Campo dei Fiori, Rome

4 out of 5 stars 60 Reviews

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  • Tomatoes, tomatoes
    Tomatoes, tomatoes
    by TheWanderingCamel
  • Campo dei Fiori
    by goodfish
  • market square
    market square
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  • theodoreconrad's Profile Photo

    Great place for a drink

    by theodoreconrad Written Aug 4, 2007

    Roma didn't really seem like the 'party' type of town, but this place is much different. There are many bars and shops surrounding the square, and the square is filled with many many people. I was there around the time of the Wales v. Italia match, and it was madness. As I was climbing the statue of Giordano Bruno to try to find my friends, some guy picked up my beer bottle and hurled it into the crowd hitting a Welshman in the face and starting a small riot. Once you've had enough of the loud party here, go buy an enormous bottle of wine and drink it with some friends at the Trevi fountain, there's always lots of people there.

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    Campo de'Fiori Market

    by leffe3 Updated May 27, 2007

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    The market in Campo de'Fiori (Field of Flora) has been here since Rennaissance times, surrounded as it is with grand palazzos and public buildings, making it a diverse place of courtesans, cardinals, merchants and nobles mixing with fishmongers and vegetable sellers - a tradition very much in keeping with the present day market and environment. It's a lively place, full of atmosphere, coffee shops and reasonablly-priced restaurants and pizzerias making it a mecca for nightlife as well as a fascinating place to people watch during the day.

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    Campo de Fiori

    by Henrik_rrb Updated Apr 18, 2007

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    Campo de Fiori by night
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    An old market place that also nowadays works as one during the days. In the nights the piazza turns into very popular place for both romans and tourists, with lots of restaurants and bars surrounding the square.

    The market starts at 8am (I've heard, there is no chance whatsoever that I would be there that early...) and then goes on during the whole day.

    In the middle of the "il campo" which also is the same word for football pitch you'll find the statue of Giordano Bruno, who stands there with a cowl over his head. He was one of the 1600s most famous philosophers, and for the incredible crime of saying that Earth went around the sun, and not the other way around, he was burnd to death on Christmas Day in the year 1600. The piazza was for a while well used for executions like this.

    Much nicer area now I have to say, with a lot of people going around in both day and evenings. Around the corner you'll find at least two fantastic ice cream shops, where they had the best ice cream I've ever eaten in Rome.

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  • Taffster's Profile Photo

    Bustling Market and downtown-style cafes

    by Taffster Written Nov 16, 2006

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    Watching the world go by

    Just south of Piazza Navona, Campo di Fiori is a modest square with a nice number of cafes and cocktail bars. It's way cheaper than Navona too, although we still paid just over 5 Euros for 2 cans of Coke.

    Campo di Fiori also had a fruit, veg and flowers market whist we were there. This was on a Thursday, but it may be daily.

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    Shopping and gawking

    by NedHopkins Written Oct 25, 2006

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    Beginning about 8:00 in the morning, vendors set up tables and awnings on and under which they sell fresh and canned foods, fish and meat, household and personal goods, souvenirs, and (especially) flowers.

    From lunchtime to late in the evening there are several restaurants with abundant outdoors seating.

    In the center of the Campo is a memorial to Giordano Bruno, one of the finest intellects of the late Renaissance. The Church burned him -- alive -- on Christmas Day 1600 for believing, of all things, that the earth revolves about the sun.

    At night the Campo is a scene of drinking and partying.

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  • newsphotogirl's Profile Photo

    Campo de' Fiori

    by newsphotogirl Updated Oct 21, 2006

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    Located near the Piazza Navona. Campo de' Fiori is a great place to get away from the throng of tourists elsewhere. The streets surrounding the square are named for various trades such as the Via dei Giubbonari (tailors) and Via dei Chiavari (Keymakers).

    Campo de' Fiori translates as "field of flowers". A bustlilng street market filled with fruits, vegetables, flowers, anything you could want. It is very similar to the farmer's market in the U.S. My husband and I walked around and sampled the food from different booths including some amazing cheese and pastries. We ultimately bought a jar of organic nocciole (hazelnut) to go with our breakfast. Yummmm.

    In the center of the square is the statue of Giordano Bruno, the philosopher burned at the stake at for heresy in 1600.

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  • stom23's Profile Photo

    Chilling at Campo de'Fiori

    by stom23 Written Oct 5, 2006

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    You can't walk around the historic center of Roma without stopping at Campo de'Fiori: this quite small square is so typically Italian because of its daily market and life here just never stops! You'll find people around night and day.

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  • rcsparty's Profile Photo

    Campo d'Fiori

    by rcsparty Updated Sep 6, 2006

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    This seemed to be a piazza least touched by the tourist throng. In the morning the campo contains a vibrant fruit/vegatable market. Once the market is cleared and the piazza is cleaned, it is a great place to relax for a little break. The hooded statue in the middle is Giordano Bruno, who made the mistake of voicing his opinion that the earth revolved around the sun during the days of the Inquisition. After having a stake driven through his tongue, he was burned at the stake. Today, the statue is seen as a monument to free speech.

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  • jungles's Profile Photo

    One of Rome's best piazzas

    by jungles Updated Jun 10, 2006

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    Facades in Campo de' Fiori

    Campo de' Fiori means 'Field of Flowers,' and indeed this place was nothing more than a grassy field until the 15th century. Though it has now been paved with the cobblestones that cover nearly all of Rome's streets, it has still escaped the modern commercialism seen in other parts of the city. Campo de' Fiori is a beautiful square and a great place to take a break from sightseeing and experience a bit of real Roman life. Every morning from Monday to Saturday there is a fruit and vegetable market that covers the square. You will see many locals coming to buy their produce here; it's certainly much cheaper than the fruit carts that prey on tourists around the major sights. By around 3pm the stalls have packed up, the street cleaners move in to clean up the mess, and it becomes a great place to sit at an outside table at one of the many cafes and restaurants and watch the world go by. In the evening some of those quiet cafes become rather rowdy bars; this is a popular nightspot for young locals and foreigners alike.

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  • jungles's Profile Photo

    Giordano Bruno

    by jungles Written Jun 10, 2006

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    Giordano Bruno statue

    In the middle of Campo de' Fiori is a statue of a hooded figure looking down sternly at the passersby below. The figure is that of Giordano Bruno, who was brought to the Campo with a spike through his tongue and burned at the stake on this very spot on February 17, 1600. Bruno had been deemed a heretic by the Inquisition for, amongst other things, his belief that the earth revolves around the sun and that the universe is infinite. The statue was designed by Ettore Ferrari and erected here in 1887 at the behest of a groups of Italian Masonic orders. It is seen as a monument to free speech and thought. Not until 400 years after his death was an official acknowledgement of error given by the Catholic Church through Pope John Paul II, and even then Bruno was not fully rehabilitated and is technically still viewed by the church as a heretic.

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  • Lacristina's Profile Photo

    Campo dei Fiori - Find it and Get Lost!

    by Lacristina Updated Jun 7, 2006

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    Vendors and buyers at Campo dei Fiori

    Campo dei Fiori (it translates Field of Flowers, but don't expect a pastoral setting -- it was paved over in the 15th century) is another lively hub in the historic center of Rome. Best known for its morning market of flowers and vegetables which have replaced a former horse market. (I think the prices are great, especially considering the quality of the produce.) In the afternoon and evening, the vendors leave the square to the bars and restaurants. The piazza has a colorful history -- murders as well as executions. You'll find a statue in the piazza raised in memory of Giordano Bruno, a philosopher, who was burned at the stake in 1600 for "heresies" against the Catholic Church.

    It was also here that the painter Caravaggio supposedly killed a tennis-game opponent after an argument, leading to his four-year flight from Rome on murder charges.

    From here you should wander the wonderful small streets of the local neighborhood - it's the perfect area to get lost in and make your own discoveries.

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    Via Giulia

    by illumina Written May 25, 2006

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    Named for Pope Julius II (1503-13), this is one of the most picturesque hidden streets in Rome, just around the corner from Campo de' Fiori in the very heart of the historic centre. The road replaced a rabbit-warren of alleys in the 16th century, in a programme of urbanisation begun by the afore-mentioned Pope, and was designed to be Rome's most important thoroughfare, leading pilgrims towards St Peter's. It was the first street since ancient times to be laid out in a straight line. Bramante was supposed to design all the buildings, however this never came about, and a mixture of palaces line the street, now home to antique shops and restaurants.

    The Fontana del Mascherone – or fountain of the giant mask – dominates the southern end of the Via Giulia proper. Before Carlo Rainaldi’s fountain was built, this site was the ferry landing. He combined two ancient sculptures: a vast marble basin and a grotesque face with a vacuous expression. The mask dribbles water from the Acqua Paola, though for festivals it would pipe red wine. Sadly, this tradition has fallen by the wayside.

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  • Andraf's Profile Photo

    Campo dei Fiori

    by Andraf Updated May 20, 2006

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    Campo dei Fiori, Rome

    This square is home to a famous morning market. Each morning vendors fill the stalls to sell local produce like fruits and vegetables, cheese, spices, flowers etc. By afternoon the market dissapears. Around the square there are many restaurants and cafes. In the middle of the square is the statue of Giordano Bruno located on the spot where he was burned alive as a heretic by the Inquisition in 1600.

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  • jel118981's Profile Photo

    Campo dei Fiori

    by jel118981 Updated Apr 11, 2006

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    Flower stall
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    the name literally means "field of flowers", but this colourful market it's in the middle of downtown Rome, in Piazza Campo dei fiori. It's one of the oldest markets in Rome where romans go to buy food and flowers, is also a popular destination at night for locals and foreigners alike.

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    Flower & Vegetable Market

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 10, 2006

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    Campo Dei Fiore Flower & Vegetable Market

    We passed through this market several times during our stay. It was a colourful market, just like a farmer's market and operates Monday to Friday. We had lunch at one of the small restaurants on the side of the square, it was a good place to rest and watch the world go by.
    At night the square is very busy as it is lined with bars and trattorias.

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