Area Sacra Largo Argentina, Rome

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Largo di Torre Argentina

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  • Area Sacra Largo Argentina
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  • Area Sacra Largo Argentina
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  • Area Sacra Largo Argentina
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  • jungles's Profile Photo

    Largo di Torre Argentina

    by jungles Updated Jun 11, 2006

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    Ruins of Largo Argentina

    This archeological site in Rome is relatively unknown to most visitors, and yet it has great historical importance, it's centrally located and easy to find, and it's free! Right in the centre of this busy transport hub you can see the remains of four ancient temples that date back to the Republican era, prior to the Roman Empire. The oldest one was built in the 3rd or possibly 4th century B.C. There is still some debate about the exact identification of the temples, and for now they are simply called Temples A, B, C, and, you guessed it, D.

    Also visible is the remains of the portico of the Theatre of Pompey, which is actually where Julius Caesar was assassinated. Thanks to Shakespeare, most people think Caesar was killed in the Senate building (the Curia) in the Roman Forum, but the Curia had burned down several years prior, and the Senate was temporarily meeting in the theatre until reconstruction was complete. What's left of the portico is on the west side of the excavated area on Via Arenula. Interestingly, the remains of the theatre itself were used as foundations for later buildings, which is evident because the modern street now curves in a semi-circle, imitating the shape of the theatre. To find this street, head south down Via Arenula, then take the first right (Vicolo de' Chiodaroli). From here you can pass through a small archway to reach Campo de' Fiori.

    Largo Argentina is also famous for its cat sanctuary. Cats have been revered in Rome for centuries, possibly starting with Cleopatra's visit here 2,000+ years ago. Volunteer doctors spay and neuter them, and other volunteers help out by feeding the cats (here and around other ruins such as the Forum) or by offering guided tours of the ruins in exchange for a donation to the cat sanctuary. You will see many cats lounging around the ruins here. Check out the website for more information on the sanctuary and on how to volunteer or adopt a cat.

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    Torre Argentina Cat shelter Rome

    by catnl Updated May 3, 2006

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    Torre Argentina, Roman Cats shelter April 2006
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    offcourse i visited the catshelter for roman cats, its located on a big square and when you go downstairs at one ohf the corners you can see the shelter and you can walk in and talk to the people (volunteers) who are at work.
    When i was there there was a woman from News Sealand and we talked about the work and the cats, many cats are sick and have a special big room where the cats have their own space, even the blind ones can find their way here:-)
    When you buy souveirs you support this great organization
    The founders are: Silvia Viviani and Deborah DÁlessandro

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    • Travel with Pets
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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Area Sacra

    by Jim_Eliason Written Oct 24, 2005

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    Area Sacra
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    This area is the excavated remains of 4 temples a few blocks south of the Pantheon at Largo Argentina. Again there is a small charge to go down into the ruins but it can all be seen from street level looking down so there is no need to pay this charge.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Area Sacra di Largo Argentina - Temple of Feronia

    by Willettsworld Updated Jul 30, 2005

    The remains of four temples were discovered in the 1920's at the centre of Largo Argentina. They date from the era of the Republic and are among the oldest found in Rome. The area is now crawling with cats. See how many you can spot in the photo!

    The Temple of Feronia (also known as "Temple C"), the furthest to the left when viewed facing Teatro Argentina, is the oldest and dates from the early 3rd century BC. It was placed on a high placed on a high platform preceded by an altar and is typical of Italic temple plans as opposed to the Greek model.

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    Area Sacra di Largo Argentina - Temple B

    by Willettsworld Updated Jul 30, 2005

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    Temple B, known as Temple of the Fortune of the Present Day, is a rare circular structure consisting of six remaining columns, the original flight of stairs and the altar. It was Constructed by Quintus Lutacius Catulus in 101 BC.

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    Area Sacra di Largo Argentina - Temple of Juturna

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 30, 2005

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    Temple A (which maybe called Temple of Juturna) is from the 3rd century BC, but in medieval times the small church of San Nicola di Cesarini was built over it's podium and the remains of it's two apses are still visable.

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    Et tu Brute?

    by CTnightowl Updated Apr 11, 2005

    Beware the Ides of March. In the far back(at the busstop) is where Julius Caeser met his death. The ruins below are now a cat sanctuary. It seems Rome used to have a rat problem so they let cats take care their problem Cats are given special status and this place is a haven for them. There are hundreds in this area

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  • Julius_Caesar's Profile Photo

    Area Sacra

    by Julius_Caesar Written Feb 12, 2005

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    In the 1920s the remains of four temples (dating from the 4th-3rd century B.C. Since we don’t know what temples were, they’re simply called A, B, C and D. Behind temples B and C are remains of a great platform of tufa blocks, which have been identified as part of the Curia of Pompey, where the Senate met and where Julius Caesar’s was assassinated on 15 March 44 B.C.

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    Cat Sanctuary

    by sandysmith Updated Nov 4, 2004

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    local resident of the temples

    Today people come to the sunken area of Largo Argentina - not only to look at the temple ruins but more likely I suspect to see the cats that live here. The whole area acts as a scantuary for them - they are fed daily and there is a scheme whereby you can adopt a roman cat - financially that is!

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  • Webboy's Profile Photo

    Largo di Torre Argentina

    by Webboy Updated Feb 17, 2004

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    You can see a few cats if you look closely!

    We accidentally stumbled across Largo di Torre Argentina while walking towards the Pantheon.

    We were a little unsure of what to be taken aback by here.

    Was it the impressive remains of the 4 temples, the amount of traffic whizzing by it as though it wasn't even there, or the vast amounts of stray cats that had taken up residence between the ruins?

    I think the cats won it. Strange as it may seem, the ruins within Largo di Torre Argentina are impressive, but you cannot help stand there wondering why on earth there are so many cats. I think we counted over 30!

    Someone obviously looks after them, as there were feeding boxes and cat kennels spread around the ruins.

    The Largo di Torre Argentina ruins are impressive, but if you don't want to see them, then at least go to see the cats!

    Its quite fascinating.......if even a little eery!

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    The Area Sacra

    by janchan Written Jul 31, 2003

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    the Area Sacra of Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome

    Largo di Torre Argentina is an amazing square not far from the Pantheon or Trastevere. Right in the middle, there is the so called Area Sacra (Holy area), ruins of four roman temples (between II and IV cen. BC):

    - temple of Giuturna
    - Aedes Fortunae Huiusce Diei
    - temple of Feronia
    - sanctuary of Lari Permarini

    The area is also well known as the paradise of stray cats.

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  • phred1910's Profile Photo

    Unnamed Ruins

    by phred1910 Written Jul 9, 2003
    Anyone know what these are?

    While we still have no idea what these ruins are, they were fascinating nonetheless. It was also amusing to watch the wild cats lie in the shade. I imagined great Lions doing the same in the olden days, but of course this is misguided.

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  • Torre Argentina: A Real Roman Cat Shelter

    by fraugefahr Written Jun 10, 2003

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    A cat from the sanctuary sitting in the ruins.

    If any of you are interested in seeing something off the beaten path (the beaten tourist path that is) in Rome, try checking out Torre Argentina, a cat shelter in the heart of the city. http://www.romancats.com/ They are situated on the ancient ruins near the Tower of Argentina (Torre Argentina) in the heart of the city, near the Pantheon.

    Two Italian women just started taking care of all of the abandoned cats that were dumped there in the ruins and over the years they developed a full fledged cat shelter. All of the cats are sterilized and vaccinated and every effort is made to adopt them. A lot of vets in Italy don't want to sterilize animals, but this shelter has found one that is sympathetic to the cause and sterilizes all of their cats at a low cost. They are doing great work and can use all the donations and volunteers they can get. The city tried to get rid of them for a long time, but so many tourists wrote letters asking that they be allowed to continue their work that the city has allowed them to stay.

    So, if you are interested in something that not every tourist in Rome sees, go down to the cat shelter. You will also get to see ancient ruins (4 of the oldest temple ruins in Rome are on this site), and a lot of Roman cats!

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    Area Sacra a.k.a. the Cat Forum

    by martin_nl Updated Jun 2, 2003

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    The by cats inhabited Area Sacra

    A few hundred stray cats inhabit the Area Sacra, that is why the locals like to refer to it as the Cats Forum. Some of them are really sweet, and it is possible to pet them. They not only walk in the forum, but also on the square around it.

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    Area Sacra dell'Argentina

    by martin_nl Updated Jun 2, 2003

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    Area Sacrum dell'Argentina

    The four republic era temples - conveniently called temples A, B, C and D - were discovered during construction work in the 1920s. Some parts of the temples are still under the roads, so only parts are visible. Behind temples B and C a part of the Curia of Pompejus is visible. This was the place when the Senate met on March 15th 44BC, en Julius Caesar was murdered.

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