Pantheon, Rome

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    An Honor Guard at the Pantheon

    by von.otter Written Dec 31, 2012

    “And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they were all with one accord in one place. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance.”
    — from the Holy Bible, Acts 2:1–4

    Founded in 1878, the monarchist organization, the National Institute of Honor Guards keeps watch over the royal tombs at the Pantheon. Italy’s first king, Vittorio Emanuele II and his son Umberto I, as well as Umberto's queen, Margherita are entombed in the Pantheon. In addition the painters Raphael Sanzio da Urbino and Annibale Carracci, the composer Arcangelo Corelli, and the architect Baldassare Peruzzi are also entombed here.

    The Honor Guards are shown at the Pantheon on Pentecost. Following Mass, baskets of red rose petals are dropped through the Pantheon’s oculus to simulate the descent of the Holy Spirit. The floor becomes a carpet of red (see photo #4).

    This is glorious ancient building is a Roman Catholic church, dedicated to Santa Maria ad Martyres, also known as Santa Maria dei Martiri, Our Lady and all Martyrs.

    The Pantheon, Rome, May 2007 The Pantheon, Rome, May 2007 The Pantheon, Rome, May 2007 The Pantheon, Rome, May 2007 The Pantheon, Rome, May 2007
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    02-Houseful of gods

    by anilpradhanshillong Updated Aug 28, 2012

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    The next day, bursting with anticipation, boarded Tram No. 8 going to Largo Argentina. From there, the Pantheon, a temple consecrated to all the gods of ancient Rome, was a mere 10-minutes walk. There was no need for a map. You ask anyone the directions to the Pantheon and you’ll receive detailed instructions.

    This is a huge structure with a canopy at the top and massive pillars in the forecourt standing to the north of Piazza della Rotonda. Somewhat in the middle of the city square is the Fontana del Pantheon, a fountain constructed by Giacomo Della Porta in 1575. An Egyptian obelisk was added to it in 1711. It’s hard to imagine that the Pantheon has withstood the ravages of time for over two centuries (re-built by Emperor Hadrian in about 126 AD) and the best part is entrance is free.

    Once inside, you gaze awe-struck by the huge canopy with an oculus in the centre to let natural light in. The entire round structure has sculptures and paintings of a Christian nature. Straight ahead is an altar and quite a few benches. It’s only then that you realise you are standing in a place of worship, actually a Roman Catholic Church since the 7th century. In the centre is a cordoned off area with holes on the floor. The holes are the outlet for rain water to drain off. Of particular interest is the square design of the floor which is in sharp contrast to the circular nature of the structure.

    Most of the exhibits have numbers. These are for the convenience of those who wish to pay for an audio guide. They punch in the number and listen to the commentary pertaining to that particular exhibit. The centre of attraction, undoubtedly, is the marble sarcophagus of Raphael Sanzio, painter and architect par excellence, a person who transcends definition. In his grave is inscribed these immortal words written by Pietro Bembo:

    "Ille hic est Raffael, timuit quo sospite vinci, rerum magna parens et moriente mori."

    This would mean, "Here lies that famous Raphael by whom Nature feared to be conquered while he lived, and when he was dying, feared herself to die."

    Timings: 9 am - 6.30 pm (Mon–Sat); 9 am –1 pm (Sun)

    First Written: Aug. 28, 2012

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    Piazza della Rotonda

    by von.otter Updated Jul 6, 2012

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    “Walking around it today, it is still possible to experience something of the variety of architectural forms and settings, and the skillful way in which Hadrian and his architect have contrived the meetings of the axes, the surprises that await the turning of a corner, and the vistas that open to view.”
    — from “History of Architecture” by Sir Banister Fletcher (1866-1953), he is talking about the Pantheon, the main historic attraction of Piazza della Rotonda

    The large square that stretches out in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda . The grand and ancient monument that dominates the square so fully it has given the piazza’s name.

    This piazza is the heart of the Centro Storico (historic district) of the city. With its active cafes, bars and restaurants, which encircle the square and its fountain, this piazza is a popular meeting place, for locals and tourists alike; the lively atmosphere continues into the night.

    We not only have to thank Pope Gregory XIII for the calendar we use everyday, but also for the elegant, 16th-century, marble fountain, designed by Giacomo della Porta for this pope, that stands at the square’s center. The obelisk at the fountain’s center was found in the Iseo Campense and was placed here in 1711 on the order of Pope Clemens XI; the architect Filippo Barigioni decorated the obelisk’s pedestal with dolphins (see photo #4) and the coats of arms of Clement XI.

    One of the city’s best hotels, Albergo del Senato, fronts onto this piazza (see von.otter’s Rome hotel tips for additional information and photos).

    Piazza della Rotonda, 06:00, Roma, 05/07 Fountain, Obelisk, Piazza della Rotonda, Roma 5/07 Fountain, Obelisk, Piazza della Rotonda, Roma 5/07 Fountain, Piazza della Rotonda, Roma, 12/00 Piazza della Rotonda,Evening, Roma, 05/07
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    Pantheon

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 30, 2012

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    The Pantheon ("to every god") is a building, commissioned by Marcus Agrippa as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome, and rebuilt by Emperor Hadrian in about 126 AD.

    The Italian kings Vittorio Emanuele II and Umberto I as well as the famous Renaissance painter Raphael and his fiancée are buried in the Pantheon. It is a wonderful example of second century Roman architecture. It boasts mathematical genius and simple geometry that today still impresses architects and amazes the eyes of casual viewers.
    Opening hours: Mon – Sat: 9 am - 6.30 pm and Sun: 9 am –1 pm.

    You can watch my 1 min 14 sec Video Rome Pantheon out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Pantheon
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    Pantheon

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    The Pantheon was erected in 27 BC by Agrippa, son is law of Emporer Augustus, but later on it was completely rebuilt in 123 AD by Emperor Hadrian, who maintained the old inscription celebrating Agrippa. The temple was dedicated to all Gods worshiped by the Romans, and was converted into the church in 608.
    The Pantheon is the only large monument of ancient Rome which is well preserved. It has magnificent large circular hall, La Rotonda, and that's the other name for it preferable by the Romans.

    Pantheon Pantheon

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Stunning!

    by zadunajska8 Written Oct 23, 2011

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    We were blown away by the Pantheon. It was obviously on our must do list when we got to Rome as it is one of the famous attractions but we were not prepared for the sheer size of it. Perhaps more importantly though was the feeling it inspires as you just look at it from the outside and 'feel' the age and character of it's overwhelming presence in this pretty square. The inside is beautifully decorated, the only downside being that there will be so many other people there to see it as well and therefore there is a fair amount of noise. I thought that the best view of this was at sunset from the other side of the fountain in piazza del rotunda (it's likely to be closed by that point so you'll need to see the inside at some other time).

    Pantheon At Night Pantheon The Dome of the Pantheon Pantheon Inside the Pantheon
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    In Awe at architecture

    by Arizona_Girl Written May 19, 2011

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    There was a ton of restoration construction on the outside when we were there. But the inside was beautiful and breath taking to study. Free stop, its an active church so there are chairs that you can sit and admire the great architecture.

    Inside Pantheaon
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    Do This If You Do Nothing Else

    by RoscoeGregg Written Apr 4, 2011

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    If you have only one day in Rome (a tragedy if true) this is the thing to see. Do not be put off by the crowded entrance. Once inside there is a lot of room. It is without a doubt one of the most beautiful interior spaces ever created by the hand of man.

    Barbara bought me an Ipod last year. I use the heck out of it! This leads me to the last of my tip. You can down load and listen to Yale’s Professor Kleiner’s lectures on Roman Architecture. Her lecture on the Pantheon in particular is just fascinating and will greatly improve your appreciation of this world class building. I highly recommend that you down load and listen to it before you come to see the Pantheon.

    http://oyc.yale.edu/history-of-art/roman-architecture/content/downloads

    I believe it is episode 15

    The eye of the Gods Illuminating our minds Where all the famous have stood
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    Pantheon

    by mindcrime Written Mar 20, 2011

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    Pantheon(pic 1) is one of the must-see sites in Rome so it was no surprise that we met with hordes of other tourists there. It is located at piazza della Rotonda(pic 5), a square full of tourists, locals and carriages that wait for those who want to see Rome on a romantic but expensive way.

    On the square there is a marble fountain with an obelisk in the center, people using it as a meeting point. You can drink your coffee or have lunch at one of the cafes on the square (and pay the privilege for the view) but we preferred to go inside the Pantheon which an architectural masterpiece.

    This amazing roman temple was built back in 126AD by Marcus Agrippa. There was another temple on the same spot that was burnt in 80AD so emperor Hadrian asked for a new one. It was dedicated to All The Gods of Ancient Rome. It’s the best preserved monument of Ancient Rome (and also the largest).

    Although there’s a portico with 3 raws of Corinthian columns the main building is circular, check the back side (pic 4 taken from piazza della Minerva). Of course, you have to go inside to appreciate the beauty and scale of the temple but it was annoying with so many other people around (pic 2) but fortunately you can enjoy the “oculus”, the opening in the middle of the concrete dome(pic 3).

    Since the 7th century turned into a catholic church and this is how it’s used today although you wont feel anything “religious” inside here with so many cameras clicking non stop next to you :) Photography is allowed inside.

    The Pantheon has also been used as a tomb since the renaissance era. Famous people among the ones that were buried here are king Vittorio Emanuele II and the painter Raphael…

    By the way there is only natural light inside (coming from the “octulus” and the door. The floor has a small angle so when it rains the water goes to the drains.
    It’s open daily 8.30-19.30 and there’s no entrance fee

    Pantheon interior of Pantheon oculus of Pantheon backside of Pantheon piazza della Rotonda
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    The Pantheon: #1 on my "must-see" list

    by shrimp56 Written Oct 25, 2010

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    The Pantheon was my biggest "must-sees." When you sit inside for a while, as we did while our friends wandered, the later decorative additions fade away in the presence of the enormity of the project.

    One thing I learned from teaching history of art, was, that in addition to the dome being "coffered" to reduce the weight, the concrete itself was formulated to be lighter as the dome reaches for the top and that amazing occulus. I loved the piazza here--full of people, yes, but smaller and less tick-tack. If we hadn't been so tired we would have sat in a sidewalk cafe and enjoyed the view.

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    Pay homage to Raphael

    by berenices Updated Oct 8, 2010

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    There could not have been a better or more appropriate place to bury this exceptional man. Since the Renaissance period, the Pantheon, an ancient temple, has been a place where the illustrious dead were buried. Raphael himself had expressed desire to be buried there. Raphael died at 37 years of age, in 1520, and his body was immediately transferred here.

    The tomb is located on the third chapel on the left side of the visitor entering the Pantheon. Behind and above the tomb is a statue called Madonna del Sasso by Lorenzo Lotto, a pupil of the great master done in 1523-34. In 1833, Pope Gregory VI ordered the opening of the grave to verify the existence of the body. It was found, and as a gift, the pope gave an ancient marble sarcophagus on which was inscribed ILLE HIC EST RAPHAEL TIMUIT QUO SOSPITE VINCI RERUM MAG PARENS ET MORIENTE MORI (Here lies Raphael, by whom Nature feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.)

    For a man who gave so much beauty to the world in his short life, the tomb is quite simple, unpretentious, and i dare say, not even beautiful. Still, to stand in front of his tomb to pay homage to one of the world's greatest, is humbling.

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    The Pantheon

    by imeley Updated Oct 2, 2010

    Sad to say I was't able to go inside as it as already closed. During my visit there was a major renovation going on the facade of the building. The interior is said to be ecclesiastic, but the marble floor - it's design features a series of geometric pattern is still the ancient Roman original.

    Built more than 1800 years ago, the magnificent Pantheon building still stands as a reminder of the great Roman Empire.

    The Pantheon

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    The first temple built for the common people

    by Huks Written May 15, 2010

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    Pantheon represents a cultural revolution because it was the first temple built for the common people.
    Building is excellent example of great architectonic solution and the height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 metres.

    Entrance of the Pantheon Oculus of the Pantheon
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    Pantheon Rome

    by windoweb Written May 4, 2010

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    The Pantheon is a magnificent ancient temple in Rome that was later converted into the church of Santa Maria ad Martyres. Dating from 125 AD, this is the most complete ancient building in Rome and one of the city's most spectacular sights.

    The oculus, the only source of natural light in the Pantheon, is a round opening in the center of the dome. It is 27 feet in diameter and open to the sky (the floor is gently sloped to allow for runoff of rainwater).

    Inside the Pantheon
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    An Architectural Marvel

    by cmcard2 Updated Apr 28, 2010

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    The Panteon should be on everyone's "must see" list when visiting Rome. When one enters the Piazza della Rotonda, the Fontana del Pantheon obstructs your view of one of the best preserved and one of the most architecturaly significant buildings of ancient Rome.

    First it was the largest dome in the world until 1436 when the Duomo was built in Florence.
    The Pantheon also contains what might be the first skylight with its' oculus, which opens to the outside. Rainwater freely flows through it and to the drains in the center. Notice the marble floor, which is the ancient Roman original.

    The scripture on the outside of the building translates "Marcus Agrippa, son of Lucius, in his third consulate, made it." He was the son -in-law of Augustus. The first rendition, built in 27 B.C. was proof that this was a talented engineer. This insignia can be seen above the outside temple like portico that is supported by massive columns.

    The first Pantheon was severly damaged and rebuilt by Emperor Hadrian. It is thought to have been molded from the original form. This included the huge double bronze doors, some 21 feet high.

    Originally a temple for pagan gods (Pantheon means honor to all gods), it was later converted into a church. It houses the tomb of the Renaissance artist Raphael.

    There is a tendency to walk in, look up, look down, and look around, and then leave. Consider going outside and walking along the wall to the side of the Pantheon to get a feel for its breath and depth. Walk back to the fountain, put your finger in the hole of the water fountain for some clear, cool water. Or go to one of the outdoor cafe's and take in how the hustle and bustle of those who work seem unaffected amidst one of the giants of antiquity.

    The Pantheon Inside of the Pantheon No Lines to See the Pantheon
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