Campidoglio - Capitoline Hill, Rome

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  • Piazza del Campidoglio
    Piazza del Campidoglio
    by zadunajska8
  • Monument. HDR.
    Monument. HDR.
    by londontraveller01
  • Campidoglio, Rome. HDR.
    Campidoglio, Rome. HDR.
    by londontraveller01
  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Vittoriano

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 11, 2009

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    The Vittoriano, Rome's memorial to the father of modern Italy - Vittorio Emanuele II - and arguably the city's most prominent landmark (perhaps only overshadowed by the Colosseum?), looks like a giant white elephant. It is the object of ridicule of many Romans, as well as ordinary tourists for its garishness. Criticisms aside, the memorial houses Italy's version of tomb of the unknown soldier - so it's national importance is never to be underestimated.

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    Capitoline Hill

    by sandysmith Written Apr 12, 2003

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    Capitoline

    The Capitoline Hill, one of the seven hills of Rome, was the centre of religious life in Rome and the site of several very important sactuaries and temples. Today it is the centre of the municipal government of Rome, which is housed in renaissance palaces alongside the Capitoline Museums.

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    Musei Capitolini, Marcus Aurelius

    by von.otter Updated Jun 9, 2008

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    Marcus Aurelius, Palazzo dei Conservatori, 05/07
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    “Dig within. Within is the wellspring of Good; and it is always ready to bubble up, if you just dig.”
    — Emperor Marcus Aurelius (AD 121-180)

    AFFECTING THE SOUL We were delighted with the addition of this new glass-covered exhibition hall — the Sala Marco Aurelio — at the Palazzo Nuovo. Its centerpiece is the equestrian bronze of Marcus Aurelius, which was once in the center of Piazza del Campidoglio. When we visited in 2000/2001, the original was kept in a small, dimly lit room behind a glass partition. What a welcomed improvement this new arrangement is! To be able to circle this work wholly was a thrill.

    In 1981, the original, 11-foot-6-inch-tall, bronze (see photos #2–#5) of Marcus Aurelius that Michelangelo placed in the piazza was removed. Because it suffered effects of weather and pollution, it needed extensive conservation; at the same time a copy (see photo #1) was made and placed in the piazza in 1997.

    Marcus Aurelius’ raised right arm can be seen as a greeting, and it could also symbolize the emperor’s clemency; it is thought that a barbarian enemy once cowered beneath the horse’s raised foreleg pleading for mercy. The monument was believed to be formerly gilded. A local belief says that the monument will turn gold again on the Judgment Day.

    Because the rider was mistaken for Constantine, the first Christian Roman emperor, this bronze survived, in all its glory, the Church’s anti-pagan campaigns. It gives us an idea of how fabulous Ancient Rome must have looked with so many works of art of this high quality scattered about. The original equestrian monument, which dates from AD 173, stood in the Piazza di San Giovanni in Laterano before it was transported by order of Pope Paul III for Michelangelo’s use in his redesign of the Piazza del Campidoglio in 1538.

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    the best of the seven hills

    by solopes Updated Dec 18, 2013

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    Rome - Italy

    Drawn by Michelangelo, the square and staircase of Campidoglio compose a very harmonic ensemble, that didn't deserve to be "hidden" behind the "monster" of Vittorio Emanuel II monument.

    The geometry of the square is carefully planned, and the palaces that surround it, built during the 16th and 17th centuries, respect the master's criteria.

    A church - St. Maria in Aracueli - museums in the palaces, and very interesting statues all around, advice you to reserve several hours to its visit. If you can! We couldn't, and that's why Campidoglio remains in my Rome's "to see" agenda.

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    Palazzo Senatorio

    by MM212 Written May 9, 2007

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    Palazzo Senatorio (Apr 09)
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    Palazzo Senatorio is the office of the mayor of Rome. The building faces Piazza del Campidoglio on the Capitoline Hill on one side, and the Roman Forum on the other. Although the palazzo was built in the 12th century (and used as the Roman Senate), the façade was redesigned and built in the 16th century, by Michelangelo who also designed the Piazza, as well as the façades of the other adjacent buildings.

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  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Campidoglio

    by Polly74 Updated May 20, 2004

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    Campidoglio Hill

    This is the one of most famous hill of Rome.
    Recent archaeological finds have determined that the history of this square is in fact earlier than believed, confirming that its slopes were already inhabited as far back as the Iron Age (1300 BC), therefore much earlier than the symbolic year of 753 in which the mythical Romulus is believed to have founded the city.
    Campidoglio square (CApitol) spreads out at the top of the grand steps and is the result of a renaissance project ordered by Pope Paul III in the 16° century.
    Michelangelo carried out this work of art with the aim of creating a monumental complex that was worthy of Rome and the Augustus hill.
    One of the very nice buildings around Campidoglio Square is Rome's Town Hall.

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    Capitol Hill

    by sniem Written Jul 25, 2003

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    Capitol hill

    A great place to start your sightseeing tour in Rome. Great views of Rome. Beautiful square designed by Michelangelo Buonarotti. The monument in the middle is the ancient statue of Marc Aurel. If you leave it on the back left side you can see the Romolus and Remus statue and have a great view on the Forum Romanum

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    Cordonata & Piazza di capitoglio

    by mindcrime Written Mar 20, 2011

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    Cordonata Capitolina
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    Cordonata Capitolina (pics 1-2) is the famous sloping ramp (actually transversal stripes of stone that create slightly inclined steps) that connects piazza Venezia with Campidoglio. It was built by Michelangelo and features at the bottom 2 small fountains with the sculptures of Egyptian lions on them while at the top of Cordonata you can see 2 sculptures of Castor and Pollux.

    We went up the steps to see the Campidoglio square(pic 3) that was also designed by Michelangelo. In the middle of the square you can see a replica of an equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelus, the original can been seen inside the Capitoline Museums that spread out on 3 different buildings that face the square:
    1)palazzo Senatorio. It was built in 13th century and housed the archives of ancient Rome. In our days it’s Rome’s City Hall.
    2)palazzo dei Conservatori. It was built during the medieval times on the spot where an ancient temple once stood(the same goes for church Santa Maria in Aracoeli next to Campidoglio square)
    3)palazzo Nuovo. The “New Palace” was built in 17th century

    The Capitoline museum is the oldest public art collection in Europe (it was founded by Pope Sixtus IV in 1471). It has some great sculptures and a lot of portrait paintings (we got bored with them)

    The Museum is open Tuesday to Sunday, 9.00-20.00
    The entrance fee is 6,5euros

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    Piazza del Campidoglio

    by Julius_Caesar Written Jan 30, 2005

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    ramp

    Michelangelo designed the paving of the square and a third building (in addition to the Palazzo Senatorio and Palazzo dei Conservatori), Palazzo Nuovo, symmetrical to Palazzo dei Conservatori. On top of the ramp (the Cordonata) are the statues of Castor and Pollux, the protectors of Rome, and in the middle of the square is a bronze equestrian statue of the emperor Marcus Aurelius, dating from the 2nd century AD.

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    The Capitoline Revisited

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Capitoline Hill

    Outside of the Forum and the Campidoglio, the Capitoline Hill walks you along a cobbled staircase, where views of the ancient, the medieval and the modern stand nearly side by side. I know of few places in the city where you can hide in a arbor away from the bustle of modern Rome, where only a few short steps will put you in touch with the Forum, some of the city's best museums, and a host of great churches. One of the greatest views by far in the Eternal City is looking out from behind the Senatorial Palace over the vast ruins of the Roman Forum. The Capitoline - one of the great escapes in Rome.

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    Center of Activity

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Vitt. Emanuele II, S. Maria Aracoeli, museums

    The Campidoglio is near the heart of a great number of things. The Palazzo dei Conservatori, the Senatorial Palace and overlook of the Roman Forum, Santa Maria in Aracoeli and Mussolini's Typewriter are all within easy reach of this square, which itself is reached by the short jaunt up the Cordonata.

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Palazzo Senatorio

    by Tijavi Updated Nov 20, 2009

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    Palazzo Senatorio houses Rome's city government
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    Located at the eastern side of Piazza del Campidoglio, the Palazzo Senatorio is a magnificent piece of renaissance architecture. It is the seat of Rome's city government. Aside from its splendid architecture whose facade was designed by architects Giacomo della Porta and Girolamo Rainaldi, there is a beautiful fountain at the base of the facade depicting the river gods of the Nile and Tiber (photos 3 and 4). The balcony beside the palazzo offers a good vantage point for taking pictures of the Roman Forum site.

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  • mcbeal_ally's Profile Photo

    Capitol Hill

    by mcbeal_ally Updated Mar 17, 2007

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    Capitol, highest of the seven hills of ancient Rome, historic and religious center of the city. The great temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, on its southern summit, was dedicated in 509 B.C.; it was foremost among the temples and altars of Rome. Destroyed three times by fire, it was last rebuilt by the emperor Domitian. On the northern summit of the Capitol was the citadel (arx). On the side overlooking the Forum stood the Tabularium, where the state archives were kept. Until the 1st cent. A.D., state criminals were hurled to their death from the Tarpeian Rock, on the steep south face of the hill. In the Middle Ages the Capitol remained the political center of Rome. The center of municipal government in modern Rome is on the same location. In the 16th cent. Michelangelo designed the present plan. A flight of steps leads to the square on top of the hill; on one side of the square is the Palazzo dei Conservatori, on the other, the Capitoline Museum. Both buildings now house collections of antiquities. In the center of the square is the ancient equestrian bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

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    Castor and Pollux

    by jungles Written Jun 3, 2006

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    Castor (or is it Pollux?) on the Campidoglio

    Castor and Pollux originally come from Greek mythology and were later borrowed by the Romans, as is the case with almost the entire pantheon of Roman mythology. They were twin brothers born as the result of the god Zeus taking the form of a swan and seducing the mortal Leda. Thus the twins are only half-immortal. They are also referred to as the Dioscuri or as the Gemini, which means twins in Latin. The Gemini constellation (and zodiac sign) is named after them, and its two brightest stars are named Castor and Pollux.

    In Rome they were credited with helping the young Roman Republic win a battle against its enemy the Latins, and so a temple was built in honour of them in the Roman Forum in 484 B.C. Several other temples to them were built in Rome throughout its history. Michelangelo's design called for two ancient sculpures of the twins, recovered from an ancient temple, to be placed at the top of the Cordonata. Two statues stand there today, but in fact they are not the ones Michelangelo had in mind. Those statues ended up in the piazza in front of the Palazzo del Quirinale under one of Rome's obelisks. The two on the Campidoglio are also ancient statues that have been heavily restored, though they are from a different temple. If you look closely you will see many cracks where the broken pieces were put together.

    In modern times, the twins' names were used in the John Woo movie Face/Off, in which Nicholas Cage plays Castor Troy, a terrorist whose partner-in-crime is his twin brother Pollux.

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    Capitoline Hill

    by ayesh Written Feb 5, 2003

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    The Capitoline Hill was the center of the holiest religious and political ceremonies. It was the symbol of the power of Rome in the ancient days.
    You can reach the center of the Piazza del Campidoglio (this is ´Capitoline´ in Italian), designed by Michelangelo, by climbing the wide stairs Cordonata. On top you will be welcomed by the giant statues of Castor and Pollux. The car-free hill gives space to the Capitoline Museum, which is very, very nice. It comprises two buildings: the Palazzo Nuovo and the Palazzo dei Conservatori.
    On the south end of the hill you can take a glance off of the Tarpeian Rock. Traitors used to be thrown off this steep cliff...
    Oh yes and don´t forget to check out the 6th centrury church Santa Maria in Aracoeli; it has many lovely old artifacts hidden inside. And legend goes that if you climb up the stairs to the church on your knees, you will win the 100,000 (don´t know what currency though,haha).
    Last but not least: stuck to the side of the Capitoline Hill is the Roman Insula (insulae = flats). This apartment builing from the 2nd century shows how low the ground was all those years ago. Only the 3rd and 4th floor stick out of the grond nowadays.
    I would suggest to find out what more can be seen on the Capitoline Hill by walking around, over, and through it!

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