Arch of Constantine, Rome

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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    Arch of Constantine

    by tim07 Updated Aug 31, 2009

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    In AD 315 this triumphal arch was dedicated to Constantine to celebrate his victory over his co-emperor Maxentius. Most of the medallions & statues on the arch had been scavenged from earlier monuments.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by vichatherly Written Jun 4, 2009

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    Arch of Constantine

    This splendid arch is situated very near ro the Colosseum and is a great spot to arrange to meet people.

    This is the most recent of the three remaining imperial arches in Rome (the other ones are the nearby Arch of Titus and Arch of Septimius Severus).

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    Arch of Constantine

    by roamer61 Written May 2, 2009

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    Located in the heart of what was once Ancient Rome, and close to the Colesseum, this is one of several arches fould throughout Rome built by the Romans. It is a triumpant arch erected in the year 316 to commemorate Constantines victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312. Through this period, the Roman Empire was ruled by 2 emperors, one iruled the east, the other the west. After a series of wars, Constantine emerged the sole ruler and for a breif, glorious period, reunited all of the empire under a single emperor. For this reason, Constantine I often goes by the name, Constantine the Great.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by fdrich29 Written Feb 12, 2009

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    The Arch of Constantine was built to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312. It was dedicated in 315 and is one of three Triumphal Arches still standing in Rome, with the Arch of Titus and Arch of Septimius Severus. The Arch is situated between Palantine Hill and Colosseo, and is an impressive monument. No admission fee is required to see the Arch.

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    The symbol of Christianity

    by monica71 Written Jan 23, 2009

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    Arch of Constantine from the Colosseum
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    Emperor Constantin had a vision that he would defeat Maxentius in the battle of the Milvian Bridge under the sign of the cross. He won the battle and in 312 AD he became the sole emperor of the Roman Empire.

    After the battle emperor Constantin (whose mother and sister were already Christian) legalized Christianity and ordered the arch to be built.

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    Triumph III

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Aug 10, 2008

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    Both the triumphal arches outside the Forum were dedicated to the Emperor Constantine, though one is now known as the Arch of Janus - a name given to it in the Middle Ages for its double-faced arch (A god with two faces who could see both comings and goings, Janus was the protector of doors, gates, bridges and arches). Known as a quadrifrons arch, the Arch of Janus has 4 arches as it was built across a crossroads. The Arch of Marcus Aurelius in Tripoli is a similar construction though somewhat older.

    By the time the Arch of Janus was built, Rome itself was no longer the centre of the Empire. Constantine had moved his capital to Constantinople, far to the east, some years before, and it seems most likely that this arch, dedicated as it was to the "Divine Constantines" was erected in the time of Constantine II, perhaps for an occasion such as his visiting the city. Monumental as it is, and the only example of a four-sided arch remaining in the city, it was actually built of "spolia" - masonry reclaimed from older buildings and ruins. Used as an trading area in the early Middle Ages, it owes much of its survival to its subsequent conversion and use right up to the early 19th century as a fortress.

    The Arch of Constantine, adjacent to the Colosseum, was erected to commemorate Constantine's victory over the rebel forces of Maxentius at the Milvian Bridge in 312 AD that ended years of civil war. Although the Republican tradition decreed that triumphs were only to be awarded after victory over a foreign enemy, times had changed and emperors were ever accorded honours over and above mere men.

    As with the Arch of Janus, a lot of recycled material went into the building of this arch - not only basic materials but also statues and reliefs, some of which were re-worked to more closely resemble the emperor. This arch is certainly the best-preserved of Rome's triumphal arches. Like that of Titus and Janus it was used for many years as part of a private family's fortifications.

    Just as the Arch of Titus has huge - and tragic - significance for Jews, marking as it does the beginning of the Diaspora, the Arch of Constantine is of major significance to Christianity as it celebrates the victory that led Constantine to declare Christianity the official religion of the empire. Although not a Christian himself, the night before the battle Constantine had a vision of the Cross and the words, "By this sign, conquer." He obeyed the sign, the battle was won and the western world was changed forever.

    Although in generally better condtion than the Arches of Titus and Septimius Severus, much the sculpture on Constantine's Arch is not of the same fine quality as these earlier works, yet another example of the decline of the city by this time. The Arch of Janus has lost all its sculptures as well as its attic and top.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by wilocrek Written Jan 14, 2008

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    "The Arch of Constantine (Italian: Arco di Constantino) is a triumphal arch in Rome, situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312 AD. Dedicated in 315, it is the latest of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, from which it differs by spolia, the extensive re-use of parts of earlier buildings." I actually really don't know much of the history so thanks to Wikipedia we both now know a little more. All in all its really a pretty amazing thing to see, considering the condition and the proximity to the Coliseum.

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    ARCH OF CONSTANTINE

    by DAO Updated Dec 28, 2007

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    The Arco di Constantino (Arch of Constantine) commemorates Emporer Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge on October 28, 312 AD. This was the defeat on Italian soil was of a rival to the Throne. Interestingly Constantine was crown Emporer or ‘Augustus’ in Eboracum (York) – Engalnd. Despite its age, it is the ‘newest’ of the 3 existing Trumphal Arches in Rome. The arch spans the route taken by the emperors when they re-entered Rome in triumph known as the Via Triumphalis. Its dimensions are:
    Height: 21 meters
    Width: 25.7 meters
    Depth: 7.4 meteres
    It’s construction is an example of by Spolia which is the extensive re-use of parts of older buildings.

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    Arco di Costantino (Arch of Constantine)

    by MM212 Written May 17, 2007

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    Arch of Constantine & the Colosseum
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    Emperor Constantine's triumphal arch was built in 315 AD to celebrate his victories. Most of the sculptures on the arch were transferred from older Roman monuments, including Trajan's Forum. The Arch of Constantine occupies a monumental position at the end of Via di San Gregorio and between the Colosseum and the southern entrance to the Roman Forum.

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  • kayleigh06's Profile Photo

    Arch Of Constantine

    by kayleigh06 Updated Apr 22, 2007

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    Between the Colosseum and Palatine Hill is the very impressive triple arch built to honour Constantine following his victory in a battle. The arch in itself is very impressive with the deatil put into the carvings in the stone. You can't miss it when at the Colosseum.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 28, 2007
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    Immediately in front of the Colisseum, the Arch of Constantine was dedicated in 315 AD to celebrate Constantines' victory over his co-Emperor Maxentius. Oddly, considering the arch celebrates his claim that his victory was inspired by a vision of Christ, most of the statues, releifs etc featured are pilfered from other, earlier monuments. And little in terms of Christian subject matter actually feature!

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    arch of constantine

    by doug48 Written Jul 25, 2006

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    arch of constantine

    between the south end of the forum and the colosseum is the arch of constantine. it as erected in 315AD to celebrate constantine's victory over maxentius. the reliefs on this massive arch were scavenged from earlier monuments around the forum.

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Arco di Constantino

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jun 23, 2006

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    A fantastic structure and the biggest and best preserved of the Roman Arches of triumph, the Arch of Constantine rises south of the Coliseum.

    Erected by the Roman Senate after the victory of Constantine over Maxentius in the battle at the Milvian bridge to honor the 'freer and bearer of peace'.

    Many of the decorations come from structures built in previous ages and for this reason many reliefs have nothing to do with Constantine. The friezes on the long and short sides belong to the era of Constantine and represent the events preceeding the battle at the Milvin Bridge til the Emperor's triumphal procession in Rome.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by jungles Updated Jun 1, 2006

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    Arch of Constantine

    This triumphal arch, one of only three left standing in Rome today, was dedicated in 315 A.D. It had been built to honour the emperor Constantine's victory over the previous emperor, Maxentius, at the Battle of Milvian Bridge three years before. It is said that prior to the battle Constantine had a dream or vision in which he saw the image of the cross and heard the words 'with this sign you will conquer.' Because of this he ordered the sign of the cross to be painted on the shields of all his soldiers. At that battle Maxentius drowned in the Tiber river, and Constantine became the first Christian emperor of Rome, subsequently legalised Christianity throughout the emperor, and changed the course of history.

    Many of the friezes and other sculptural elements on the arch itself were pillaged from previous monuments erected in honour of some of the great emperors of the past like Trajan, Hadrian, and Marcus Aurelius. The arch straddles the Via Triumphalis, the triumphal way which was the processional route used by victorious Roman armies returning from war. An ancient fountain called the Meta Sudans once stood in front of it, but the fascist dictator Mussolini had this bulldozed in the 1930s because he wanted to be able to march his own troops under the Arch of Constantine without impediment. When the Olympics were held in Rome in 1960 the athletes running the marathon passed under the arch just before crossing the finish line. Nowadays there is a metal fence which prohibits people from walking underneath it.

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    Arch of Constantine

    by Jenniflower Updated May 23, 2006

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    A lovely arch, it's the largest in Rome of its kind, and was built in 315AD.

    It is 25m high, 21m wide and 11m deep.

    It is symbolic in the fact that the Emporer Constantine brought Christianity into an otherwise pagain Rome, when under the leadership of Emporer Maxentius.

    It stands to the side of the coliseum, just before you tackle the heavily cobbled road of Via Sacre which leads to the forum, and is well worth checking out, as it has incredible detail.

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