Colosseum, Rome

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  • Colosseum
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    you need to see it once Colosseum

    by gwened Written Aug 25, 2013

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    This is a huge building so old and still standing almost complete its amazing. The history is awesome, and part of many school books. To see it in front is a great feeling;even if have seen it before ,coming with the family was a great experience.

    However, its old ruins, nothing much to see and the price of admission is high in my opinion. So if heard about it, read about it, saw it on tv, you must come to see it once, afterward do not think so.

    a bit of history
    Located in the archaeological heart of the city of Rome, the Flavian Amphitheatre, or, more commonly, the Colosseum, stands for monumentality and receives daily a large number of visitors attracted by the enchantment of its history and its complex architecture. Built in the first century CE at the behest of the emperors of the Flavian dynasty, the Colosseum, named after a colossal statue that stood nearby, until the end of the Ancient Age accommodated games of great popular appeal, such as hunts and gladiatorial fights. The building was, and still is today, a show in itself. In fact, it is the largest amphitheatre not only in the city of Rome but in the world, able to offer stunning sceneries as well as services for spectators.

    admission is 12€ per adult, and opening hours schedules are • october to february 15
    8.30 - 16.30
    16 February to 15 March: 8.30 - 17.00
    16 March to last Saturday of March: 8.30 - 17.30
    Last Sunday of March to 31 August: 8.30 - 19.15
    1 September to 30 September: 8.30 - 19.00
    1 October to last Sunday of October: 8.30 - 18.30

    enjoy the gladiators.

    via di san gregorio colosseum chapel entrance to colosseum side entrance to the colosseum from domus aurea the colosseum via fiori imperiali the colosseum
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  • Skip the line and see more than just the Colosseum

    by Lolatraveller Written Jun 18, 2013

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    When most people think of Italy, the Colosseum is one of the first images to come to mind (or pasta or a Ferrari). It's no wonder that the line outside is inhumanely long. It was a must-see sight for me as well, but after some digging online, I found an easy way to skip the line while also getting a broader view of ancient Rome. A 5 minute walk from the Colosseum is the entrance to Palatine Hill, where you can get a combo pass for the Hill and the Colosseum, allowing you to skip the line for a much cheaper (and probably more legitimate way) than the scalpers. We were lucky because when we arrived at the ticket office, there was a small line, but we were even able to skip that by asking to take the last English tour (which was actually only at 1pm). Palatine Hill is a collection of ruins of Roman palaces and buildings, and luckily the tour guide had posters of recreations of what the rooms would have looked like in their hayday. This really brought the stones to life, so I would really recommend getting the tour. We didn't get one for the Colosseum since we knew some history already, but it may have also been a good idea.

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    The Colloseum

    by GentleSpirit Updated May 16, 2013

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    There is probably no edifice more symbolic of Rome than the Colosseum. An engineering marvel in a culture that was routinely outstanding in works of great civil engineering.

    The Colloseum, also known as the Flavian amphitheater, was started under Vespasian in 72AD and was finished 8 years later under his son, Titus. It was the largest amphitheater built by the Romans. In its heyday, it was used for gladiatorial contests and similar spectacles. What these spectacles amounted to really were entertainment for the masses, allowing the ruling classes to strengthen their position in society by distracting the masses from more immediate concerns. Putting on gladiatorial contests was by no means cheap, and over time their provision became associated with political corruption. Starting with Augustus, the games were publicly financed as a matter of public interest.

    Remember, of course, that the gladiators, though they had something similar to rock star status in some quarters, were slaves for the most part. They were taught to fight to the death against other gladiators, against wild beasts, against criminals. The gladiators came from lower social classes and generally fought in one to three contests a year. The spectators came into play in deciding the life or death of the combatants in case of a tie.

    With the rule of Constantine and the coming of Christianity the gladiatorial contests started to change. First it became common that they were no longer fought to the death. Gradually, the gladiatorial competition was outlawed as pagan. By 435 AD gladiatorial fights were no longer mentioned.

    The Colosseum, damaged by earthquakes and fires, ceased to serve much of a purpose with the decline of gladiatorial contests and the games. In the Middle Ages it served as a cemetery. It appears as a ruin today because over time so much of its stone was pilfered for use in other statues, palaces and monuments.

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    Wow, Wow, Wow!!!

    by clareabee Written Feb 10, 2013

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    For me the Colloeseum is the most iconic landmark in Rome, and the place i immediately associated with the city even before I visited.
    I would advise booking your tickets online. The queues were not too bad when we visited in February but I can imagine in peak season it would be manic!!! It is really easy and you just print them off and bring with you. Tickets are valid for 2 days and allows access to the Forum (which is a much bigger site and requires a half day visit).
    We got the audioguide which cost 11 Euros - being totally honest it was a complete waste of money, and I didn't like the fact i had to leave my drivers license with them (or other form of ID) until a returned the guide. The guide only had about 6 points, they were not clearly marked and to be honest the majority didn't give that much information and most of it i had picked up in a guidebook (The eyewitness ones are excellent) - so I wouldn't bother again. You can hire a guide but personally i prefer to explore somewhere at my own pace.
    It is a very interesting structure explore and interesting that all residents in Rome had a free of charge seat at the Colloseum to watch the games - the higher up you were the less important you were. The important people had front row seats. The emporers had their names enscribed on their seats. You can see all underground tunnels where the animals/gladiators would have been and some of the staircases in the arena are still visible (although they are very steep!)
    You get a lot of guides offering to take you round - and a LOT of men in Gladiator costumes touting for business (photo's) although i am not sure that the romans would have worn socks under their sandals ;-)

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    Coliseum

    by Aitana Written Feb 9, 2013

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    In my opinion the visit to the Coliseum is a must when one is in Rome. Awfully it is always very crowded and the queue to buy the ticket is too long any time. It is advisable to buy the combined ticket in the Palatine Hill where the queues are usually shorter.
    The Coliseum started to be built in 72 AD and was inaugurated in 80 AD. It used to be venue for fights of gladiators, spectacles with fierce animals, sea battles, animal hunts and other spectacles. The coliseum had capacity for 50,000 people. There are over 80 arches through which spectators entered, so that they were accommodated or evacuated very quickly.
    The visitor can walk through tunnels, a part of the arena, and the galleries.

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  • Puckfair's Profile Photo

    Allow plenty of time for the Colosseum

    by Puckfair Updated Feb 3, 2013

    There is no review that can encompass the sheer size of this place.

    We allowed a day for this and included the Roman Forum as well. We bought our tickets at the entrance to the Forum and in the afternoon did the Colosseum. We felt drawn back to Colosseum again the next day .

    It is crowded but its expected .
    All you do when you enter here is imagine the crowds in the past and what they "saw" .For a partial ruin it is amazing .
    It is typical of Rome though the cars and the noisy road right by . I wonder though how the environment is causing problems with this vast structure and it is a beauty that should be given ample time to enjoy .

    The gladiators are there but they were not pushy ,some other reviews made them sound complete oafs ,I guess its their job to try and get as much money for the picture.

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    The Colloseum

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 5, 2013

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    We intended to visited the colloseum. 12 Euros entrance fee which includes the forum and Palatine Hill, but the queues were so long we did not bother. Probably pre-booking on line is your best bet for a visit. Instead of visiting we walked all the way round the outside admiring it from different angles. It looks different from different sides. It is also illuminated at night. It is possible to see the colloseum and forum well without going in. We also walked up the free road on the Palatine Hill but while this gives you good views over the forum, you can see next to nothing of the Palatine Hill remains. Our best view of them came from the Circe Maximus.

    We had read in advance that it was OK to get tickets for the colloseum, forum and Palatine from the Palatine entrance. However, at Christmas there were hundreds of people there, too.

    The colleseum. The colleseum. The colleseum. The colleseum.
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    18-Blood-drenched Arena - The Colosseum

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Dec 12, 2012

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    1. Construction: Emperor Vespasian, founder of the Flavian Dynasty, started its construction in 72 AD. His son, Emperor Titus, completed it in 80 AD with improvements by Emperor Domitian, Vespasian's younger son, who also constructed the hypogeum (meaning 'underground'), a number of underground tunnels for housing animals and slaves. Built of concrete and stone, it is considered to be one of the greatest works of Roman ingenuity, Roman architecture and Roman engineering skill. It was easily the most impressive building of the Roman Empire and the largest building of that era.

    2. Original Name: Originally known as the Flavian Amphitheater. The nearby Colossus statue of Emperor Nero, now no longer visible, gave the building its name.

    3. Site: Built on the site of an artificial lake, part of Emperor Nero's huge park in the center of Rome.

    4. Current position: The southern side of the Colosseum collapsed during an earthquake in 847. Parts of the building were used for the construction of later monuments, including St. Peter's Basilica. Though in ruins today, it retains its majesty and is a beautiful sight, especially at night when the lights are used to telling effect.

    5. Specifications: The elliptical building measures 616 ft (188 m) by 511 ft (156 m) and is more than 160 ft (48 m) in height. In its heydays, its elliptical design could accommodate some 50,000 spectators who entered and exited through 80 entrances for speedy assembly and dispersal. There are 4 storeys above the ground, with sitting arrangements according to social standing, the poorest occupying the top-most storey.

    The names of some 5th century senators are carved into the stonework, possibly reserving the area for their use. Rooms below the ground were for cages containing wild animals which could be hoisted directly to the middle of the arena. To protect spectators from the harsh rays of the sun, a huge valarium or awning was used. The seats were inclined in such a way that the angle afforded everyone a perfect view of the arena.

    6. Use: For entertaining the public with free games which were a symbol of power and prestige and indirectly, to increase the popularity of the Emperor as well as distract the people from political processes or the humdrum activity of life. Gladiators fights were the most sought-after events, the fighters usually condemned criminals or prisoners of war or slaves. Sometimes these gladiators were pitted against wild animals. It is reported a 100-days' games was held by Titus for the inauguration of the building, with some 9,000 wild animals taking part. It is recorded that as gladiators fought, the spectators reviled them with cries and curses egging them on, much like the wrestling bouts and the boxing events that mark present day man-to-man sports. One contest followed another throughout the day and if the ground became too blood-soaked, it was quickly covered over with a fresh layer of sand and the show went on. (herena=sand'; modern-day 'arena').

    The gladiators entered the packed arena to the accompaniment of trumpets from an underground passage that linked their barrack to the arena. One round of the arena and then they paid homage to the Emperor with the words, "Ave Cesare morituri te salutant" or "Hail Caesar, those who are about to die salute you".

    It is not true that the Colosseum was used to kill Christians as a kind of spectacle.

    7. Its Decline: With the decline of the Roman Empire in the 6th. century, the Colosseum fell into disuse. Threatened with demolition by Pope Sixtus V, Pope Benedict XIV declared it a sacred monument by the simple expedient of placing a cross on a pedestal at the Colosseum and dedicating the site to the Passion of Christ as a symbol of the sufferings of all Christian martyrs. On Good Friday, this cross is the starting point for the Way of the Cross procession. Subsequent Popes restored and consolidated the building.

    8. Cannibilisation: Almost the entire outer surrounding brick wall is gone. During the Middle Ages, the marble, lead and iron was used to build Barberini Palace, Piazza Venezia and even St. Peter's. The holes seen in many columns are the places from where the lead and iron were extracted. These had been used by the ancient Romans to hold the marble blocks together.

    9. Attractions Close by: Arch of Constantine; Arch of Titus; Arch of Septimius Severus; Capitoline Hill; Circus Maximus; Imperial Forum; Roman Forum; Palatine Hill; Trajan's Markets.

    10. Other Trivia:

    The Colosseum was built in 10 years flat. Considering its size this is no mean feat; it is remarkable.

    The steps are 10 inches high. While climbing up, your knee almost touches your chin. It is quite an effort to reach the upper levels.

    The Colosseum served as an entertainment centre for Roman citizens for almost 450 years. One can well imagine the amount of blood of man and beast that has seeped through the arena.

    The Colosseum is depicted on the Italian version of the five-cent euro coin.

    The audience went to their seats and exited the arena via the 80-odd vomitoria passages quickly. The term, 'vomitoria' is derived from the Latin word for a rapid discharge. The English language borrowed it and we have the word, 'vomit'.

    The arena comprised a wooden floor covered by sand. The Latin word for sand is harena or arena. Hence the English word, 'arena'.

    Some of the artists who have used the structure as a backdrop for their art are
    Paul McCartney (May 2003), Elton John (Sep. 2005) and Billy Joel (Jul. 2006).

    The Colosseum is the backdrop for several scenes in the film 'Roman Holiday' (1953).

    Bruce Lee's fight with Chuck Norris in 'The Way of the Dragon' (1972) was staged in the Colosseum.

    It is now a symbol of the international campaign against capital punishment, a practice which was abolished in Italy in 1948. The colour of the night time illumination of the Colosseum is changed from white to gold whenever the death sentence of a person is commuted or the person is released or the death sentence is repealed anywhere in the world. When capital punishment was abolished in New Mexico (USA) in 2009, the Colosseum was illuminated in gold.

    If you would like to play a quiz, here is a link:
    http://www.funtrivia.com/trivia-quiz/History/The-Colosseum-205795.html

    "To raise public revenue, Emperor Vespasian--who built the Colosseum--was the first to introduce pay toilets in the city of Rome. When his son and successor Titus protested that the toilets were raising a stink with the poor, Vespasian held a coin up to his nose and said, "money doesn't stink." Today, Romans still refer to public toilets as vespasiano." (http://www.corsinet.com/trivia/u-triv.html).

    Hours: Sun-Sat 8:30am-6:30pm
    Subway-Colosseo (B)
    First Written: Dec. 12, 2012

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    Yet another Colosseum review

    by tvor Written Nov 28, 2012

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    Yes, it's another tip on the Colosseum but our visit included getting to see the dungeons/hypogeum and the third level of the walls which can only be accessed via a formal tour.

    The Colosseum is an amphitheatre and was started in 72 C.E. It was completed and opened in 80 C.E. under Emperor Titus. It was used for public spectacles and festivals and gladiator competitions but was probably not used to set the early Christians against the lions as is popularly thought. It is believed that it's name was taken from a statue of Nero erected nearby which in turn was modeled after the Colossus of Rhodes. It was covered in marble and was painted but after the fall of Rome, the stone was pinched over the centuries to be used to build other things in the city.

    The Colosseum was generally opened to the public for 3 or 4 times a year, but for weeks each time as the spectacles and festivals would last that long. It's one of the top attractions in Rome so if you just turn up you will have to queue for tickets and it could be some time during the busiest times of the year. If you can, it's well worth booking tickets ahead of time online. You can then zip through a much shorter line.

    We booked with Tickitaly.com and booked the tour that includes the dungeons/basement part which has only been open to the public for a couple of years as has the third level. You get to go into the dungeons with the guide who points out where the original floors and walls were, where the winches were to raise the props and cages etc. to the main arena, where the tunnels to the gladiator barracks probably were as well. You can't go right out into the various corridors as they have not been shored up but you get a unique view from where you are.

    The tour started outside with some discussion on the construction of the building. We then climbed up two steep sets of stairs to the second level. There is also a museum up there with lots of things to look at as well as a little gift shop. The views are good but even better from the third level, up another steep set of uneven stairs. The hypogeum (basements) are down a proper set of stairs. There is a lift but they seem to be restricted to disabled and elderly people.

    We really enjoyed the tour and had a good guide. They use radio devices similar to mobile phones so you can hear the guide without them having to shout. The ticket to the Colosseum even without the tour allows you entry to the roman Forums and Palatine Hill across the road though I think those two are free anyway. The basic cost for an adult is 12 euros, and is good for 2 days. The extra tour for just the Colosseum lasts a little over an hour and there are also 3 hour tours that include the Forums in the high season. We were there in November so the only thing available was the shorter tour and I don't know if we'd have had the energy for the full 3 hours anyway.

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  • Hildeal's Profile Photo

    Colosseum

    by Hildeal Written Oct 5, 2012

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    Colosseum means colossal and huge. Originally it was called the Flavian Amphitheatre and it was the biggest . Amphitheatre in the Roman Empire. It has been there for 2000 years, through earthquake, looting, pollution and all the vibrations from the heavy Italian traffic. So the designers must have done a hell of good groundwork!

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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Il Colosseo, Rome’s Face to the World

    by von.otter Written Sep 3, 2012

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    “In Rome, the emperor sat in a special part of the Coliseum called the Caesarian Section.”
    — George Carlin (1937-2008)

    Properly known as the Amphitheatrum Flavium (Flavian Amphitheatre), this arena, which could seat 50,000 spectators, did not come to be called the Colosseum because of its size, 1,640 feet in circumference. The reason for the popular name is not because it was big, which it is, but because of the gold-plated colossal sculpture, on longer exiting, that once stood beside it.

    Colossus Neronis was 98-foot tall bronze likeness of Emperor Nero (37–68 AD). He had it erected in the vestibule of his imperial villa, known as the Domus Aurea. After Nero’s death, it was refashioned into the sun god, Sol Invictus, and moved next to the Flavian Amphitheatre.

    Emperor Vespasian began building the Colosseum in AD 72 on the site of a newly drained lake in the grounds of Nero’s Domus Aurea. The greatest amphitheatre the Romans built it is the most recognized landmark of the Eternal City.

    The web site listed, though not the official one, is a valuable resource for factual and visitor’s information.

    Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007 Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007 Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007 Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007 Il Colosseo, Roma, May 2007
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Colosseum

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 30, 2012

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    We started to explore Rome from The Colosseum, or the Flavian Amphitheatre. It is an elliptical amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome and the largest ever built in the Roman Empire. It is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering.

    You can watch my 2 min 15 sec Video Rome Colosseum out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Colosseum admission fee:
    Full ticket - €15.50
    EU reduced ticket - €10.50 (available only for European citizens aged between 18 and 25)
    EU complimentary ticket- €4.50 (available only for EU citizens aged above 65 and under 18)
    Opening hours:
    Mid February - mid March: 9 AM - 4.30 PM
    Mid March - end March: 9 AM - 5.00 PM
    End March - end August: 9 AM - 7.00 PM
    End August - end Sept.: 9 AM - 6.30 PM
    End Sept. - end October: 9 AM - 6.00 PM
    End October - mid March: 9 AM - 4.00 PM

    Colosseum
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  • dila's Profile Photo

    Colosseo

    by dila Written May 30, 2012

    used Archeologia Card so almost no waiting.Just show card and they tell were to walk.
    Try to get a map it is a audioguide map but makes it a lot easier.
    I also bought a book in the shop here Rome Virtual reconstruction of sites and monuments.
    If you like the old sites maybe you can buy it before you start.
    opening times every day 9.00 - 19.00
    closed january 1st december 25th

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  • fabric_letters's Profile Photo

    When in Rome...Its a must!

    by fabric_letters Written May 27, 2012

    Top of everyones list whilst visiting Italy is the Colosseum and although it was more than impressive with it’s incredible history, and its ability to stand tall century after century, I left feeling dissappointed.

    What was once a tremendous building that was used for all kinds of entertainment is slowing turning to a ruin from earthquakes and people who discreetly chip away at the stone and sell it.
    Although there is an clear sign of restoration work being done, the background of a busy metropolitan city kinda ruined the historical experiance for me.

    Either way, its a piece of architecture that simply cannot be missed, or even avoided due to its large size!

    I would allow a full morning or afternoon to see it fully.

    Inside the Colosseum
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  • Toughluck's Profile Photo

    Classical memories

    by Toughluck Updated Mar 28, 2012

    Imagine yourself back in ancient Rome. The solid walls of the Colosseum surround you and the heavy weight of the stone arches and the tiers of seats above you, pressing down. It's one thing to look at the diagrams, see the way that they make it stand, yet another to stand under the arches and feel the weight held above you and it's been standing for over 2,000 years.

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Comments (2)

  • goodfish's Profile Photo
    Jan 27, 2015 at 12:08 PM

    Update to previous post:
    http://www.coopculture.it/en/ is informing visitors, tour guides and school groups that for security reasons, backpacks, large handbags and luggage are not allowed inside the excavations at the Colosseum, Palatine and Forum in Rome. Actual dimensions of allowable bags has not yet been determined for these sites but have been recently restricted to 30x30x15 cm (abt 12 x 12 x 6") or smaller at Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplonti, Stabia and the Museum of Boscoreale so that might be a good guidline until further notice.

    Visitors to Rome are asked leave larger items at their hotel or check them at the left-luggage office at Termini. Additonally, if you have scheduled a tour at the Colosseum, Palatine and Forum, you're asked to arrive 30 minutes beforehand to ensure timely passage through security checks.

  • goodfish's Profile Photo
    Jan 16, 2015 at 11:47 AM

    1/16/2015: There appears to be a recent tightening of security at the Colosseum, Palatine and Forum. From the http://www.coopculture.it website for these three attractions:

    "ATTENTION PLEASE! We inform visitors that inside the monument it is strictly forbidden to enter with backpacks, handbags and luggage. "

    As there is no baggage check facilities at these attractions, it looks like you're going to have to visit these sites only with what can be carried in your pockets. I'll update this notice if newer information proves otherwise.

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