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  • Colosseo at night.
    Colosseo at night.
    by breughel
  • Piazza Navona
    Piazza Navona
    by Fam.Rauca
  • Parishioners awaiting the beginning of Sunday mass
    Parishioners awaiting the beginning of...
    by Jefie

Most Viewed Favorites in Rome

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Rome's attractions

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 30, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Rome is among the most attractive European cities. That’s why I choose a trip to Italy in 1996 as my third trip to Europe after trips to France, Germany and Nederland.
    Its history spans two and a half thousand years. It was the capital city of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire. Since the 1st century CE Rome has been the seat of the Papacy and, after the end of Byzantine domination, in the 8th century it became the capital of the Papal States, which lasted until 1870.
    In 1871 Rome became the capital of the Kingdom of Italy, and in 1946 that of the Italian Republic.
    After the Middle Ages, Rome was ruled by popes such as Alexander VI and Leo X, who transformed the city into one of the major centers of the Italian Renaissance, along with Florence.

    There is a tourist office in the train station that can help you find a hotel and gives out maps and information. Most staff at tourist offices speak English. The main office is on Via Parigi near the Piazza della Republica.

    You can watch my 4 min 40 sec Video Rome walking around the city out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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  • Tour Company in Rome

    by egakis Written May 27, 2012

    Favorite thing: When I was in Italy I used a tour company called Excursion Boutique http://www.excursionboutique.com/

    They helped me immensely from the moment I contacted them with everything I should see and do while in Italy and even provided great restaurant recommendations!

    I did the Best of Rome and the Best of Florence private tours with them and I loved it! They are both full-day tours and you visit all the must-see sights. The guide was friendly and very knowledgeable and informative. The best part was by-passing all the long line ups because they pre-purchased all the tickets.

    They also have other tours (group and private) that range in hours but I wanted to make the most of the time I was in each city.

    I also used them for a private transfer from the airport to my hotel in Rome and the driver was on time and very professional.

    They truly made my Italian vacation unforgettable and I am so thankful that my friend told me about them.

    Fondest memory: The food! Simply amazing!

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    LISZT IN ROME

    by breughel Updated Apr 23, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Franz Liszt lived in Rome from 1867 to 1877 and composed here some wonderful pieces for the piano bundled in the third volume of the "Années de Pélérinage".
    The first piece "Angelus!" subtitled "Prayer to the Guardian Angels" evokes the Angelus bells which Liszt heard ringing in the evening at Rome.

    The next three pieces also written in 1877 are famous in the world of classical music: "Aux Cyprès de la Villa d'Este, N°1" and "Aux Cyprès de la Villa d'Este, N°2". It is said that this one was originally inspired by the cypresses of the church of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome at the Terme di Diocletiano (re. my tips on this church). It is thought that these cypresses were planted by Michelangelo.

    The third piece for piano "Les jeux d'eaux à la Villa d'Este" "the Fountains of the Villa d'Esta" where he staid, is even more famous. These works foreshadow the impressionism of pieces on similar subjects by Debussy and Ravel.

    Liszt wrote about this work: "j'ai essayé de rendre en musique quelques unes de mes sensation les plus fortes, de mes plus vives perceptions…" (I tried to translate into music some of my strongest feelings, of my sharpest perceptions…).

    Liszt met the pope Pie IX and played for him at the cloister of Santa Maria del Rosario, on the Monte Mario. Franz Liszt studied theology, was lodged at the Vatican and received the religious "minor orders" in 1865.

    Franz Liszt in Rome - 1860
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    • Music

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    The essential of things to see in Rome.

    by breughel Updated Apr 22, 2012

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    Favorite thing: The best of Rome.

    To a tourist on a first visit to Rome I would without hesitation recommend following visits:

    Antiques: Coliseum, Arch of Constantine, Forum Romano, Palatine hill, Trajan forum (in the same area), Terme di Caracalla, Pantheon.

    Churches: St Peters, Santa Maria Maggiore, St John Lateran, Chiesa del Gesu, San Paolo Fuori le Mure (the last one outside the centre).

    Museums of Antiques: Capitoline Museums on the Piazza del Campidoglio (an absolute must), Museo Nazionale Romano Palazzo Massimo & Museo Nazionale Romano Palazzo Altemps, Vatican museum (if he is prepared to spend time on queuing).

    Medieval and Baroque Rome: Castel Sant' Angelo, Piazza Navona, Trevi fountain, Piazza di Spagna, Piazza del Popolo.

    This program covering the essential of Rome takes 4 - 5 days.

    Faun eying tourists. Colosseo at night.
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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    The Roman "Lupa"- La Louve Romaine.

    by breughel Updated Feb 4, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Any good tourist will have learned that the foundation of Rome goes back to Romulus and Remus (precisely in 753 (!) according to Marcus Varron called "the most learned of the Romans") and that they were children of the princess Rhea Sylvia and the god Mars himself. The princess Rhea was the daughter of the king Numitor of Alba.
    Just like Moses the two babies were put in a basket and entrusted to the floods to escape death. The guides will of course have told you their rescue by a she-wolf, the famous Lupa which became the symbol of Rome.

    But did they tell you that in Latin the word Lupa has two significances: she-wolf and prostitute!
    Now who saved our two cherubim's, a she-wolf or a prostitute?

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Piazza del Campidoglio

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 3, 2011

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    Favorite thing: Piazza del Campidoglio is reached by the great flight of steps known as the Cordonata, built in according to Michelangelo's designs for the triumphal entry of the Emperor Charles V in 1536. At the top of the stairs are two colossal Dioscuri, from Imperial period which were found near the Jewish Ghetto.
    Piazza del Campidoglio was designed by Michelangelo for the magificent Pope Paul III. Michelangelo designed a new piedestal for the equestrian statue of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the only surviving example of the many bronze equestrian statues which once adorned Rome. The statue was hidden in the house of Verus, a descendent of Marcus Aurelius. The original is now kept in the Capitoline Museum, from 1997 a copy stands on the square.

    Piazza del Campigoglio Cordonata Fontana della Dea Roma

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Rioni of Rome

    by croisbeauty Written Dec 1, 2011

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    Favorite thing: The city of Rome is divided into 22 "rioni" and each of it has its own coat of arms. Rione originates from the Latin word REGIO, meaning for region, and is term to name the district of Rome according to the administrative divisions established in the Middle Ages but used even today.
    The first division into the city regions started in times of Servius Tullius, sixth King of Rome. After the Republic collapsed the first Emperor Augustus created the 14 regions of Rome.
    In case this borrowed picture is too small to be read, this are the rioni of Rome: Monti, Trevi, Colonna, Campo Marzio, Ponte, Parione, Regola, Sant'Eustachio, Pigna, Campitelli, Sant'Angello, Ripa, Trastevere, Borgo, Esquilino, Ludovisi, Sallustiano, Castro Pretorio, Celio, Testaccio, San Saba, Prati.

    Rioni of Rome Seven hills of Rome

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    EUR

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 1, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: EUR is both residental and business district in Rome located in the southern part of the city, it is first what one can see of Rome if arriving by the road or from the airport. Actually, EUR was idea of Benito Mussolini in order to expand the city towards south-west and sea.
    The construction of the complex started in 1930 and was planned to be the home to a World Fair. It was planned to be open in 1940 to celebrate 20 years of Fascism.
    The idea of Mussolini was to built the city in classical forms of ancient Roman architecture, I guess world is lucky that it never occured.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Piazza Colonna

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    Favorite thing: Piazza Colonna is situated in the historic heart of Rome. It is named after the marble Column of Marcus Aurelius which stood here since 193 C.E. One of the Popes, who doesn't deserve to be named, ordered bronze statue of Saint Paul to crowns the column.
    The fountain is designed by Giacomo della Porta in 1577 and was restored in 1830 when two sets of dolphins were added.

    Fondest memory: Galeria Colonna is Art Nouveau construction from the beginning of the 20th century. It is shopping arcade with some very nice shops. Since 2003 the gallery is named Galeria Alberto Sordi, after great Italian actor, one of my favourite.
    Palazzo Chigi is the official residence of Prime Minister of Italy. It was built in the 16th century to be a residence for some noble families and the last owner was Chigi family. In 1878 it become the residence of the Austro-Ungarian Ambassador in Italy. In 1916 the palace was bought by the Italian state.

    Galleria Colonna Galleria Colonna Fontana di Colonna e Palazzo Chigi Colonna Antonina Piazza Colonna

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Do you have Roman ancestors?

    by breughel Written Oct 24, 2011

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    Favorite thing: At its maximum extent, under Emperor Trajan in 117 AD, the Roman Empire counted 60 - 80 millions Roman citizens and as many as 100 - 120 millions people lived within its borders extending from England to Egypt, from Portugal to Syria over 5 millions Km2.
    Roman citizens counted for 1/5th of the world's population at the time of the Roman Empire.
    The probability that you have Roman ancestors is therefore higher than you might think when you booked your trip to Rome.

    As soon as you will walk on the Foro Romano you will feel a very special sensation telling you that your roots are on the Via Sacra.

    For those whose ancestors did not like mine fight against the Roman legions, to be killed or enslaved and finally obtain the Roman citizenship, there is the fact that your way of thinking was very probably inspired by the Greek-Roman civilisation.

    Yes you have Roman ancestors.

    Arco di Settimio Severo. Colosseo at night
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  • Laura_Mexico's Profile Photo

    The bridges of Rome

    by Laura_Mexico Updated Oct 18, 2011

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    Favorite thing: These are a couple of nice views of the bridges of Rome over the Tevere river -- picture no. 1 was taken from the top of the Castel St. Angelo, but you can have this wonderful view anytime you stroll along the river, which I highly recommend you to do!!

    The 2nd one was taken in 2011 but I guess I have taken a picture of this same view on each one of my trips hehehehe...... I just like it too much. St. Peter's church at the end of Via della Conciliazione and the bridge with angel sculptures that leads to the Castel St. Angelo, the people strolling along the river side..... it's just something I enjoy very much of Rome!

    Fondest memory: I was with my friend Kalle close to the Castel St. Angelo (back in 2000) when I showed him this view and he liked it very much and was impressed with the beauty of it... Indeed, he wrote & recorded a song called 'Bridges of Rome' (which is lovely, too!) and this picture inspired him quite a bit...

    The bridges over the Tevere river The river, St. Peter
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture

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  • joiwatani's Profile Photo

    What to do in Rome with a family

    by joiwatani Written Oct 14, 2011

    Favorite thing: These are the things that I will visit in Rome if I were a first time visitor with a very limited days:
    1. Visit the Colosseum and see how massive it is and while you are there, visit their store. Go there early in the morning when there are no crowds yet so you can take great pictures. You will also see the daily life of the Romans jogging and going to work in the morning. See the vendors setting up their stores early...
    2. Visit the Trevi Fountain and walk around the plaza and check the local shops and mercatos.
    3. See the Spanish Steps
    4. See the St. Peter's Basilica and pray and appreciate your blessings even if you are not a Catholic. See the Pieta there and look at how beautiful the church is.
    5. Walk around the streets of Rome and when you are tired, eat a Gelato ice cream and taste a Panceretto, local delicacy at Bar Campidolio.
    6. The Roman Forum: Show your family the Temple of Antonino and Faustina, a church that was built inside a building; see the remnants of the House of the Vestal of Virgins; the ruins of the Senatus Populus romans, etc. Look for the place where the Romans played chess in the old days (I found them since our tour guide showed them to us).

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Everything in my pocket

    by MariaLaura0012 Written Jul 20, 2011

    Favorite thing: The whole city is really awesome. Don't forget tasting the real italian pizza (look for the authentic places). There are hours when the lines aren`t so long to see the main monuments. I bought a guide called Tutta Roma that gave me a lot of good tips. This is the link in case you are interested. I truly recommend it. http://www.tuttaromaguide.com/

    Fondest memory: Meeting italian people, sharing a beer and eating pizza. People there is really friendly if you try to speak a little italiano.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Cultural matters on VT and on ...

    by breughel Written Jul 19, 2011

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    Favorite thing: Sometimes I'm frustrated that there is more interest on VT for logistical questions than for cultural and historical matters. But I admit that arriving at the right monument at the right time is not without interest so that I admire the VT members who are permanently and repeatedly advising travelers what train or bus to take to get there where my review about art and history starts.

    Nevertheless VirtualTourist remains miles-kilometers in advance of Tripadvisor as what concerns cultural matters.

    Do you know what is the N° 1 of Traveler recommended attractions for Rome on Tripadvisor?
    Colosseum? no.
    Forum? no.
    Trevi Fountain? no.
    Vatican Museum? no

    I tell you - are you seated - it is "Cooking Classes in Rome" and refers to the commercial activity of a restaurant located in Trastevere.

    Shame.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

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  • JVKRI's Profile Photo

    A Private Tour of Rome with Rudy

    by JVKRI Updated Jun 28, 2011

    Favorite thing: This was our first visit to Italy and we had limited time in Rome. We wanted to maximize what we were able to see without exhausting ourselves. We were already in Italy when we started looking for a private tour, Rudy was one of the few who had a phone number to call (rather than filling out an on-line form and waiting for a reply) which allowed us to make arrangements quickly. He met us at the train station and we started one of our best days in Italy. Rudy spoke excellent English and was very knowledgeable about the history of all the sights. There were six of us and we were escorted in perfect comfort in a minivan,. At each stop we were able to get out, do some exploring, take pictures, etc. Yet we weren't exhausted at the end of the day from walking from place to place. Rudy kept us entertained while he taught us so much about the city. We couldn't have had a better day. Highly recommended! Fantastico!

    Related to:
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