Pantheon, Rome

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  • RoscoeGregg's Profile Photo

    Do This If You Do Nothing Else

    by RoscoeGregg Written Apr 4, 2011

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    The eye of the Gods
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    If you have only one day in Rome (a tragedy if true) this is the thing to see. Do not be put off by the crowded entrance. Once inside there is a lot of room. It is without a doubt one of the most beautiful interior spaces ever created by the hand of man.

    Barbara bought me an Ipod last year. I use the heck out of it! This leads me to the last of my tip. You can down load and listen to Yale’s Professor Kleiner’s lectures on Roman Architecture. Her lecture on the Pantheon in particular is just fascinating and will greatly improve your appreciation of this world class building. I highly recommend that you down load and listen to it before you come to see the Pantheon.

    http://oyc.yale.edu/history-of-art/roman-architecture/content/downloads

    I believe it is episode 15

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Pantheon

    by mindcrime Written Mar 20, 2011

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    Pantheon
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    Pantheon(pic 1) is one of the must-see sites in Rome so it was no surprise that we met with hordes of other tourists there. It is located at piazza della Rotonda(pic 5), a square full of tourists, locals and carriages that wait for those who want to see Rome on a romantic but expensive way.

    On the square there is a marble fountain with an obelisk in the center, people using it as a meeting point. You can drink your coffee or have lunch at one of the cafes on the square (and pay the privilege for the view) but we preferred to go inside the Pantheon which an architectural masterpiece.

    This amazing roman temple was built back in 126AD by Marcus Agrippa. There was another temple on the same spot that was burnt in 80AD so emperor Hadrian asked for a new one. It was dedicated to All The Gods of Ancient Rome. It’s the best preserved monument of Ancient Rome (and also the largest).

    Although there’s a portico with 3 raws of Corinthian columns the main building is circular, check the back side (pic 4 taken from piazza della Minerva). Of course, you have to go inside to appreciate the beauty and scale of the temple but it was annoying with so many other people around (pic 2) but fortunately you can enjoy the “oculus”, the opening in the middle of the concrete dome(pic 3).

    Since the 7th century turned into a catholic church and this is how it’s used today although you wont feel anything “religious” inside here with so many cameras clicking non stop next to you :) Photography is allowed inside.

    The Pantheon has also been used as a tomb since the renaissance era. Famous people among the ones that were buried here are king Vittorio Emanuele II and the painter Raphael…

    By the way there is only natural light inside (coming from the “octulus” and the door. The floor has a small angle so when it rains the water goes to the drains.
    It’s open daily 8.30-19.30 and there’s no entrance fee

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  • shrimp56's Profile Photo

    The Pantheon: #1 on my "must-see" list

    by shrimp56 Written Oct 25, 2010

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    The Pantheon was my biggest "must-sees." When you sit inside for a while, as we did while our friends wandered, the later decorative additions fade away in the presence of the enormity of the project.

    One thing I learned from teaching history of art, was, that in addition to the dome being "coffered" to reduce the weight, the concrete itself was formulated to be lighter as the dome reaches for the top and that amazing occulus. I loved the piazza here--full of people, yes, but smaller and less tick-tack. If we hadn't been so tired we would have sat in a sidewalk cafe and enjoyed the view.

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  • berenices's Profile Photo

    Pay homage to Raphael

    by berenices Updated Oct 8, 2010

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    There could not have been a better or more appropriate place to bury this exceptional man. Since the Renaissance period, the Pantheon, an ancient temple, has been a place where the illustrious dead were buried. Raphael himself had expressed desire to be buried there. Raphael died at 37 years of age, in 1520, and his body was immediately transferred here.

    The tomb is located on the third chapel on the left side of the visitor entering the Pantheon. Behind and above the tomb is a statue called Madonna del Sasso by Lorenzo Lotto, a pupil of the great master done in 1523-34. In 1833, Pope Gregory VI ordered the opening of the grave to verify the existence of the body. It was found, and as a gift, the pope gave an ancient marble sarcophagus on which was inscribed ILLE HIC EST RAPHAEL TIMUIT QUO SOSPITE VINCI RERUM MAG PARENS ET MORIENTE MORI (Here lies Raphael, by whom Nature feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.)

    For a man who gave so much beauty to the world in his short life, the tomb is quite simple, unpretentious, and i dare say, not even beautiful. Still, to stand in front of his tomb to pay homage to one of the world's greatest, is humbling.

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  • imeley's Profile Photo

    The Pantheon

    by imeley Updated Oct 2, 2010
    The Pantheon
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    Sad to say I was't able to go inside as it as already closed. During my visit there was a major renovation going on the facade of the building. The interior is said to be ecclesiastic, but the marble floor - it's design features a series of geometric pattern is still the ancient Roman original.

    Built more than 1800 years ago, the magnificent Pantheon building still stands as a reminder of the great Roman Empire.

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    The first temple built for the common people

    by Huks Written May 15, 2010

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    Entrance of the Pantheon
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    Pantheon represents a cultural revolution because it was the first temple built for the common people.
    Building is excellent example of great architectonic solution and the height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 metres.

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  • windoweb's Profile Photo

    Pantheon Rome

    by windoweb Written May 4, 2010

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    Inside the Pantheon

    The Pantheon is a magnificent ancient temple in Rome that was later converted into the church of Santa Maria ad Martyres. Dating from 125 AD, this is the most complete ancient building in Rome and one of the city's most spectacular sights.

    The oculus, the only source of natural light in the Pantheon, is a round opening in the center of the dome. It is 27 feet in diameter and open to the sky (the floor is gently sloped to allow for runoff of rainwater).

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  • cmcard2's Profile Photo

    An Architectural Marvel

    by cmcard2 Updated Apr 28, 2010

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    The Pantheon
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    The Panteon should be on everyone's "must see" list when visiting Rome. When one enters the Piazza della Rotonda, the Fontana del Pantheon obstructs your view of one of the best preserved and one of the most architecturaly significant buildings of ancient Rome.

    First it was the largest dome in the world until 1436 when the Duomo was built in Florence.
    The Pantheon also contains what might be the first skylight with its' oculus, which opens to the outside. Rainwater freely flows through it and to the drains in the center. Notice the marble floor, which is the ancient Roman original.

    The scripture on the outside of the building translates "Marcus Agrippa, son of Lucius, in his third consulate, made it." He was the son -in-law of Augustus. The first rendition, built in 27 B.C. was proof that this was a talented engineer. This insignia can be seen above the outside temple like portico that is supported by massive columns.

    The first Pantheon was severly damaged and rebuilt by Emperor Hadrian. It is thought to have been molded from the original form. This included the huge double bronze doors, some 21 feet high.

    Originally a temple for pagan gods (Pantheon means honor to all gods), it was later converted into a church. It houses the tomb of the Renaissance artist Raphael.

    There is a tendency to walk in, look up, look down, and look around, and then leave. Consider going outside and walking along the wall to the side of the Pantheon to get a feel for its breath and depth. Walk back to the fountain, put your finger in the hole of the water fountain for some clear, cool water. Or go to one of the outdoor cafe's and take in how the hustle and bustle of those who work seem unaffected amidst one of the giants of antiquity.

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  • PeterKnudsen's Profile Photo

    Pantheon best thing it is free

    by PeterKnudsen Written Jan 16, 2010

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    Pantheon Commentary
    The Pantheon is one of the great spiritual buildings of the world. It was built as a Roman temple and later consecrated as a Catholic Church. Its monumental porch originally faced a rectangular colonnaded temple courtyard and now enfronts the smaller Piazza della Rotonda. Through great bronze doors, one enters one great circular room. The interior volume is a cylinder above which rises the hemispherical dome. Opposite the door is a recessed semicircular apse, and on each side are three additional recesses, alternately rectangular and semicircular, separated from the space under the dome by paired monolithic columns. The only natural light enters through an unglazed oculus at the center of the dome and through the bronze doors to the portico. As the sun moves, striking patterns of light illuminate the walls and floors of porphyry, granite and yellow marbles.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Pantheon

    by Tom_Fields Written Dec 20, 2009

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    The Pantheon
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    This temple was built in 27 BC, then destroyed by fire in 80 AD. It was then rebuilt under the emperor Hadrian. Later emperors modified it. It was built to honor all pagan deities worshipped by the Romans. The Catholic Church made it into a church, adding the bones of early martyrs brought from the Catacombs, in 690 AD. Under the Lateran Treaty of 1929, it became a national church.

    This is the only intact structure left in Rome by the ancient Romans. It remains one of the city's true marvels.

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Plain perfection

    by Tijavi Updated Nov 20, 2009

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    A study in perfect symmetry
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    Hailed as one of the most perfect buildings in the world for its symmetry, the Pantheon is also one of the best-preserved ancient buildings in Rome. Built in the 1st century AD it was intended as a temple to all gods. Today it houses the tombs of well-known Italians such a Raphael and the founder of modern day Italy, Vittorio Emmanuel II.

    The hemispherical dome is one of the most amazing features of the Pantheon. Inside, you could feel its immensity and the vast space beneath the dome. And for shutter-happy tourists, the Pantheon is a perfect subject both within and outside that lends itself beautifully to the photographer-tourist's eyes.

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    Pantheon

    by apbeaches Updated Oct 12, 2009

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    The Pantheon was built by Marcus Agrippa as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome, and rebuilt in the early 2nd century AD. A near-contemporary writer, Cassius Dio, speculates that the name comes from the statues of many gods placed around the building, or from the resemblance of the dome to the heavens.

    The building is circular with a portico of three ranks of huge granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment opening into the rotunda, under a coffered, concrete dome, with a central opening to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 142 ft. A rectangular structure links the portico with the rotunda. It is one of the best preserved of all Roman buildings. It has been in continuous use throughout its history.

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Pantheon

    by aukahkay Updated Oct 9, 2009

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    The oculus of the Pantheon
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    The Pantheon is the glory of Rome - it is the city's only architecturally intact monument from the classical times. It was built by Agrippa in 27 BC and dedicated to the gods of the Julian family. The portico has 16 monolithic granite columns. Light enters through an opening at the top of the dome - an oculus 9m across through which the sky seems to descend to the temple. The ceiling of the dome was originally covered by bronze but taken down by Pope Urban VIII and used for the baldacchino in St Peter's basilica. There is a tomb containing the remains of Raphael.

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  • jlanza29's Profile Photo

    Standing after 2000 years !!!!!

    by jlanza29 Updated Sep 21, 2009

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    One of the oldest standing structures in the world, the Pantheon is quite a site, admission if free and the surrounding piazza is one of the coolest in all of Rome. Give yourself about an hour here !!!!

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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    Pantheon

    by tim07 Updated Aug 5, 2009

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    Dome
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    The Pantheon was designed by emperor Hadrian in AD 118-125. It was built as a temple to "all the gods".

    The beauty & scale of this magnificent building are best appreciated from the inside. The rotunda's height & diameter are equal; 43.3 m (142 ft). The oculus, the hole at the top of the dome, provides the only light. Its diameter is 9 m (30 ft). The marble floor is the original Roman design. Around the walls are shrines to Raphael & former Italian kings.

    The building is free to enter & is open daily except 1 Jan, 1 May & 25 Dec.

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