank where she-wolf found them and fed with own milk. "La Lupa Capitolina" (Capitoline Wolf) is an everlasting symbol of the city of Rome, however, about its origins there are many controversies. Many believe that the statue is a masterpiece of Etruscans, same as Chimera, and that is of ancient origin. The results found after checking with radiocarbon, however, have conclusively proved that the statue was created in the 11th or 12th century. Otherwise, she-wolf is a symbol of the god Mars (god of war). So, faith is determined that the twins survive and later set up the city of Rome.

    Fondest memory: According to the myth, Romulus founded the city of Rome on the Capitoline Hill, 21.04.753 BC. When Remus jumped over the fence and tried to enter the city, Romulus killed his own twin brother. Romulus named the city as Rome and began to inhabit it with surroundings shepherds and refugees from Lazio. It is an important historical fact, showing that the original population of the city was composed of primitive and ignorant people. Eventually Latins become the majority population of the city which is why it incorrectly interprets that the city was founded by the Romans.
    Latins were a tribe that inhabited the small region "Latium Vetus" (Old Latium), located south of the river Tiber. They occupied Lazio in the 6th c. BC at a time when Rome was ruled by Etrusci. Latins were totemists and their main totem was she-wolf. Latins were mostly farmers of low civilization level and did not know the letter which they learned from Etruscans. Thus, for example, labels for the numbers, which we know today as the Roman numbers, copies of numerical codes that were used by Etruscans.
    So we came to the Etruscans a mysterious people of unknown origin, that so intriguing the history of the Apennine peninsula. It is not known from where they moved to Italy but according to the latest assumptions, based on DNA analysis, it is possible to derive from Asia Minor. The origins is not the only fact which we don't know about the Etruscans, far bigger problem is that their language and written texts to this day have not been deciphered. Around 1000 BC the Etruscans settled the central area of today's Italy, Tuscany and parts of Umbria and Emilia Romagna, all the way to the Po river. The ancient Greeks called them Tyrrhenoi (sea People), Latins called them Etruschi or Tusci (tower builders), and they called themselves Rasenna.

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  • GracesTrips's Profile Photo

    Reputable Tour Guide Company

    by GracesTrips Updated Mar 4, 2015

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    Favorite thing: As travelers, my boyfriend and I are not too fond of guided tours. We dislike the idea of having to stick with a schedule or being with a group of people. But....in some cases, a guided tour could be a wonderful experience. We opted to use this particular company for an individual guided tour of the Vatican (recommended by close friends). The cost is not cheap but was a tremendous savings from booking an individual guided tour from the Vatican's official website. We had the most amazing experience. Our guide was extremely knowledgeable and spoke English quite well. Our tour was supposed to be about 4 hours but was closer to almost 5 hours. We didn't have to wait in any lines. This was well worth the cost we spent and highly recommend visiting the Vatican with a guide. See more on my Vatican tip!

    SIT Italy
    Link: http://www.sit-italy.com/
    Toll free telephone number: 1.888.813.4450
    email: info@sit-italy.com

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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Churches: the best free museums in Rome!

    by Jefie Updated Jan 14, 2015

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    Favorite thing: Whether you're a budget traveler, an art lover, a history buff, or all the above, you should definitely put Rome's churches at the top on your list of things to see in the Citta Etterna! There are over 900 churches in Rome, most of them Roman Catholic, with the oldest dating back to as early as the 4th century. Several churches were built or restored in the 16th or 17th century, at the height of the Baroque period. In fact, if Florence can be seen as the cradle of the Renaissance, then Rome should definitely be seen as the birthplace of the Baroque. This style was favoured by the Catholic Church who had decided at the Council of Trent that religious art should address all people, not only the educated few. With its slightly over-the-top architecture and its paintings and sculptures overflowing with emotions, the Church believed that Baroque was just the right style to convey the idea of God's infinite greatness to the masses. Artists like Carravagio and Bernini flourished during that period; their works, often commissioned by the pope, can be seen in several churches across the city. While I can't pronounce myself a huge fan of the former's paintings, I thought Bernini's sculptures were beyond superb and the fact that I got to see all these masterpieces for free (there usually are no entry fees to visit churches in Rome), and in such a beautiful setting, was quite simply mindblowing!

    I've already written a tip about the proper attire one should wear when visiting Roman churches, and another thing to keep in mind is that a large portion of the population still goes to church regularly. During the day, services are typically held in side chapels to accommodate tourists; it only makes sense to show respect in return by remaining silent and not taking pictures. Oh, and on Saturdays, chances are pretty good you're gonna walk into a church filled with white flowers in preparation for a wedding :o)

    Angel statue by Bernini at Sant'Andrea delle Fratt Getting ready for a wedding in Rome! Parishioners awaiting the beginning of Sunday mass Pope John Paul II is still very much beloved Another beautiful marble sculpture
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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Piazza Farnese

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 8, 2014

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    Favorite thing: Santa Brigida is a convent church dedicated to St. Bridget of Sweden. The present facade was constructed in1705 and adorned with statues of St.Bridget and her daughter St.Catherine. The neo-Romanesque bell-tower was added in 1894.
    There are two identical decorative fountains located in the Piazza Farnese, placed here in the 16th century. Both fountains are simply called Fontana della Piazza Farnese. It is believed that the granite stone basins come from the ancient Roman Baths of Caracalla. The emblems on the upper part of the fountain are those of the Farnese family and the builder of palazzo cardinal Alessandro Farnese, later Pope Paul III.

    Fondest memory: Palazzo Farnese is named after Alessando Farnese, a member of minor noble family who was appointed cardinal in 1493 at the age of 23 only. Later on in 1534 Cardinal Farnese became Pope Paul III and comissioned Antonio de Sangallo the Younger to enlarge his private small palace which stood on this spot. Sangallo redesigned palace to reflect the change in status of its owner. After Sangallo's death the palace was yet to be completed and Michelangelo was asked by the pope to take over.
    Michelangelo modified Sangallo's project in the design of the first floor windows and in the overall height of the building. The cental window is in particularly beautiful and the coat of arm of the Pope Paul III above it.
    After pope's death his heirs entrusted Il Vignola and later on Giacomo della Porta with the completion of the palace.

    Palazzo Farnese Convento di Santa Brigida Fontana della Piazza Farnese bell-tower of Santa Brigida

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    What else did we see?

    by toonsarah Written Sep 14, 2014

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    Favorite thing: Rome is a large and historic city, and a week here would not be too long. We had, as I have said, only a few hours so we saw only a fraction of what it has to offer. Some famous sights though could be seen from the Hop On, Hop Off bus, and gave us tantalising glimpses of places we had visited and loved on our previous trip here – the Circus Maximus, the Forum, the Tiber, St Peter’s Basilica and more. Other sights though are hidden from the bus’s route, as Rome’s narrow streets make it impossible for large vehicles to get close to these. For these you must get out and walk, something we had no time to do. If this trip has done one thing, it has made us determined to revisit Rome for a somewhat lengthier visit in the not too distant future.

    The Forum Circus Maximus Crossing the Tiber St Peter's St Peter's
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  • brendareed's Profile Photo

    Getting the good shots - photography locations

    by brendareed Written Jun 1, 2014

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    Favorite thing: As I planned my trip to Rome, I was hoping to get some good photos from various vantage points in the city. The weather, although wintertime, cooperated with me and we didn’t experience rainy days, although we did have some clouds so my photos didn’t always have the blue skies and fluffy white clouds in the background that I like so much. But the sun was bright when it was out and that usually worked to my advantage. Timing being everything with the sun, there were some things I purposely planned in order to have the sun at the right angle for my photos. Fortunately, there are so many great places to get photos in Rome, no matter where you are in the city you have opportunities for good photos.

    Some of my favorite places for photos:

    ~ At the top of St. Peter’s Basilica. Okay, it meant climbing up the steps to the top of the dome, but it was worth it! I took my zoom lens with me and thankfully it wasn’t too crowded so I had time to make adjustments as well as take enough photos for panoramic photos. We went around noon so the sun would be high in the sky, allowing me to take photos pretty much all the way around the top of the dome, both of St. Peter’s Square and Rome and its monuments, but also of the Vatican and its gardens.

    ~ Behind the Capitoline Museum. We toured the Roman Forum so I was able to get lots of up close photos of places in the Forum. But for that overall photo, I went up to the Capitoline Museum and walked around to the right side of the museum on Via d. Campidoglio, which led to a terraced overlook near the Temple of Saturn. From that vantage point, I could get photos almost the entire Forum in my photos and a hint of the Colosseum in the background.

    ~ For some photos of the Colosseum from a little higher up, walk up to the Palatine Hill (this is in the part where an admission fee is required) to the northeast corner that overlooks the Colosseum. From here we were able to get a couple photos of each other with the structure behind us, and then I took some of just the Colosseum and the Arch of Constantine in the foreground. Again, I took these mid-day when the sun was overhead so I really didn’t have to deal with the lighting so much.

    ~ For some good photos of the city from the other end, try the overlook near the Villa Medici looking towards St. Peter’s. These are best in the morning with the sun behind you – I was there at sunset and the sun was right over St. Peter’s and I wasn’t really pleased with the effect. Ideally, if I could do it again, I would be at the Villa Medici in the morning and at St. Peter’s in the evening for my sunrise/sunset photos.

    ~ We happened upon the Janiculum Hill setting on our last day and it provides a nice overlook of the city of Rome. It is a little farther away than other sites, but if you have the right equipment and the day is clear, this is a nice location with flat ground and walls that you can set up your tripod. We were there in the morning and my photos didn't turn out well -- later in the day would be better from this location.

    ~ Another location that I came across during my trip to Rome was the top of Castel St. Angelo (nice mid-way between the city and St. Peter’s). This is best in the morning if you want St. Peter’s photos
    and you have to pay the admission fee to get to the top. Also, from here you can get some nice photos of the Tiber and Ponte St. Angelo.

    ~ Although I didn’t go to the top, the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument near the Capitoline Hill is a great location for photos since the monument stands up higher than most buildings in the area. You pay to go up to the top in the glass elevator but it would be a great view for the Forum, Colosseum, and the rest of the city.

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  • brendareed's Profile Photo

    free sites in Rome - Rome on a budget

    by brendareed Written Jun 1, 2014

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    Favorite thing: Rome can be a pricey place to visit, but there are lots of places you can visit and still see some fantastic historical sites and view amazing art by masters, thus saving you money that you can use to splurge on the must-see sites that charge.

    For starters, most every church in town is free to enter. Inside many of these are art treasures that could take you days to view. How about

    ~Michelangelo’s Moses in San Pietro in Vincoli or his famous Pieta in St. Peter’s Basilica; ~Caravaggio’s three paintings of St. Matthew in San Luigi dei Francesi, his Madonna of the Pilgrims in Sant’ Agostino, or his pair of paintings of St. Peter and St. Paul in Santa Maria del Popolo; ~Bernini’s works are all over Rome, starting with St. Peter’s Square and the Four Rivers Fountain in Piazza Navona. Don’t forget his elephant statue in front of Santa Maria sopra Minerva and his St. Teresa in Ecstasy in Santa Maria della Vittoria.

    If you are interested in ancient Roman history and don’t want to spend the money to enter the Roman Forum,

    ~you can stand behind the Capitoline Museum for a wonderful overlook of the Forum on one side and on the other side of the museum you can get a close up of one of the Arch of Septimius Severus;
    ~walk around the Colosseum and get a close up of the Arch of Constantine for free;
    ~visit the Porticus of Octavia and Theatre of Marcellus near the Jewish Ghetto;
    ~Trajan’s Column can easily be seen from the sidewalks beside the Imperial Forum;
    ~walk around the Piazza Argentina and look at the current excavations of four temples and the site of Julius Caesar’s murder.

    Some of the most visited attractions in Rome are free:

    ~the Trevi Fountain
    ~the Pantheon
    ~the Spanish Steps, and the
    ~Vittorio Emanuele II Monument.

    Rome is an expensive city but you don’t need to break the bank to enjoy some of the great treasures the city has to offer.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The Aurelian Walls

    by croisbeauty Updated Mar 19, 2014

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    Favorite thing: In its long history Rome was open city area, welcoming all people of good will. During many centuries the town wasn't surrounded by any walls at all, but then around the third century A.D. Barbarian thretenigs become more evident and the Empire decided to protect the city from invasions. A line of city walls was built between 271 and 275, it is what we know today as The Aurelian Walls. The walls enclosed all seven hills of Rome and the full circuit run for over 19 kilometres......

    Fondest memory: The quality of the pictures isn't very good because I took them from inside of the bus

    Aurelian walls Aurelian walls Aurelian walls Aurelian walls

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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    Right foot, left foot, repeat.

    by goodfish Updated Feb 5, 2014

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    Favorite thing: Over two trips and 10 days in the city, we've rarely taken public - or any other type - of transport and not because it's inconvenient, expensive or complicated. On our feet, we could wander into narrow rustic streets, up ancient back stairways and into lush green spaces that we would have missed had we taken taxi, bus or Metro. On foot, we were often surrounded by more Romans than tourists, and the music that is Italian conversation. Rambling the backstreets you can smell the aromas of roasting meat and simmering sauces from the kitchens of weathered, cantalope-colored flats, hear children at play in postage stamp-sized courtyards, see the riot of flowers that spill from window boxes and tiny terraces, and experience little corners of the Rome that is home to thousands of people.

    Here are a couple areas that have been particular favorites (so far):

    • Trastevere: considered by its population to be "authentic" Rome. Very rustic, very beautiful; take a wander to Santa Maria in Trastevere, see the church and explore at least the 5-6 block area surrounding the piazza.

    • Via Giulia: a roughly 10-block stroll of 16th - 18th-century pallazi, churches and antique shops, it's included in many guidebooks but there were almost no tourists around when we were there

    • Any of the routes right along the Tiber - especially in the evening and early morning

    • Villa Borghese and bits of Parco Colle Oppio

    • Portico d'Ottavia area in the Jewish Ghetto: Roman ruins, medieval and renaissance buildings

    • Aventine Hill

    • Ponte Sant'Angelo

    • Anywhere on the Appia Antica

    Fondest memory: A favorite memory is of walking to the Capitoline very early on our first morning in Rome; the slow-moving Tiber reflecting Bernini's angels on the Ponte Sant'Angelo, passing shuttered shops along quiet, cobbled streets and trading buon giornos with a few locals on their way to work. Too early for the museums to be open, we wandered into a virtually deserted Forum to marvel, in the grey mist of a light rain, at the crumbled, silent remains of what was once the center of the most powerful empire on earth.

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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    hope not sick policlinico

    by gwened Written Aug 24, 2013

    Favorite thing: hope not sick while visiting Rome but the hospital of architectural proportions and nice area call policlinico is very nice to look at.

    We walk all around it and figure the architecture of the different unit department services was worth capturing in photo.

    Its close to termini so you are well covered if need it. We didn't thankfully the pictures from outside are better than going inside ::)

    a bit of history
    the first stone was put up in January 19 1888 with the presence of king Umberto I and queen Margherita; and by August 1904 the policlinico started functioning as such.

    http://www.policlinicoumberto1.it/

    Fondest memory: walking its streets and seeing history and architecture wonders before our eyes

    main entrance Policlinico the side exit gate at policlinico the bus stop  outside but walk close to termini
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  • ptippen's Profile Photo

    Before you go

    by ptippen Written Aug 30, 2012

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    Favorite thing: I would like to offer just one piece of advice. Spend as much time as possible to prepare before you go. Decide on the places you want to visit then read and read. This time will be well worth it as you look at "one more piece of rock or on more sculpture" and see not this but the purpose and history of each piece and the difference in every stop you make. It will come to life for you and open itself up for you.

    Fondest memory: I miss the surprise around each corner.

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  • monorailgold's Profile Photo

    My camera was stolen!!!!

    by monorailgold Updated Jul 2, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Unfortunatly, I have heard numerous stories about people who have had their cameras stolen. Not only were they upset because of the loss of their camera, but also about all the pictures that were on the memory cards as well. Some people said they had 1300 photos on their 2 gig cards and now they are all gone because their camera was stolen. My suggestion is to invest in more of the smaller cards. You can buy 3 or 4 2gig cards for the price of one 10 gig card. You can carry these in your pocket and change when the card is full. This way you protect the pics you have already taken. I use 2 gig cards most of the time. I can get about 500 pics on them at 9.0 megapixels. If your camera has less megapixels you can fit more, if it has more you will fit less. I also download all of my pictures every night to my laptop or ipod. This way, if my camera is lost or stolen, I have only lost 1 days worth of photos and not an entire trips worth. I do have a 10 gig card and will certainly use it on my next trip, but I will still download it at night. Protect those photos!!!!

    forum
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Tiber

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jul 1, 2012

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    Favorite thing: The Tiber is the third-longest river in Italy which has achieved lasting fame as the main watercourse of the city of Rome, founded on its eastern banks.
    According to legend, the city of Rome was founded in 753 BC on the banks of the Tiber about 25 kilometres from the sea at Ostia. The island Isola Tiberina in the centre of Rome, between Trastevere and the ancient center, was the site of an important ancient ford and was later bridged. Legend says Rome's founders, the twin brothers Romulus and Remus, were abandoned on its waters, where they were rescued by a she-wolf.

    In addition to numerous modern bridges over the Tiber in Rome, there remain several ancient bridges (now mostly pedestrian-only) that have survived in part (e.g., the Milvian Bridge and the Ponte Sant'Angelo) or in whole (Fabricius' Bridge).

    Tiber Tiber Tiber
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