Colosseum, Rome

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    by imeley
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  • Arizona_Girl's Profile Photo

    the Super Statium

    by Arizona_Girl Written May 19, 2011
    Outside
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    We're spoiled in our modern statiums. I can't even imagine how uncomfortable it would be to sit on those marble benches. I was amazed how how large it actually was in the inside, it looked so small from the outside. And what they talked about in history class finally made since with the boats and stuff.

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  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    Coloseum

    by msbrandysue Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    My actual picture :)
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    Oh, come on...I don't have to tell you to see the Coloseum. You know you have to!

    It is really neat to come around the corner and then all the sudden it's there. You start wiggling in your seats or jumping up and down. You've waited so long and here it is!

    Do be careful because some people have to wait a long while to get into the tours. Some people say they are not worth entering but I really wish I had. I love to see that sort of stuff. Some people things it's expensive. Ummm you're in Rome... splurge! If you pay over $1000 to get there with airfare why not spend $20 to go see the inside of one of the most famous ruins in the world?!? Also, don't forget to see my Coloseum Warnings!!

    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    While you are there don't forget to check out the Arch of Constantine right beside it. You can't get too close to it but you can definitely enjoy it.

    More info at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arch_of_Constantine

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    COLOSSEUM - COLOSSEO - COLLOSEUM

    by icunme Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Colosseo in early evening August 2006
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    It's true name is the "Anfiteatrum Flavium" (Flavian Amphitheater). However you choose to spell it, most people find it, rush to see it - this ancient Roman amphitheatre is, most often, the first destination for visitors. And, if you happen to be one of the few who choose not to visit Rome's icon, you would still be unable to avoid the sight of it. It is immense and has been called "Colosseo" due to its colossal proportions and proximity to the Colossus of Nero.

    The numbers: occupies 3,357 square meters - external ellipse 188 x 156 meters - 49 meters tall. Elliptical in shape: 187 meters at the long end and 155 meters at the short end.

    The material: Great variety - Travertine from the Tivoli area - Tufa, a soft volcanic rock - Concrete that you now see because the original marble facade was stripped - Bricks for the non-structural walls and screens - Marble for the facade, which was subsequently harvested for the construction of other Rome monuments and Basilicas.

    The history: A bloody history - built by Jewish prisoners - the primary site of carnage (both human and animal) through Roman gladiator "games." Construction began by Vespasian in 72 A.D. - completed in 80 A.D. by his son, Titus.

    The Rome Pass gets you into 2 Museums, including the Colosseo if you choose, without waiting in lines + 3 days free transportation - or, you can pay a Colloseum tour guide double the 11€ entrance price just for the Coliseum (more than the 18 € cost of the Rome Pass) and hear its history which is nice also - I took the Rome Pass and bought a book with a neat overlay depicting the ancient history. It opens at 8:30 a.m. - closing time varies. Official website below.

    Ancient Romans cultivated the war-like spirit here that drove them to conquer the world in their era. Their bloody games ended at the beginning of the 5th Century when the monk, Telemachus, entered the arena to put himself between gladiators. He was martyred there but the games did come to an end.
    PHOTOS - Colloseum in different light

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  • Lacristina's Profile Photo

    Avoiding the Long Lines at the Coliseum

    by Lacristina Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Il Colosseo alla notte (The Coliseum at night)

    Il Colosseo! Everything glorious, and many things despicable, about the Roman culture of 2000 years ago can be found in its history. What an astounding pummeling of feelings hit me the first time I saw it.

    But first, how to avoid the lines.

    1. Buy your ticket at the Palatine Hill entrance. A ticket allows you entrance to both the Palatine Hill and the Colosseum. The entrance to the Palatine is only about 200 meters southwest of the Coliseum. Just follow the path, around the Arch of Constantine, buy your ticket there. Then walk back, past the line at the entrance (the line should form on the right, but often snakes over to the left). Walk up to the turnstiles, place your ticket in the slot, and voila, you're in!

    2. There are actually 2 lines at the Coliseum - one for tickets, one for tickets plus audio guide (an extra 4 euros). The audio guide line is always much shorter.

    3. Buy the Rome Archeologia Card which costs 20 euros and will gain you entrance to a number of archeological sites including the Coliseum, Palatine Hill, Baths of Caracalla, the National Museum of Rome, etc. You can buy this ticket at any of these sites all of which have a shorter line (most likely, no line) than the Coliseum, then just bypass the line as above. It's valid for 7 days.

    4. Make a reservation by phone: 39 06 3996 7700. But I would wait to see what the weather is like. There is a special ticket window to pick up your reserved ticket, so again, no waiting in line.

    5. Make a reservation on the internet. (read the fine print): http://www.pierreci.it/do/show/list/20

    6. Take a commercial tour. There are a some cheesy "guides" hawking tours outside the Coliseum. Better to go with a reputable company.

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  • cheekymarieh's Profile Photo

    The Colosseum

    by cheekymarieh Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Colossus Colosseum

    Imagine the days of gladitorial fighting with the Christians thrown amongst the lions. If you've seen the film Gladiator, you can imagine the occurrences within the arena. The name came from its 'colossal' size. It's construction commenced in AD 72 under the supervison of the Emperor Vespasian. It's location was on the site excavated by Nero for a lake for his gardens.

    It is constructed from travertine which came from the quarries of Tivoli. A road was built especially for the transportation of the blocks. The inspiration for the design came from the Teatro di Marcello. The columns in the lower levels are of Doric design and further up you find Ionic and Corinthian columns.

    It had a capacity of around 50,000. The design of the arena at the bottom of the built up seats is still followed by many sports arenas these days (such as the Olympic Stadium ... though I am sure the Colosseum is cleaner to sit in!)

    Entry: €8 and includes entrance to the Palatine. Ticket office closes 1 hour before closing time.

    Open: Every day from 9am. Winter closing: 4.30pm, Summer closing: 7.30pm.

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  • TRimer's Profile Photo

    Colosseum

    by TRimer Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Colosseum

    An architectual and engineering marvel, the Colosseum's arena has been the model for stadiums ever since. The name Coliseum probably comes from the big bronze statue of about 38 metres, known as the "Colosso" (giant), that Nerone wanted built on his image in the Domus Aurea.

    The Colosseum (which is also referred to as the Flavian Amphitheater) was begun by Emperor Vespasian, inaugurated by his son Tito in 80 A.D. and completed by Domitian. Located on marshy land between the Esquiline and Caelian Hills, it was the first permanent amphitheater to be built in Rome.

    The Colosseum was designed to hold 50,000 spectators, and it had approximately eighty entrances so crowds could arrive and leave easily and quickly. It was designed with four storeys. The upper storey contained seating for lower classes and women. The lowest storey was preserved for prominent citizens. Below the ground were rooms and cages containing wild animals and mechanical devices. The cages could be hoisted, enabling the animals to appear in the middle of the arena.

    Emperors used the Colosseum to entertain the public with free games. Those games were a symbol of prestige and power and they were a way for an emperor to increase his popularity.

    Open Hours
    9a-7:30p end Mar-end Aug, 9a-7p Sep, 9a-6:30p Oct, 9a-4:30p end Oct-mid Feb, 9a-5p mid Feb-end Mar

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Colosseo

    by mindcrime Written Mar 20, 2011

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    Colosseum by night
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    Colosseum is an absolute must see, a true icon of Rome which looks even more impressive during the night (pic 1) when the lighted Colosseum looks beautiful no matter that it was used as a venue of brutality.

    It’s a big elliptical amphitheatre located east of the Roman Forum. It was completed in 80AD after 10 years of construction and had a capacity of about 50,000 people. Of course the history of this huge structure is much more interesting than the building itself (which stays partially ruined in case you don’t know) because thousands of people and animals died during “sport games” of gladiator battles, lion or other animal hunts (guess who was the winner against the lions, panthers and tigers), executions (the fight against a lion of an unarmed man was an execution too but more impressive for the spectators that were thirsty for blood) and other events like theatrical plays!

    You can take pictures from many different angles(pics 3-4) but don’t forget to walk in the corridors too (pic 5), the only way to be protected from the sun.

    Outside the Colosseum people wearing gladiator costumes will pose with a picture with you if you give some euro but better save your money and get inside and admire the site.

    It is open daily from 8.30 and the entrance fee is €12

    The ticket is valid for Colosseo+Mostra+Palatino+Forum. There’s usually a long line waiting for a ticket at Colosseum but if you use the other entrances you’ll buy your ticket quickly. If you want to see only Colosseum the only way to skip the line is to book online or buy the Roma Pass or go with a guided group.

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  • travelgourmet's Profile Photo

    NO DOME, BUT SUPER

    by travelgourmet Updated Feb 18, 2011

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    The beauty of Rome's Colosseo

    The Colosseo of Rome is magnificent to see. The size is larger in person than the pictures that show off the curves of the stadium. I know that there are a lot of pics and comments on the Colosseo on VT, but first time tourists should know that the best way to get there is the 110 open trambus.

    The 110 Open Bus stops right in front of the Colosseo and you can get off, explore the ruins and get back on the 110 later. Twelve stops in all on the 110 gets you to all the major attractions of Rome.

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  • babaobah's Profile Photo

    place where lots of people died

    by babaobah Written Dec 3, 2010

    Colosseum is the place where the Roman kings bring the slaves and their prisoners to fight to death this place is full of blood and toutoure souls and tourist visiting it for what? even the walls are very old and painted with the blood of poor people this place is abig sham for these
    Abbey

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  • imeley's Profile Photo

    The Colosseum

    by imeley Updated Oct 3, 2010

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    The Colloseum is an ampitheater in the center of the city of Rome, the largest ever built in the Roman Empire. It was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such mock sea battles, animal hunts executions. The Colloseum is today one of Rome's popular tourist attractions, receiving millions of visitors annually. A major restoration programme was carried out between 1993 and 2000 at a cost of 40 billion Italian lire.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    An imposing structure

    by viddra Updated Aug 10, 2010

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    the colosseum
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    This is where once gladiators fought among themselves or wild beasts to entertain the crowds. Fortunately, such a brutality stopped in the 15th century.

    The huge amphitheatre was built on the site of an artificial lake in 72 AD and took 10 years to be completed. It got its name after the nearby giant statue of Nero.

    Although it's in ruins, the Colosseum's still fascinating, with a rich history behind it.

    Open daily from 9am-1 hour before sunset;

    admission fee (entrance to Palatine Hill included)

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  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Coloseo

    by June.b Updated Jun 23, 2010

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    The very first sight I really want to see, so I put down my luggage upon checking at the hotel when arrived in Rome in the afternoon and took the metro to Coloseo station. Emerging out of the station the huge colosseum in front of me gave me a sudden feeling of disappointment - or maybe my excitement was slayed due to the miserable condition of my hotel room, at least compared to all the places I've stayed at during the whole trip around europe. So the misery killed all my perceptions.

    It's not the same feeling I had when I first saw the Eiffel tower in Paris or the Roman Theater in Ephesus. Or maybe because I expected too much from the images I have in mind and the postcards and movies.

    Anyhoo, the coloseo is a landmark and an icon. Massive structure surrounded by the traffic of Rome and all the usual tourism activities around the area. I never bother to enter and since I've met some people right there and then, we started exploring the area. I realized tho, maybe it looks better at night, or when my mind is clear - because I started to love Rome after a couple of hours. Or I should have gotten inside. I forgot to come back for it though.

    So don't get me wrong - it's me, it's not the coloseo - after all it's one of the greatest architectural and engineering work of the Romans.

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    Roma Pass lets you jump the line

    by milliturtle Updated Jun 9, 2010

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    I've seen the outside of the Colosseum a few years ago, so this time, my friends and I decided to actually go inside. Armed with the Roma Pass, which includes a 3 day transport pass and admission to 2 of the sites on the list, we hopped onto the metro to get to the Colosseo station. The station is just around the corner from the actual site.

    We found out pretty quickly that Roma Pass holders have a special line to enter the site, so we zipped inside in about 5 minutes, mainly because it takes about 3 minutes to walk from the entrance to the Roma Pass scanners. The Roma Pass line is right next to the Group ticket line. As far as we can tell, the line for buying tickets barely bulged during this time. The pass does not include the audio guide rental though.

    The interior of the Colosseum is interesting, but as we did not have any audio guide (or guidebooks), we were not able to appreciate the architecture as much. Since we got to the site at around 11am or so, the site was quite crowded, so it actually took a while for us to circle the upper level of the Colosseum. Then we had trouble finding the stairs that will take you to the bottom tier to take a closer look at the area that was under the stage. It was rather hot at that time, so bring lots of water. We ended up staying about 1.5 hours, although much of it was spent just trying to get around the place than actually "sightseeing".

    Since my group has only a passing interest in architecture and the fact that we got off the plane about 3 hours before, the 1.5 hour visit was not as enjoyable as we'd initially hoped. (That's not to say the site itself wasn't interesting, we just weren't in the right frame of mind to appreciate it.) Oh, the guys in Roman Gladiator costumes are very aggressive, so beware when you try to take pictures of them.

    If you want an unobstructed view of the Colosseum, make sure you visit the much less crowded (and more tree-lined) Palatine Hills. We were able to take crazy pictures with the Colosseum in the background for 5 to 10 minutes before people even noticed us.

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  • Stay away from Roman Gladiators Hawking Photos

    by susanf1 Written Apr 25, 2010

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    I don't recommend taking photos with the guys dressed as Roman gladiators outside the colleseum. The gladiators hawking photos are rude. One "gladiator" tried to get 10 euro out of me for taking a photo with MY camera. I told him I'd give him 2 euro, more than the 1 euro I thought he deserved, and he started making rude comments about Americans; in front of children none the less. Stay away!! They are worse than the Romany pick pockets that used to be ubiquitous in Rome (no longer due to an unfortunate "clean up"). The colleseum itself is not to be missed.

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  • No Rome trip is complete without....

    by kjburden Written Apr 14, 2010

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    The Colisseum is a place I have wanted to see since I learned about it in elementary school. Who knew it'd be a dream come true? My husband and I visited in early December 2009. At this time, it was chilly but the amount of tourists was miniscule which made the cold worth it. We hopped on the bus and took in all the sights around us. I looked up and saw the Colisseum in the distance and it took my breath away. We immediately got off the bus (don't know why we didn't ride all the way there!) and walked toward it. It amazed me seeing this ancient structure surrounded by busy roads, people rushing around and all the noise. It seemed so out of place, but was still beautiful. Along the route we saw ancient ruins that somehow survived the building of roads and modern buildings. It makes you wonder why these fallen columns and stones weren't removed to put in a new restaurant or apartment building. We arrived too late to get inside the Colisseum, but walked all around it taking pictures. There were vendors there selling little trinkets and souvenirs and snacks, but they were easy to ignore. It was also easy to avoid the "gladiators" who roamed around the grounds. We planned to visit again the following day before our departure from Rome, but it was raining rather hard so we decided not to. Just another reason to plan a trip back!

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