Unique Places in Rome

  • what remains from Hadrian's Temple with the new
    what remains from Hadrian's Temple with...
    by Arizona_Girl
  • front facing porta pia to via nomentana
    front facing porta pia to via nomentana
    by gwened
  • old planetarium
    old planetarium
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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Rome

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    The non-catholic cemetery - statues of people.

    by IreneMcKay Written Jan 4, 2013

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    One of the things I liked most about the non-catholic cemetery in Rome was the little figures of people that appeared on or next to graves. Some depicted the deceased person; others I think depicted mourners at their passing.

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    The non-catholic cemetery - angels.

    by IreneMcKay Written Jan 4, 2013

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    There are several angel statues in the non-catholic cemetery of Rome. The loveliest was created by an American sculptor William Storey on the death of his wife, Emelyn. His work the angel of grief and despair is an extremely moving sculpture. If you could take intense grief and turn it into a concrete image this is what you would create. This sculpture almost moved me to tears.

    I found a second angel of grief, a huge angel and many small angel statues, too.

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    EUR

    by leics Updated Nov 23, 2012

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    Someone suggested we visited EUR to see a different side of Rome, so we did.

    EUR stands for 'Esposizione Univerale Roma', and was built on the orders of Mussolini for the 1942 Trade Fair (which did not take place, for obvious reasons). It's laid out on a grid of streets with huge, 'blocky' buldildings.

    There are some good museums here, apparently: the 'Museum of Art and Popular Tradition', the 'National Museum of Prehistory and Ethnography' and so on.

    But its modern monoliths did not really appeal on a grey, damp, chilly late afternoon so we didn't linger long. On a warm, sunny day its wide streets might have more resonance.

    It's certainly worth a visit if you are interested in 20th century architecture (particularly facist-style), and I think I may well seek out one or two of its museums when I next return to Rome.
    But EUR is not somewhere I'd advise you to bother with unless you have explored the myriad of other more interesting off-the-beaten-track parts of Rome.

    Bus 714 from Termini, or Metro line B to one of the three EUR stations.

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    The Jewish quarter

    by leics Updated Nov 23, 2012

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    A short pedestrianised street, Via Portico d'Ottavia, is now the heart of what was once Rome's Jewish ghetto. It's a fascinating and atmospheric area, a maze of narrow streets and alleyways with many Roman artefacts incorporated into its old buidlings.

    There were Jews in Rome from at least the second century BC, and probably before that, but it was Pope Paul Vl whose laws (in the mid-sixteenth century) made them live in this area, effectively creating a ghetto. They had to wear yellow shawls and caps when they left the district.

    Most of Rome's Jews survived the Nazi occupation, and now live all over the city. But along the Via Porto d'Ottavia you can still find kosher restaurants, butchers, bakeries etc (even a kosher fast food outlet), .

    Worth wandering through, if only for the fascinating chunks of Roman masonry dotted around (see photos).

    Walk from Via Del Teatro di Marcello, or from Via Arenula.

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    Leaving the crowds behind

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Sep 11, 2012

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    You wouldn't think so now, as you walk along the quiet streets , past the high walls and iron gates of the gracious mansions and elegant apartment blocks that are a feature of living on Rome's Aventine Hill today, but in Roman times this was not a good address at all. In fact, it was decidedly lower class, one place the plebians were allowed to own property. Lower class it might have been but, as an old saying goes, "where there's muck, there's brass" and plebs though they might have been to their patrician neighbors one hill over on the Palantine, the area was prosperous and not without its own fine buildings - the city's first public library stood here along with temples to Diana, Luna and Juno among others.

    If you're looking for obvious Roman remains, you need to stay at the bottom of the hill, on the north side, we'll go there later. This tip will take you on a walk up the hill on the south side. First you need to cross the grassy sward that is the Circus Maximus - a vast empty space at present though if some local entrepreneurs have their way, that could soon change.

    A gate near the statue of Giuseppe Mazzini (a major figure in the quest for Italian unity) takes you in to the Municipal Rose Garden, growing now on the site of the city's old Jewish cemetery where a network of paths laid out in the shape of a menorah is a tribute to the old inhabitants. It's only a short walk from the upper exit of the rose garden to the Parco Savello, a pretty, formal garden planted with the orange trees that give the park its other name - Giardini degli Aranci. A belvedere on the far side of the park has some of the very best views of the city to be found, so a short detour is definitely in order here before continuing up the hill to the Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta.

    It's just a small square, nothing much of interest here you might think, the Knight's priory isn't open to the public , there's just a high stone wall broken by a solid green door. Put your eye to the keyhole of that door however and the priory's delightful secret is revealed - like a perfectly realized miniature, the dome of St Peter's is framed by an arch of greenery. Although we could see the dome quite clearly, it was a hazy day and capturing it in a photo proved elusive. Maybe that's as well, seeing it for yourself's much better than secondhand through someone else's photos.

    (An interesting aside - like the Vatican, the headquarters of the Cavilieri di Malta, the Knight's Hospitaller of St John, is actually a sovereign state within Rome)

    With the afternoon wearing on, we grabbed a taxi at this point and headed back into the centre. Walking down the other side of the hill would have brought us the the Forum Borea abetween the Aventine and the Capitoline Hills, but that was for another day.

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    Old mixed with new

    by leics Updated Jul 25, 2012

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    One of the most wonderful things about the eminently-walkable city of Rome is seeing how, over the centuries, stones and slabs and statues and marbles from the ancient city have been scavenged and re-used.

    Much of the wonderful, wonderful interior marble of Santa Maria Maggiore was 'reclaimed' from Roman buildings: go to visit and it will give you an idea of just how wealthy and impressive ancient Rome was (in parts, of course: there were plenty of cramped and overcrowded tenement' buildings for the less wealthy).

    Keep your eyes open as you wander: the evidence is everywhere, mostl especially in the backstreets around the central Forum area (for obvious reasons). Columns re-used in buildings, architraves used for door lintels, carved stones incorporated into walls, statues in private courtyards........

    I even saw chunks of black-and-white mosaic flooring used in the huge retaining wall by S.Giovanni e Paulo.

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    Take in Trastevere

    by Bushman23 Written Jul 5, 2012

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    On the opposite side of the river, South of the Vatican, is the district of Trastevere - Not quite so polluted by tourists as to be English speaking, this is apparently where the real Roman's still live and hang out. We went here for dinner one night, and my wife spent a fair while wandering the streets and alleys here too - there are any amount of magnificent, old churches just waiting to be discovered, hills to be climbed, and restaurants to be sampled - the food is also top notch, though the language barrier here can sometimes be a reality!

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    The real Rome????

    by tango_jd Updated Jul 2, 2012

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    Travastere district South of the Vatican on the same side of the river.
    Very quaint, slightly shabby/seedy but with a style and panache.
    Not too bad on prices for meals or drinks and a bit less frantic than the Fountain/Steps areas of the main drag.
    The bridge in the photo - on the Travastere side there was the most wonderful ice-cream shop!

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    Rome in Moscow

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 30, 2012

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    I (and you) may refresh our memory about Rome even without leaving Moscow. We should go to the Main Building of the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts and see
    Capitoline She-Wolf (galvanic cast),
    Giovanni Paolo Pannini “Interior of San Paolo Fuori le Mura in Roma”, “Interior of San Giovanni in Laterano in Rome”, “Pope Benedict XIV visiting the Trevi Fountain” etc…

    Every time I visited this museum since my childhood I admired by these masterpieces… Never knew that I would be able to watch them in Rome…

    12 Volkhonka St., Moscow
    (tel.: +7 495 609-95-20, +7 495 697-95-78, +7 495 697-74-12),
    Metro station: "Kropotkinskaya".
    Ticket price for foreign visitors 400 rubles (10 euro) for adults,
    200 rubles for schoolchildren, students and pensioners.
    Attention! Ticket prices for exhibitions might differ from those for permanent collections.
    Visitors are offered audio guides in Russian, English, German, French and Italian.
    Many exciting tours are on offer!

    Open daily from 10 am to 7 pm
    Thursdays from 10 am to 9 pm
    Closed Monday

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    • Museum Visits

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    Totally unexpected

    by croisbeauty Written Nov 28, 2011

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    It was totally unexpected encounter, I guess it is more likely to meet space-shuttle in Rome, rather then such a car. I was at Ponte Garibaldi when this car came from the direction of Trastevere and couldn't believe what am seeing. It is ancient DAF, if am not wrong, at times the most commonly car which could have been seen on the roads in Eastern Europe, before 1990 changes. Young girl was driving it and she smile at me when I stood in front of the car to take the photo. But that Rome I guess and everything is possible here.

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    The Pope is adressing to people

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    It was December 31st in the morning and the square St. Peter was occupied by the huge crowd who came to Rome from all over the world. Besides Europeans I could have noticed catholics, and not only catholics, from Both Americas, Africa, Asia and of course many Europeans too. I am agnostic but was glad to see people from different religions and races joined together and waiting for Pope to show up on his window and expressing good wishes to all people of good will. I guess we all, gathered on the suqare, were excited and full of joy feeling ourselves as a part of the world united.

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    Vatican - chiesa di San Pietro

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    The Basilica of St. Peter is probably the best known and the most visited among all churches on the earth. It isn't the largest church I have seen but it has huge proportions which could be noticed better only after entering inside of it.
    We probably all know it was designed by great Michelangelo, who started to work on it in his relatively older age. The project started in 1546 and when he died in 1564 only the drum had been completed. Michelangelo's work was continued and finished 1589 by Giacomo della Porta and Domenico Fontana.....

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    Hard Rock Cafe

    by GracesTrips Updated Jun 17, 2011

    I'm a pin collector. Sure, I can mail order various pins from around the world but that's not how I collect them. I want to visit that particular country and walk into the HRC and buy my pins. And, I did buy two of them and a T-shirt. This particular HRC is located in a beautiful area of Rome.

    The one in Rome is located at:
    Via Vittorio Veneto 62 a/b
    Rome 00187, Italy

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    Piazza di Pietra- Old and New

    by Arizona_Girl Written May 19, 2011

    On an easy walk from the Trevi to the Four Rivers Fountain (Piazza Navona) by way of the Pantheon. It is a small plaza with quaint little shops and cafes. There is modern art on display along with a building that instead of taring down the last of Hadrian's Temple, they used it and incorporated it into the new building. Cool little plaza to visit on your walk.

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    USO Rome Welcomes You - Serves You

    by icunme Updated May 12, 2011

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    This is just a welcoming place for U.S. military - full of information and lots of free perks - PC/internet, TV, staff to assist you, free snacks, drinks. Show your military-related ID at the street door and you will be admitted.
    From their service description:
    The USO Rome Center is located in the heart of the capital city of Italy. Conveniently located near the Vatican, our center's goal is to make Rome one of the most memorable and positive experiences of our patrons’ military service by offering a "Home while in Rome." Our center offers a wide range of FREE services including: area information, guidebooks, maps, Internet cafe w/ Skype, American canteen, comfortable TV lounge, luggage storage and the cleanest bathrooms in Rome. Want a Roman Holiday? Let the USO do the planning for you. Book one of our all inclusive vacation packages, which includes hotel, tours and meals! Check out our tours page for more information. And even if you are visiting only for a few days, we offer discounted prices on all hotels and tours booked through the USO Rome Center!

    * Note - If you do plan to vist, be sure to have your military-related ID with you - you will have to hold this ID up to the front door window as requested before you will be admitted.

    USO Rome Center
    Via Vespasiano, 44
    Roma - 00193 (Vatican Area)
    GPS Coordinates: N 41° 54.43' EO 12° 27.498'

    Hours of Operation:
    Monday-Saturday: 0830-1700
    Sundays: Closed

    Tel: 0039-06-397-27-419
    Fax: 0039-06-397-54-249
    E-mail: inforome@uso.org

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