Unique Places in Rome

  • what remains from Hadrian's Temple with the new
    what remains from Hadrian's Temple with...
    by Arizona_Girl
  • front facing porta pia to via nomentana
    front facing porta pia to via nomentana
    by gwened
  • old planetarium
    old planetarium
    by gwened

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Rome

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    Just off the Colassium.

    by Pod Written Sep 18, 2013

    There was a man...he took photos... he took photos of places other photographers could not take photos. ....you have found that man. .... that man who takes photos of photos that other photographers take photos of..

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    Villa Paganini

    by gwened Written Sep 4, 2013

    across from torlonia another wonderful oasis of calm and architecture beauty in the Nomentano district.

    Villa Paganini's origins are linked to Cardinal Mariano Pierbenedetti from Camerino, who bought the vineyard in 1585 to turn it into a prestigious residence. In 1722 the estate was purchased by Cardinal Giulio Alberoni which undertook important work of buildings and the garden. The villa then passed into the hands of several other owners, until in 1890 the property was purchased by Senator Paganini. The wide surrounding the Casino Nobile was cultivated with vines and reeds, and the Park was divided and split into numerous cottages.
    In 1934 the city of Rome acquired the complex allocated for public use and the noble Casino . The Villa was opened to the public on 21 April 1934 in the presence of Benito Mussolini. In 1938, on the side of via Nomentana was placed the monumento ai caduti in World War I by Arnaldo Zocchi (1862-1940). In the years ' 50, in a portion of the Park, were built a series of prefabricated housing and local service schools.

    It has a nice pond with a wooden bridge over it and grottos with fountains now covered. nice family place.

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    Museo historico Bersaglieri

    by gwened Written Sep 3, 2013

    A nice architecture building and a wonderful military museum with great history. This is what I am after.

    The museum is unique because it gives credit to a corp still in active duty. The Bersaglieri (Marksmen in English) are a corps of the Italian Army originally created by General Alessandro La Marmora on 18 June 1836 to serve in the Piedmontese Army, later to become the Royal Italian Army.

    The idea of creating the museum came from army inspector and Bersaglieri Edoardo Testafochi in 1895. the idea continue until finally ,the Museo Storico dei Bersaglieri opened by king Vittorio Emanuele III on June 18 1904, near the army post of "La Marmora" in Trastevere. On December 27 , 1921, it is transfered to the present location by the Porta Pia ,at via XX Settembre.

    You can visit as individuals on Mondays, Wednesdays,and Fridays from 9h to 13h30.

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    The bridges of Rome

    by gwened Written Aug 27, 2013

    Walking on bridges is always full of history and great views, often going from one totally different side of the town to the next with great differences in architecture and history. Love ponte palatino!

    Rome is one of these cities that has districts well aligned full of history and architecture. A joy to walk and we really did try a few, see them and enjoy Roma

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    See Rome from above and beyond

    by gwened Written Aug 27, 2013

    Walking is great for us and on any historical city like Rome it was a treat. However, walking in hilly streets and climbing and seeing the views from above down on Rome is awesome.

    All the best views are from the aventino area around the chevaliers de malta and churchs of St Sabina and St Alessio, as well as climbing the church of trinita dei monte up villa borghese. just wonderful up and down steeep streets and gorgeous views
    enjoy Roma

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    Planetario delle Terme di Diocleziano

    by gwened Written Aug 24, 2013

    Its always nice to see the stars when in Rome, the planetarium will do. Planetario di Roma that is.
    This is the old planetarium so you make believe amongst old buildings, what this central location was doing(the new one was done modern and away from city center)

    the old one is at v. iuseppe-Romita 8 I - 00185 Roma
    A magnificent octagonal hall (hence the name Planetarium) where brick, in an unreal light exposes some masterpieces of classical statuary: the Boxer and the Hellenistic Prince, are two rare examples of surviving intact bronzes. The Aphrodite of Cyrene, a mamo reminiscent of ivory, is magnificent. And the place is just magical.

    You should come by it the area is nice too and buses past by it such as 62

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    Forum Boarium

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jun 23, 2013

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    This area used to be the cattle market in ancient times. It is located near the Mouth of Truth and has two well preserved temples: the circular temple of Hercules Victor and the rectangular Temple of Portunus. Both are well-preserved as they were converted from temples to churches.

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    The Non-Catholic Cemetery. Poets' Graves.

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jun 23, 2013

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    Rome was very crowded during our visit and one of the quietest, most peaceful and most interesting places we visited was the non-catholic cemetery. You can get there by taking the metro B-line to pyramid station. The cemetery contains the graves of several famous people. Two of the most famous are Keats and Shelley.

    Keats went to Rome when he found out he had TB. One of his brothers had died of this disease and Keats probably contracted it while caring for him. In Rome Keats lived with an artist friend next to the Spanish Steps during his illness, but he could not fight it and died. He requested that the words 'Here lies one whose name was writ on water.' on his tombstone. His friends obliged but added more words to show the anger they felt at the attacks Keats had been subjected to by several critics. The friend who nursed Keats is buried next to him.

    Shelley died in a boating accident in which he drowned. His ashes were buried in the non-catholic cemetery. He had apparently visited it before his death and stated what a wonderful, peaceful place it was. The inscription on his tomb comes from Shakespeare.

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    Janiculum Hill, Rome’s Balcony

    by von.otter Updated Mar 19, 2013

    “You, too, women, cast away all the cowards from your embraces; they will give you only cowards for children, and you who are the daughters of the land of beauty must bear children who are noble and brave.”
    — Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882)

    Known as Rome’s balcony, the Janiculum, the second highest hill in modern-day Rome and separate from the famed Seven Hills of Ancient Rome, was the center for the Janus, god of beginnings and endings. Because of its stunning location overlooking the city, the priests of the worship of Janus would stand atop the hill and look for signs from the gods.

    The Aurelian Wall was built up to the Janiculum Hill, to include inside the city walls the water mills, used to grind wheat for making bread, located there. The ancient water mills were in use until the end of ninth century AD.

    Centuries later, Janiculum Hill was the site of a memorable battle. In 1849, Giuseppe Garibaldi fought French troops, who were attempting to reclaim Rome for the pope following Garibaldi’s capture of the city in his effort to unify Italy. Although the French outnumbered Garibaldi’s troops, they were able to resist the French for several weeks; but ultimately were defeated. To commemorate this battle, several monuments were built on Janiculum to pay homage to Garibaldi and his comrades.

    Come for the views. Stay for the sights, including, an authentic puppet theater for kids; the Garibaldi Monuments, one to Giuseppe another to his wife Anita; the Independence War Memorial; San Pietro in Montorio and Tempietto; and Fontana dell’Acqua Paola

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    Foot of Marble

    by TexasDave Written Mar 8, 2013

    The one remaining fragment of a massive statue, the Pie de Marmo is a sandaled foot on a plinth of impressive size. Not much is known about its origin, some think it was originally a large statue in a temple.

    Appropriately is is on Via di pie de Marmo, it is a block and a half West from the back of the Pantheon.

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    Porte di Roma

    by von.otter Updated Feb 25, 2013

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    “When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.”
    —Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922)

    The doors of Rome are many and varied. Most are closed for privacy.

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    Not really a tourist sight

    by GentleSpirit Written Jan 29, 2013

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    I was strolling around by the Tiber and what to my wondering eyes should appear- the National Headquarters of the Italian Communist Party. As I remember it was a pretty nice neighborhood and had some rather expensive looking cafes and restaurants nearby. Gotta love it!

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    Campo dei Fiori

    by von.otter Written Jan 20, 2013

    “A Bruno - Il Secolo Da Lui Divinato - Qui Dove Il Rogo Arse” (English translation: “To Bruno - the century predicted by him - here where the fire burned”)
    —the inscription on the base of the monument to Giordano Bruno

    At the center of Campo dei Firoi stands a monument to the philosopher Giordano Bruno (1548-1600) was burnt alive for heresy in the square 17.February.1600.

    Ettore Ferrari (1848-1929) is the sculptor who created the monument; and it was positioned on the exact spot of his death in 1889. Bruno stands facing in the direction of the Vatican, which opposed the tribute to the scientist. Bruno is celebrated as a martyr to freedom of thought. Bruno’s execution was the only one to take place in Campo dei Fiori; it was commonly used for such purposes.

    The Field of Flowers (Campo dei Fiori) has been used as marketplace for centuries. Each day flowers and fresh vegetables are still sold from tented stands set up in the square.

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    The River Tiber

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 5, 2013

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    We walked along the River Tiber making a brief visit to Tiber Island with its lovely church then walking down the river towards St Peter's. I thought it was a lovely walk, passing lots of bridges, pleasant river scenes and although there were other people it was mercifully uncrowded. Bliss. I would strongly recommend it as a way to restore your sanity when in Rome.

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    The pyramid of Caius Cestius.

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 5, 2013

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    This pyramid located next to the non-catholic cemetery was created for a magistrate Caius Cestius who died in 12BC. At the time all things Egyptian were fashionable. This pyramid was built in just 330 day. It is more than 36 meters high and 29.5 meters wide.

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