Isola Tiberina, Rome

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    Ponte Fabricio
    by tim07
  • Isola Tiberina
    by croisbeauty
  • Isola Tiberina
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    Isola Tiberiana

    by croisbeauty Updated Sep 12, 2011

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    Isola Tiberiana
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    Isola Tiberiana is small island in the middle of the River Tevere where the church of St. Bartolomeo stands. The church was erected on the ruins of the celebrated Temple of Aesculapius, the Greek God of medicine, once a pilgrimage site for the diseased.
    Two bridges join the island to the city, Ponte Fabricius known as Quattro Capi was built in 62 B.C. and is still intact today, the other is Ponte Cestio from 46 B.C.

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    Tiber Island

    by tim07 Updated Oct 19, 2009

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    The island is reached by two bridges, Ponte Fabricio and Ponte Cestio.

    Ponte Fabricio dates from 62 BC and is the oldest original bridge over the Tiber still in use.

    In the island's central piazza is San Bartolomeo all'Isola, this church dates back to the 10th century. The other main building on the island is a hospital.

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    Rome's only island

    by monica71 Updated Feb 14, 2009

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    Fatebenefratelli hospital - Isola Tiberina
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    Isola Tiberina is connected to Rome by 2 bridges (Ponte Garibaldi and Ponte Fabricio). Its old name was "the island between two bridges". The island was associated with the God of Greek medicine, Aesclepius.

    During plagues the sicks were isolated on the island to be cured. Even today the island has a strong reputation for curing people that spend the night here. Italians consider the hospital on the island to be one of the best in Rome.

    The Temple of Aesculapius was located where the San Bartolomeo church is today.

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  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    Isola Tiberina

    by WheninRome Updated Feb 14, 2009

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    Rome's Oldest Working Belltower on Isola Tiberina

    As you cross the Ponte Cestio bridge into Trastevere, you stroll through Tiber Island, which is a fascinating stopping point on your journey. In ancient times, a temple to the god of medicine used to be located on this island; later, Romans suffering from some medical ailment were brought here to spend a night and pray for recovery; later yet, during severe plagues those who were smitten were quarantined on this island. A lot of history for such a tiny island.

    Today, the island is dominated by the Fatebenefratelli, Rome's favored and most famous hospital for mothers-to-be. A small church adjacent to the hospital contains Rome's oldest working bell tower, built in 1069. The inside of this church is quaint, but with the beautiful artwork and detail symbolic of all Rome's churches.

    The short walk across the Ponte Cestio Bridge for a brief visit to Tiber Island is definitely worth the little bit of effort and time that it takes.

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    Tiber Island

    by traveloturc Written Sep 25, 2008

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    Tiber island ( isola Tiberina )is situated in the middle of the tiber river.This natural ford is connected to the city with the bridges Fabrizio and Cestio .This was place dedicated to the medicine god (Esculapio) .
    In the island you can visit the bell tower of St Bartholomeo Basilica and the bell tower of St Giovanni Calibita plus the Caetani tower and the jewish Hospital .

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    Broken Bridge

    by von.otter Updated Nov 30, 2007

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    Ponte Rotto, May 2007

    A little ways to the south of the Tiber Island in the middle of the river stands a large ruin; it is the only surviving arch of an old bridge. Its upper part still shows, in relief form a winged dragon, which is the coat-of-arms of Pope Gregory XIII (1502–1585). Over the centuries it has been called by different names; today it is commonly known as Ponte Rotto, Broken Bridge.

    On this crucial location the two sides of the River Tiber have been in connection since the third century BC. Originally, there was a wooden bridge at this point. At the start of the second century BC it was destroyed by flood; it took over 35 years to replace it with Rome's first stone bridge. It was also the longest at 165 yards, earning it the name Pons Maximus.

    Because the bridge is located where the river bends, the water's turbulence is stronger; the bridge was subject to heavier than normal wear. Two centuries after its was completed, the first of major restoration work was carried out, under Emperor Augustus.

    The stone structure kept suffering damages from the strong flow of water; in the 13th century it collapsed again.

    By the Renaissance, the span was known as Santa Maria Bridge. Restoration had been carried out shortly before it was completely swept away by a flood in 1557. Pope Gregory XIII rebuild it, 25 years later! On Christmas Eve 1598 the worst flood Rome's history, water rose over 16.5 feet above street level, smashed the bridge’s eastern arches.

    For almost three hundred years that bridge was left broken, giving rise to its name. In 1853 Pope Pius IX used the bridge's ruminants to support an iron footbridge. But it was not stable, and in 1887 the footbridge was dismantled and a modern traffic bridge was built directly next to it, called Ponte Palatino.

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  • rita_simoes's Profile Photo

    Isola Tiberina

    by rita_simoes Updated Oct 14, 2007

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    It's the world's smallest inhabited island, and there are a lot of activities going on there during the summer. This year (and I think every year) there was an open air cinema, with italian and english films, esplanades, restaurants and stalls selling books, souvenirs, handicraft, ecc. I spent quite some time there, because I fell in love with this little island as soon as my eyes caught it! It's so relaxing to lay down a bit and just watch the river flowing. It was really very pleasant.

    In the island there is also a maternity (imagine how cool it is to be born there!), a little church (Chiesa di San Bartolomeo) and the ruins of an old bridge (from the first town built with stone). One of the bridges that connects the island with the city centre is the oldest remaining bridge of Rome, dating back from 62 BC.

    For more pictures, please take a look at my Isola Tiberina travelogue.

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    Island Bridges

    by illumina Written May 24, 2006

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    The island is linked to the rest of Rome by two bridges. The Ponte Fabricio is the oldest bridge still in use in Rome, dating to 62 BC and connects the island to the northeast bank. while the Ponte Cestio, dating to 46 BC, connects the island to Trastevere on the south. Of the later, it was restored in 370 AD and only the central arch remains from that date; the rest is a late 19th century reconstruction. The former is also known as the Ponte Quattro Capi. Quattro Capi ("four heads" in Italian) refers to the four heads of the Janus herms on the parapet (see my first picture), which are apparently from the original bridge.

    At the eastern end of the island are the remains of Rome's first stone bridge, dating to 142 BC, and known as the Ponte Rotto (the Broken Bridge). Most of what remains of this is from a 1575 reconstruction by Gregory XIII, the rest of which was washed away in 1598. The modern bridge behind it (which you can make out in the second photo), Ponte Palatino, is sometimes called the English Bridge, because it is the only stretch of road in Rome on which cars are driven on the left. I was very surprised to read that in my guidebook, so had to take a peek at it - and it is actually true!

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    Tiber Island

    by illumina Written May 24, 2006

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    The Isola Tiberina (or Insula Tiberina in Latin) is a boat-shaped island in the southern bend of the Tiber. The island is well-known for being the site of an ancient temple to Aesculapius, the Greek god of medicine and healing. This was built during a great plague in Rome, at the instructions of the Sibyl. Although little of the Aesculapius temple remains, the island can still be considered a place of healing, as a modern-day hospital can be seen on the western end of the island (we could see the ambulances as we walked past on the bank).

    Some ancient buildings can still be seen, like the Caetani tower dating to the Middle Ages, and the church of San Bartolomeo that was built on the site of the temple of Esculapius. Unfortunately nothing is left of the 10th century church as it was almost entirely rebuilt in the 17th century.

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    ISOLA TIBERINA

    by ruki Written Aug 9, 2005

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    Small but very charming island on the river Tiber. The island has shape of an big boat. On this island I have eaten the most delicious and the cheapest ice cream in the hole Rome. The island are full of the cafes, restaurants and cinema. The most of them are open after 7 p.m.

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    In The Middle Of The Eternity

    by OttoMarzo Written Jun 28, 2005

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    Pay attention dudes! I swear, there's nothing better to go to the island, lay down by the river, sunglasses an a book. Then take the book away, put your hands behind your neck and watch all around yourself. The city's noise will be turned off, and all you will listen to, it will be the river and the birds. This is Rome, an eternal feeling of attractions and relax.

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    Cinema al fresco

    by happy-travels Written Apr 28, 2005

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    Circo Massimo

    During the summer months of L'Estate Romane, June to September the Isola hosts several nights of open air cinema. I saw "Ignorant fairies" here. An Italian film based in Rome. Tickets are cheap compared to other cinemas and they tend to show non commercial films. During the warm summer months it is the perfect place to see a film with the stars above and the Tiber river at your side.

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    Isola Tiberina

    by Julius_Caesar Written Feb 12, 2005

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    hey, this is where I was born! :'D

    In ancient times the island, which lay opposite the city’s port, had large structures of white travertine at either end built to resemble the stern and prow of a ship. Since 293 B.C., when a temple was dedicated to Aesculapius, the god of healing, the island has been associated with the sick (now there is also a hospital on the island). The bridge you see in the pic is Ponte Fabricio, the oldest original bridge, built in 62 B.C.

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    San Bartolomeo

    by tinyvulture Updated Jul 9, 2004

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    Isola Tiberina

    The Isola Tiberina in the middle of the Tiber is home of San Bartolomeo, a Romanesque church built in the year 1000 by Otto III to house the relics of St. Bartholomew. This particular evening, a party was going on. People were out on the balcony, candles were lit, and it looked pretty and festive.

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  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Isola Tiberina

    by Polly74 Written May 19, 2004

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    Isola Tiberina

    The smallest inhabited island of the world is tied to the medicine since III the century a.C., a tradition that continues today in the Fatebenefratelli hospital.
    Moreover you can find a very nice church of the X century recently restored and on the south side part of the Ponter Rotto (Broken Bridge), first stone bridge in Rome

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