Palatine Hill, Rome

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  • Students running around the Circus Maximus :o)
    Students running around the Circus...
    by Jefie
  • Palatine Hill seen from the Circus Maximus
    Palatine Hill seen from the Circus...
    by Jefie
  • Courtyard of Domus Augustana, the imperial palace
    Courtyard of Domus Augustana, the...
    by Jefie
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Peace and antiquity...............

    by leics Updated May 19, 2006

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    If you visit the Colosseum, your ticket will also let you visit the Palatine (entrance in the Forum area). The site of the original 'Rome', prehistoric remains have been excavated as well as the huge Roman palaces up here (although some may be closed for restoration) . The museum shows both roman and pre -Roman artefacts, which helps to put the whole city into some sort of archaeological perspective.

    Buy some lunch and take it up the hill. Explore the palaces, gaze over Rome spread out at your feet (fantastic views) and take a rest in the shady formal gardens. Enjoy!

    Palace on the Palatine. Palatine behind the Forum
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    Palatino

    by lina112 Updated May 12, 2006

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    Mitic place associated to Rome foundation, because is where lived the she-wolf who looked after to Romulo and Remo, foundres of Rome. Here have been discovered rest of the first humans assent on century IX b.c. It was the most wanted place to live during the republic and the empire. Emperors built here big residences to live.

    Sitio mitico asociado a la fundacion de Roma porque aqui es donde vivia la loba que cuido de Romulo y Remo, fundadores de Roma. Aqui han sido descubierto restos de los primeros asentamientos humanos. Fue el sitio mas deseado para vivir durante la epoca de la republica y los emperadores, muchos de ellos construyeron residencias para vivir.

    Palatino and Circo Massimo
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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Palatine: Hut of Romulus

    by illumina Written Apr 26, 2006

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    Beyond the gardens, in the south-west corner of the hill, excavations have revealed the oldest traces of a settlement in the city (8th century BC). The floors and post-holes of iron age huts are cut into the bedrock - the largest hut plan measures 5 by 3.5m, a slightly oval rectangle.

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    Palatine: Temple of Apollo

    by illumina Written Apr 26, 2006

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    The story goes that the temple was founded on a part of the site which Octavian (Augustus) had bought intending to extend his own house, but which was then struck by lightning, an omen that the space was to be used for religious purposes. Octavian had vowed a temple to Apollo at the battle of Naulochos in 36BC, and it was built here and dedicated in 28BC

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    Palatine - Palace and 'Stadium'

    by illumina Written Apr 26, 2006

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    The largest standing ruin is labelled as being the House of Augustus (Domus Augustana), although I'm sure my Oxford Archaeological Guide says it's Domitian's Palace. It seems possible that the House of Augustus and the House of Livia were both incorporated into the Flavian emperor's residence.

    The best preserved remains are in the lower stories - closed to the public of course - but an impressive amount can be seen from the top. My photos show one of the inner courtyards, and the stadium - originally a great sunken garden, which contains a later elliptical structure which is apparently the arena of a private amphitheatre.

    Interior Courtyard Stadium Stadium
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  • leics's Profile Photo

    The Palatine.....the oldest part of Rome.

    by leics Updated Feb 17, 2006

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    The views from the Palatine Hill are stunning, and the Farnese gardens are lovely. The palaces of Roman emperors stretch before you, including the House of Livia with its wall-paintings and mosaics. Many people do not realise that the hill really is the oldest part of Rome.........an Iron Age settlement which dates from 800 BCE has been excavated. The Palatine museum has interesting displays about this very early settlement, as well as many artefacts discovered on the site.

    Palatine palace.
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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Palatine Hill

    by Jim_Eliason Written Oct 23, 2005

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    Palatine Hill was the rich neighborhood of Rome. In fact the word "palace" derives from this hill. The largest complex on the hill is the palace of the emporer Domitian. The area is accessed from Via San Gregorio and requires an admission ticket.

    Palatine Hill Palatine Hill Palatine Hill Palatine Hill Palatine Hill
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    Palatine

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 28, 2005

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    The Palatine, once the residence of emperors and aristocrats, is the most pleasant of Rome's ancient sites. The ruins range from the simple house in which Augustus is thought to have lived (in fact he was born here in 63 BC), to the Domus Flavia and Domus Augustana, the public and private wings of a luxurious palace built by Domitian.

    According to legend the twins Romulus and Remus were brought up on the Palatine by a wolf. Here Romulus, having killed his brother, is said to have founded the village that was destined to become Rome. Traces of mud huts dating back to the 8th century BC have been found on the hill, lending archaeological support to the legend.

    Stadium

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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    The Roman Forum Part 2: The Palatine Hill

    by Paul2001 Written May 10, 2005

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    The Palatine Hill is the supposed location of the first settlements in Rome. There are traces of an Iron Age village on the hill to support this theory.
    At the time of my visit, the admission price to the Palatine Hill was included with that of the Roman Forum but perhaps I am confused since the Forum is suppose to be free while the Palatine Hill is suppose to charge 6 Euros for admittence. The hill overlooks both the Forum and the Colosseum. In time it became as the Roman Republic rose, the Palatine Hill became prime real estate and many important officals lived here. All that remains today are the ruins of what were at onetime magnificent palaces and bath houses. Probably the most beautiful part of Palatine Hill for me was the Farnese Gardens. This is the first botanical gardens ever in Europe. They do not date from Roman times but were actually laid out by Cardinal Alessandro Farnese in the mid-sixteenth century. They include a lovely pavilion and terrace from which there are good view of Rome. The whole place seemed very lush especially so during my visit because it had just rained about one hour before. Also I noticed that few tourists who visit the Roman Forum seem to want to make the effort to climb up the hill. This means the place is actually very peaceful.

    The Farnese Gardens, the Palatine Hill
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  • Julius_Caesar's Profile Photo

    Palatine hill

    by Julius_Caesar Written May 4, 2005

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    According to tradition, Romulus and Remus were brought up here by a wolf in a cave. Traces of Iron Age huts, dating from the 8th century B.C., have been found on the Palatine hill, providing archaeological support for the area’s legendary links with the founding of Rome. The Palatine was a very desirable place to live, becoming home to some of the city’s most famous inhabitants, and, later, emperors (hence the name ‘palace’). Admission fee is 10€, 6.5€ for E.U. citizens, free for 65+ year old people. The ticket is also valid for the Colosseum.

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  • IIGUANA's Profile Photo

    The Palatine

    by IIGUANA Written Feb 22, 2005

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    The Palatine is where the nucleus of the ancient Roma was located (the "square Rome"). As the legend says, it was founded by Romulus by 753 AC.
    In its origins, it was composed by 2 hills: the Palatium and the Germalus, both of them united later by the Domiciano. The Palatine has the best ruins and the richest historical background. In the hill you can find Ciceron's house and many emperor's palaces, as well as the Casa di Livia -the house of Augustus- with a very good collection of roman artifacts.
    On the hill you can also find the Palatinian Stadium (built by Domiciano), the Domus Severiana and the Paedagogium, the school for imperial slaves.
    One tip: the entrance ticket to the Palatine serves also for the Coliseum. It's better to buy the ticket here, even if you're not going to visit it, as the queues in the Coliseum can be very long. This way, you just pass by and show your ticket.

    Palatinian Stadium
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    Palace of the Caesars

    by Blatherwick Updated Dec 30, 2004

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    When you visit the the Roman ruins make sure that you go up Palatine Hill. This place was dominated by the massive palace complex of the Roman emperors. If Augustus had intially lived in a relatively modest house on the hill, then his successors showed no such restraint. The palace was placed so as to look down upon the Circus Maximus.

    The most impressive ruins remaining today are those of the Domus Flavia and the Domus Augustana, both built by emperor Domitian. The Domus Flavia was the official part of the palace in which emissaries might be received or state banquets might be held. The Domus Augustana meanwhile was the emperor's luxurious private residence.

    Part of Domitian's palace was this open area known as the Stadium. Opinions are divided on if this was a stadium for exercising horses or merely a large garden. The oval enclosure at one end of it is an addition made by the Ostrogothic king Theodoric in the 6th century.

    Palace of the Caesars
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  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Palatino

    by Polly74 Written May 19, 2004

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    Palatino is the mythical place where Rome was founded: here was situated the lair of the wolf that raised Romolo and Remo.
    This place offers spectacular views of the ancient Rome.
    Being the more centralised of the seven hills, in republican and imperial era Palatino was the more attractive place to reside.
    The most important site you can visit today are Domus Augustana, Domiziano Stadium, Domus Flavia, Livia's House (Livia was Emperor Augusto's wife), ...

    Ruins of Augusto's House

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  • Brehone's Profile Photo

    Palace Ruins

    by Brehone Written May 15, 2004

    Near the Roman Forum there is an area that is the ruins of an old palace. This is a fee area, but if you have already been to the Coliseum your ticket works for this area too. There is an old Roman bath house that is beautiful and a view of Circus Maximus. It was a very interesting walk.

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Palentine

    by tompt Written Jan 28, 2004

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    With the entrance ticket to the Coloseum you can also visit the Palentine.

    The palentine is at an hill at one of the best locations in Rome. The old emperors knew that and built their palaces there. It is said that it also is the place were the she-wolve nursed Romulus and Remus.
    Today you can discover the remains of the once elegant palaces of the emperors.

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