Arch of Constantine, Rome

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  • Arco di Constantino
    Arco di Constantino
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  • Arco di Constantino and afar arco di Tito
    Arco di Constantino and afar arco di...
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  • arco at Tritone
    arco at Tritone
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  • goodfish's Profile Photo

    4th Century Recycling

    by goodfish Updated Feb 6, 2014

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    This arch is right next to the Colosseum, and commemorates Constantine I's 312 AD victory over his co-ruler, Maxentius, at the Battle of Milvian Bridge. Keep an eye out as you read through my pages as these two fellas will pop up in several other reviews.

    The structure spans the Via Triumphalis - a thoroughfare that was used for triumphal processions - and was largely created from borrowed/reworked bits of other buildings. Constantine claimed that his military achievement had been predicted in a vision of the Christian God but while he legalized and promoted the faith, many of the decorative symbols and figures on his arch reflect Roman mythology. The main inscription credits the victory to his "greatness of mind" with a vague mention of divine inspiration which could be applied to many deities. I've read that this may have been a deliberate act of diplomacy at a time when much of Rome still practiced old beliefs. Among other decorations are some statues that came from Trajan's forum, and reliefs depicting scenes from the battle.

    http://www.060608.it/en/cultura-e-svago/beni-culturali/beni-archeologici/arco-di-costantino.html

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    The arches of Rome

    by gwened Written Aug 24, 2013
    Arco di Constantino
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    the arches or triomphal gates into antique Rome is a wonderful thing to see and walk around, we enjoy walking around constantin, tito, and tritone

    The Arch of Titus is a 1st-century honorific arch located on the Via Sacra, Rome, just to the south-east of the Roman Forum. It was constructed in c. 82 AD by the Roman Emperor Domitian shortly after the death of his older brother Titus to commemorate Titus' victories, including the Siege of Jerusalem in 70 AD.

    The Arch of Constantine situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the latest of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, and the only one to make extensive use of spolia, re-using several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly-created for the arch.

    the one at Tritone and Barberini is a see thru arch under a wonderful architectural building that do not recalls the name so call it Tritone.

    The arch spans the Via Triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph. This route started at the Campus Martius, led through the Circus Maximus and around the Palatine Hill; immediately after the Arch of Constantine, the procession would turn left at the Meta Sudans and march along the Via Sacra to the Forum Romanum and on to the Capitoline Hill, passing both the Arches of Titus and Septimius Severus.

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Arch of Constantine

    by GentleSpirit Updated Feb 12, 2013

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    The Arch of Constantine, dedicated in 315AD celebrates Constantine's victory at the Battle of Malvian Bridge (312 AD). This is the famous battle where a vision appeared to Constantine. Constantine's troops carried the Christian symbol into battle and won against a larger force. This was the beginning of the Christian era in Rome.

    I found it somewhat odd though that this battle, being so essential in bringing Christianity to Rome, would not be honored more highly. After all, the Arch of Constantine contains medallions from other sights, almost like it was slapped together quickly.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by apbeaches Updated Jan 9, 2013
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    The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, next to the Colosseum & Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312. It is the oldest standing arch that used several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments.

    The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. It has three archways, the central one being 11.5 m high and 6.5 m wide, the lateral archways 7.4 m by 3.4 m each. The top attic is brickwork & marble. A staircase formed in the thickness of the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, in the end towards the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modeled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum. It has been suggested that the lower part of the arch is re-used from an older monument, probably from the times of the Emperor Hadrian. It is inscribed but I could not get close enough to read the inscriptions.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 30, 2012

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    The Arch of Constantine is the famous triumphal arch in Rome. It situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312.
    It is the latest of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, and the only one to make extensive use of spolia, re-using several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly-created for the arch.

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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Constantine’s Arch

    by von.otter Updated Mar 20, 2012

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    Constantine���s Arch, May 2007
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    “Farther on, is the arch of Constantine on the right, a most noble piece of architecture, almost entire… .”
    from “Travels through France and Italy,” 28.February.1765, by Tobias Smollett (1721-1771, Scottish poet and author)

    Arco di Constantino, Constantine’s Arch, was built in AD 315 by the Senate and the people of Rome. It was meant to honor Constantine’s victorious battle at the Ponte Milvio over his political rival, and former co-emperor, Maxentius.

    Demonstrating that Italians were the first recyclers, not all the arch’s decorations are from the time of its construction, the 4th century AD. Much of it was recycled from 2nd century AD monuments built by Trajan, Hadrian and Marcus Aurelius. Topping each of the four Corinthian columns on each side are figures of bound barbarians (see photo #4). Other decoration includes reliefs showing scenes from the Italian campaign of Constantine against Maxentius (see photo #3), which the monument was built to celebrate.

    Situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill, this triumphal arch, 68.89 feet high by 82 feet wide and 24.25 feet deep, is the newest of the remaining triumphal arches in Rome. Located on Via Triumphalis, part of the route that victorious generals rode in parade, starting in Campus Martius, to the Circus Maxiumus, around Palatine Hill, to Via Triumphalis to Via Sacra in the Forum.

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    Constantine’s Arch

    by adema29 Written Dec 9, 2011

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    Dacian
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    Constantine’s Arch in Rome with the three unequal arches and four Corinthian columns on each side, adorned with the Dacians statues on top of them is probably one of the most interesting monuments I have seen in Rome, in connection with Romanian history.

    It is said that the statues of the Dacians on Constantine’s Arch are statues of “Dacian’s prisoners”. It should be a joke, isn’t it?
    I’m wondering who in this World have ever made statues with “prisoners” and more than this to rise them up on an triumphal arch?

    Should we say instead that the Dacians on the Arch are probably some Dacians Heroes (at least) from those Dacians Wars?!
    It is really strange for me how the carved Dacians prisoners were “looking” down (!) at the “poor victorious” army coming back from the wars…?!
    Look at the faces of those statues… can you see any sign of humiliation on them?

    Would you rise your eyes, as a winner, at your prisoners standing above? Really strange, isn’t it?

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Arco di Constantino

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    This magnificent arch was built, most probably, to a previous Emperor od the 3rd century but then was renovated and dedicated to Emperor Constantine to celebrate his visit to Rome in 315 and his victory at Ponte Milvio.
    The major decorations of the arch comes from previous monuments to Emperor Trajan, Hadrian and Marcus Aurelius. There were two major fires in Rome in 3rd and 4th centuries and its possible that these monuments were badly affected by them. The fame of Trajan is associated with his military successes, while Hadrian provided the empire with the long period of peace.

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    The Arch of Constantine - Arco di Costantino

    by eksvist Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    before the Arch of Constantine
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    The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill.
    It was erected to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the latest of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, from which it differs by spolia, the extensive re-use of parts of earlier buildings.

    The arch is 21 m high, 25.7 m wide and 7.4 m deep. It has three archways, the central one being 11.5 m high and 6.5 m wide, the lateral archways 7.4 m by 3.4 m each. The lower part of the monument is built of marble blocks, the top (called attic) is brickwork reveted with marble. A staircase formed in the thickness of the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, in the end towards the Palatine Hill.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by mindcrime Written Mar 20, 2011

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    Emperor Constantine The Great (272-337, emperor from 306 to 337) won over Maxentius in 312 (in the battle of the Milvian Bridge) and 3 years later a triumphal arch was erected by the senate in Rome to honor him. Previous to the battle he supposed to have seen a vision of a cross in the sky with words “by this sign you shall conquer” following so he went, won the battle and converted into a Christian. The funny thing is that the arch was erected opposite Colloseum where the Christians had been thrown to the cute lions…

    Arch of Constantine is the largest in Rome as it is 21metres high and 26metres wide with 3 archways. There are many reliefs taken from other (earlier) structures but most of them have nothing to do with Constantine. And there’s no Christian signs of symbols too.

    At one side there is an inscription (in latin):
    "To the Emperor Caesar Flavius Constantinus Maximus, the pious and jubilant Augustus, the Senate and the peoples of Rome dedicate this arch as a token of his triumph as, by the inspiration of God and his magnanimity, he and his army liberated the state in rightful war from the tyrant and from all rebellion".

    I think I cant stand these arches anymore, we took some pictures (pic 2 was taken from Colosseum) but we got bored as there wasn’t much to do/see although I should have enjoyed this one that is dedicated to me… yes I have the same name with the emperor :)

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    Arch of Constantine

    by Maryimelda Written Aug 23, 2010

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    The Arch of Constantine

    No one seems to know who designed it but we do know that it was built in the fourth century after Constantine's victory against Maxentius on the Milvian Bridge in the year 312. It seems that Constantine and Maxentius were co-emperors and I guess they must have reached a point in time where there was one too many emperors, so one had to go. (I'm not the world's greatest historian)! Anyhoo Constantine won the battle and because he saw a sign in the heavens the night before telling him to go into battle under the sign of the cross, if he wanted to win, he decided to decriminalise Christianity. To commemorate the event, he commissioned the Arch of Constantine to be built right beside the Colosseum (where all the Christians had been thrown to the lions).

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    Arch of Constantine

    by June.b Updated Jun 23, 2010

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    beauty isn't it?
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    Juz beside the coloseo if you walk past it, the arch of constantine is a tribute to Constantine I's victory at the battle of mivian bridge in 312. The arch has a lot of carvings and details.

    The Arch du triomphe du carousel in Paris and the Marble arch of London is patterned from the Arch of Constantine.

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    Latest of the existing triumphal arches in Rome

    by Huks Written May 15, 2010
    The Arch of Constantine

    The Arch of Constantine is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge.

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    Constantine's Arch

    by Tom_Fields Written Dec 20, 2009

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    The Arch of Constantine
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    The Emperor Constantine (306-337 AD) took power in a bloody civil war. Following a vision of a cross in the sky, with the words "By this sign you shall conquer", he defeated his enemy Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312. After that, he converted to Christianity.

    His empire soon became Christian, too. He divided it into western and eastern parts, with their capitals in Rome and Constantinople, respectively. Hence the division of the Christian churches into western and eastern.

    The Roman Senate had this arch built in 315, to commemorate Constantine's victory over Maxentius. Of particular interest--something that most visitors probably miss--is a relief sculpture on the side, near the top. It shows Roman soldiers returning from a campaign in the Near East. They are carrying a Jewish menorah, the oldest known representation of this object.

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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    Arch of Constantine

    by tim07 Updated Aug 31, 2009

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    In AD 315 this triumphal arch was dedicated to Constantine to celebrate his victory over his co-emperor Maxentius. Most of the medallions & statues on the arch had been scavenged from earlier monuments.

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