Colosseum, Rome

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  • Hildeal's Profile Photo

    Colosseum

    by Hildeal Written Oct 5, 2012

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    Colosseum means colossal and huge. Originally it was called the Flavian Amphitheatre and it was the biggest . Amphitheatre in the Roman Empire. It has been there for 2000 years, through earthquake, looting, pollution and all the vibrations from the heavy Italian traffic. So the designers must have done a hell of good groundwork!

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    Il Colosseo, Rome’s Face to the World

    by von.otter Written Sep 3, 2012

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    “In Rome, the emperor sat in a special part of the Coliseum called the Caesarian Section.”
    — George Carlin (1937-2008)

    Properly known as the Amphitheatrum Flavium (Flavian Amphitheatre), this arena, which could seat 50,000 spectators, did not come to be called the Colosseum because of its size, 1,640 feet in circumference. The reason for the popular name is not because it was big, which it is, but because of the gold-plated colossal sculpture, on longer exiting, that once stood beside it.

    Colossus Neronis was 98-foot tall bronze likeness of Emperor Nero (37–68 AD). He had it erected in the vestibule of his imperial villa, known as the Domus Aurea. After Nero’s death, it was refashioned into the sun god, Sol Invictus, and moved next to the Flavian Amphitheatre.

    Emperor Vespasian began building the Colosseum in AD 72 on the site of a newly drained lake in the grounds of Nero’s Domus Aurea. The greatest amphitheatre the Romans built it is the most recognized landmark of the Eternal City.

    The web site listed, though not the official one, is a valuable resource for factual and visitor’s information.

    Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007 Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007 Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007 Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007 Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007
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    Colosseum

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 30, 2012

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    We started to explore Rome from The Colosseum, or the Flavian Amphitheatre. It is an elliptical amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome and the largest ever built in the Roman Empire. It is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering.

    You can watch my 2 min 15 sec Video Rome Colosseum out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Colosseum admission fee:
    Full ticket - €15.50
    EU reduced ticket - €10.50 (available only for European citizens aged between 18 and 25)
    EU complimentary ticket- €4.50 (available only for EU citizens aged above 65 and under 18)
    Opening hours:
    Mid February - mid March: 9 AM - 4.30 PM
    Mid March - end March: 9 AM - 5.00 PM
    End March - end August: 9 AM - 7.00 PM
    End August - end Sept.: 9 AM - 6.30 PM
    End Sept. - end October: 9 AM - 6.00 PM
    End October - mid March: 9 AM - 4.00 PM

    Colosseum
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  • dila's Profile Photo

    Colosseo

    by dila Written May 30, 2012

    used Archeologia Card so almost no waiting.Just show card and they tell were to walk.
    Try to get a map it is a audioguide map but makes it a lot easier.
    I also bought a book in the shop here Rome Virtual reconstruction of sites and monuments.
    If you like the old sites maybe you can buy it before you start.
    opening times every day 9.00 - 19.00
    closed january 1st december 25th

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  • fabric_letters's Profile Photo

    When in Rome...Its a must!

    by fabric_letters Written May 27, 2012

    Top of everyones list whilst visiting Italy is the Colosseum and although it was more than impressive with it’s incredible history, and its ability to stand tall century after century, I left feeling dissappointed.

    What was once a tremendous building that was used for all kinds of entertainment is slowing turning to a ruin from earthquakes and people who discreetly chip away at the stone and sell it.
    Although there is an clear sign of restoration work being done, the background of a busy metropolitan city kinda ruined the historical experiance for me.

    Either way, its a piece of architecture that simply cannot be missed, or even avoided due to its large size!

    I would allow a full morning or afternoon to see it fully.

    Inside the Colosseum
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    Classical memories

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 28, 2012

    Imagine yourself back in ancient Rome. The solid walls of the Colosseum surround you and the heavy weight of the stone arches and the tiers of seats above you, pressing down. It's one thing to look at the diagrams, see the way that they make it stand, yet another to stand under the arches and feel the weight held above you and it's been standing for over 2,000 years.

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  • Ines_'s Profile Photo

    Colosseo

    by Ines_ Written Mar 18, 2012

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    Rome's Colosseum was built as an amphitheatre built for gladiator shows and other events. It was built from 70 AD to 96 AD and it is the largest colloseum made by Romans.

    Today, it’s a symbol of Rome and it was voted one of the new seven world wonders.
    It survived until today and it was said “While stands the Coliseum, Rome shall stand; / When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall; / And when Rome falls - the World.”

    The tickets are 12€ and include Roman Forum, Colloseum and Palatine Hill. The queue at Roman Forum it’s quite smaller than the one of Colloseum, so if you also want to go there buy the tickets at Roman Forum or Palatine Hill.

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    Colosseum, Rome, Italy ...

    by TrendsetterME Updated Feb 23, 2012

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    The Colosseum, or the Coliseum, originally the Flavian Amphitheatre is an elliptical amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, the largest ever built in the Roman Empire. It is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering.

    Occupying a site just east of the Roman Forum, its construction started in 72 AD under the emperor Vespasian and was completed in 80 AD under Titus with further modifications being made during Domitian's reign. The name "Amphitheatrum Flavium" derives from both Vespasian's and Titus's family name. Capable of seating 50,000 spectators the Colosseum was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Classical mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, a quarry, and a Christian shrine.

    The Colosseum today is now a major tourist attraction in Rome with thousands of tourists each year paying to view the interior arena, though entrance for EU citizens is partially subsidised, and under-18 and over 65 EU citizens entrances are free. There is now a museum dedicated to Eros located in the upper floor of the outer wall of the building. Part of the arena floor has been re-floored. Beneath the Colosseum, a network of subterranean passageways once used to transport wild animals and gladiators to the arena opened to the public in summer 2010. The Colosseum is also the site of Roman Catholic ceremonies in the 20th and 21st centuries. For instance, Pope Benedict XVI leads the Stations of the Cross called the Scriptural Way of the Cross at the Colosseum on Good Fridays.

    Colosseum, Rome, Italy Colosseum, Rome, Italy Colosseum, Rome, Italy Colosseum, Rome, Italy Colosseum, Rome, Italy
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    Only in my wildest dreams

    by EuroJ Written Jan 26, 2012

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    When visiting Rome its a must to go to the Colosseum. I can recall many times seeing it on tv and always saying it would be so cool to go and actually be there and touch it. Im somewhat of a history junkie & this is what history is all about so when I was able to actually go and see it with my own eyes & touch it I was on top of the world.

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Colosseo!

    by zadunajska8 Written Nov 6, 2011

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    As the popular name suggests this is colossal! Of course, the real name of the place is the Flavian Amphitheatre and the term Colosseum or Colosseo actually came from the massive statue of Nero which used to be beside the amphitheatre - but it's one of those happy coincidences of history I guess that the name "Colosseo" fits the building too.

    The setting isn't the greatest with busy roads roaring around the place but once your inside they won't bother you. Getting inside is the challenge.

    You can buy a joint ticket for the Colosseum, Roman Forum and Palatine Hill. I would strongly suggest going early to the Forum and buying the ticket there and visiting the Colosseum later in the day. If you get to teh Forum early enough there is no queue there whilst there were queues outside the colosseum long before it opened.

    Once armed with your ticket from the Forum you then have to negotiate the entrance. There are 3 seperate lines at the entrance. The one to the right is for people with no ticket and goes back for what seems like eternity. The one on the left is for organised tour groups who are prebooked. The one in the middle is for individual visitors who already have tickets - this is where you want to be. There is of course a further complication - the tour groups try to congregate at the entrance to this middle line and so you have to time it just right to dash between groups to get to the barriers. You can't get past them whilst they are there they are too big and crowded together - trust me, we did try several times. Just wait for that gap between 2 groups and go for it! Once you've reached that barrier it's plain sailing and you'll be inside within a minute.

    When you emerge into the interior of the Colosseum you will finally appreciate the awesome size of this building. It really isn't evident from outside. Take your time to wander round. Take some good photos - you'll want to remember this in years to come. You might have to wait to get to the best places to get the best photos as it can be very busy.

    The Colosseum Colosseo! Colosseo! Colosseo! Colosseo!
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    3D Rewind

    by Arizona_Girl Written May 19, 2011

    Right by the Colosseum. Our tour group took us there as the last part of our tour of the ancient forum and such. It was part of our tour ticket price. It was air conditioned, a little corny but all in all fun, there was nothing that would be inappropriate for children, they do not recommend taking children under 5. I would think it because their sound track gets really loud at brief moments. Nice place to rest on a tiring day of walking about.

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    the Super Statium

    by Arizona_Girl Written May 19, 2011

    We're spoiled in our modern statiums. I can't even imagine how uncomfortable it would be to sit on those marble benches. I was amazed how how large it actually was in the inside, it looked so small from the outside. And what they talked about in history class finally made since with the boats and stuff.

    Outside reconstructed floor So tall inside
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  • msbrandysue's Profile Photo

    Coloseum

    by msbrandysue Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Oh, come on...I don't have to tell you to see the Coloseum. You know you have to!

    It is really neat to come around the corner and then all the sudden it's there. You start wiggling in your seats or jumping up and down. You've waited so long and here it is!

    Do be careful because some people have to wait a long while to get into the tours. Some people say they are not worth entering but I really wish I had. I love to see that sort of stuff. Some people things it's expensive. Ummm you're in Rome... splurge! If you pay over $1000 to get there with airfare why not spend $20 to go see the inside of one of the most famous ruins in the world?!? Also, don't forget to see my Coloseum Warnings!!

    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    While you are there don't forget to check out the Arch of Constantine right beside it. You can't get too close to it but you can definitely enjoy it.

    More info at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arch_of_Constantine

    My actual picture :) From the gate with zoom on my cam Arch of Constantine
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  • icunme's Profile Photo

    COLOSSEUM - COLOSSEO - COLLOSEUM

    by icunme Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    It's true name is the "Anfiteatrum Flavium" (Flavian Amphitheater). However you choose to spell it, most people find it, rush to see it - this ancient Roman amphitheatre is, most often, the first destination for visitors. And, if you happen to be one of the few who choose not to visit Rome's icon, you would still be unable to avoid the sight of it. It is immense and has been called "Colosseo" due to its colossal proportions and proximity to the Colossus of Nero.

    The numbers: occupies 3,357 square meters - external ellipse 188 x 156 meters - 49 meters tall. Elliptical in shape: 187 meters at the long end and 155 meters at the short end.

    The material: Great variety - Travertine from the Tivoli area - Tufa, a soft volcanic rock - Concrete that you now see because the original marble facade was stripped - Bricks for the non-structural walls and screens - Marble for the facade, which was subsequently harvested for the construction of other Rome monuments and Basilicas.

    The history: A bloody history - built by Jewish prisoners - the primary site of carnage (both human and animal) through Roman gladiator "games." Construction began by Vespasian in 72 A.D. - completed in 80 A.D. by his son, Titus.

    The Rome Pass gets you into 2 Museums, including the Colosseo if you choose, without waiting in lines + 3 days free transportation - or, you can pay a Colloseum tour guide double the 11€ entrance price just for the Coliseum (more than the 18 € cost of the Rome Pass) and hear its history which is nice also - I took the Rome Pass and bought a book with a neat overlay depicting the ancient history. It opens at 8:30 a.m. - closing time varies. Official website below.

    Ancient Romans cultivated the war-like spirit here that drove them to conquer the world in their era. Their bloody games ended at the beginning of the 5th Century when the monk, Telemachus, entered the arena to put himself between gladiators. He was martyred there but the games did come to an end.
    PHOTOS - Colloseum in different light

    Colosseo in early evening August 2006 Colosseo Colosseo and Arch of Constantine
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    Avoiding the Long Lines at the Coliseum

    by Lacristina Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Il Colosseo! Everything glorious, and many things despicable, about the Roman culture of 2000 years ago can be found in its history. What an astounding pummeling of feelings hit me the first time I saw it.

    But first, how to avoid the lines.

    1. Buy your ticket at the Palatine Hill entrance. A ticket allows you entrance to both the Palatine Hill and the Colosseum. The entrance to the Palatine is only about 200 meters southwest of the Coliseum. Just follow the path, around the Arch of Constantine, buy your ticket there. Then walk back, past the line at the entrance (the line should form on the right, but often snakes over to the left). Walk up to the turnstiles, place your ticket in the slot, and voila, you're in!

    2. There are actually 2 lines at the Coliseum - one for tickets, one for tickets plus audio guide (an extra 4 euros). The audio guide line is always much shorter.

    3. Buy the Rome Archeologia Card which costs 20 euros and will gain you entrance to a number of archeological sites including the Coliseum, Palatine Hill, Baths of Caracalla, the National Museum of Rome, etc. You can buy this ticket at any of these sites all of which have a shorter line (most likely, no line) than the Coliseum, then just bypass the line as above. It's valid for 7 days.

    4. Make a reservation by phone: 39 06 3996 7700. But I would wait to see what the weather is like. There is a special ticket window to pick up your reserved ticket, so again, no waiting in line.

    5. Make a reservation on the internet. (read the fine print): http://www.pierreci.it/do/show/list/20

    6. Take a commercial tour. There are a some cheesy "guides" hawking tours outside the Coliseum. Better to go with a reputable company.

    Il Colosseo alla notte (The Coliseum at night)

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Comments (2)

  • goodfish's Profile Photo
    Jan 19, 2015 at 4:02 AM

    1/19/2012 Update to my post below regarding bags at the Colosseum, Palatine and Forum:
    According to latest info from a credible walking-tour company, no backpacks or large handbags are allowed in the Colosseum, Palatine or Forum, and there are no facilities at those sites for checking them. As there are no formal guidelines for what "large" is, assume the smaller, the better.

  • goodfish's Profile Photo
    Jan 16, 2015 at 11:47 AM

    1/16/2015: There appears to be a recent tightening of security at the Colosseum, Palatine and Forum. From the http://www.coopculture.it website for these three attractions:

    "ATTENTION PLEASE! We inform visitors that inside the monument it is strictly forbidden to enter with backpacks, handbags and luggage. "

    As there is no baggage check facilities at these attractions, it looks like you're going to have to visit these sites only with what can be carried in your pockets. I'll update this notice if newer information proves otherwise.

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