Piazza Venezia - Vittoriano, Rome

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  • Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    by zadunajska8
  • Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    by zadunajska8
  • Altare della Patria. - Vittoriano.
    Altare della Patria. - Vittoriano.
    by breughel
  • Huks's Profile Photo

    The Monument of Victor Emmanuel II

    by Huks Written May 15, 2010

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    View from top of the Monument
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    The Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II (National Monument of Victor Emmanuel II) is a monument to honour Victor Emmanuel, the first king of a unified Italy, located in Rome, Italy. The monument was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi.
    It is place from where you can take excellent photos from top of the Monument of Victor Emmanuel II.

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    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument

    by Tom_Fields Written Dec 20, 2009

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    The Vittorio Emanuele Monument
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    Some have likened this huge monument to an oversized typewriter. While much-criticized for its sheer size and grandiosity, it memorializes the short-lived monarchy of King Vittorio Emanuele, who reigned during the period of Italian unification. Giuseppe Sacconi (1885-1911) built it about 1900. The tomb of the Unknown Soldier was added in 1921. Like it or not, it's very difficult to miss.

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    Il Vittoriano

    by tim07 Updated Nov 8, 2009

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    This is a monument built to honour Victor Emmanuel II, the first king of a unified Italy. It's situated between the Piazza Venezia & Capitoline hill.

    The building is made of white marble and features impressive stairways & columns. A huge equestrian statue of Victor Emmanuel is situated at the front. On the roof there are two statues of the goddess Victoria. Also at the monument is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with an eternal flame. Inside is a museum dedicated to Italian Reunification.

    The monument is regarded by many as way too large & pompous. Nicknames such as the "wedding cake" and "typewriter" have been given to it. The highlight for me was the views of Rome from the terraces. Here you'll also find a cafe, an ideal place to relax on a hot day. It's a bit pricey though.

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    Piazza Venezia and Il Vittoriano

    by aukahkay Written Oct 11, 2009

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    Il Vittoriano
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    Piazza Venezia is the heart of Rome, the hub of the city's road network. On the piazza, Il Vittoriano dominates the square. Romans refer to it as the typewriter, the wedding cake or even Rome's false teeth. The monument was erected in honour of Victor Emmanuel II of Savoy, the first king of the newly unified Italy.

    Below the equestrian statue of Victor Emmanuel is the tomb of the unknown soldier flanked by perpetually burning flames and two armed guards.

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    Monument Vittorio Emanuele

    by icunme Updated Sep 7, 2009

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    Monument Vittoriano Emanuele
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    The monument itself is a stunning presence - it commemorates the Risorgimento - the social and political "resurgence" as well as the military conflicts that recovered land - paving the way for Italy's eventual unification. A must-see is the museum inside that contains historic art and artifacts, photos, print media on the many elements and personages of note in this period. Of particular interest are the rooms devoted to World War I.
    During the 18th century, intellectual changes began to dismantle traditional values and institutions. Liberal ideas from France and Britain spread rapidly, and from 1789 the French Revolution became the genesis of "liberal Italians". A series of political and military events resulted in a unified Italy in 1861.
    The website below provides a timeline of events leading to Italian Unification. Much more about this monument and World War I on the Rome page Vittorio Emanuele travelogue. Admission to this museum is free for everyone.
    The controversy surrounding this monument began with the construction which destroyed a large area of the Capitoline Hill with a Medieval neighbourhood. Then, the monument itself is often regarded as pompous and too large. It is clearly visible to most of the city of Rome despite being boxy in general shape and lacking a dome or a tower. The monument is also glaringly white, making it highly conspicuous amidst the generally brownish buildings surrounding it, and its stacked, crowded nature has lent it several derogatory nicknames. Romans sometimes refer to the structure by a variety of irreverent slang expressions, such as "Zuppa Inglese", "the wedding cake", and "the false teeth", while Americans liberating Rome in 1944 labeled it "the typewriter", a nickname also adopted by the locals. Despite all this criticism, the monument still attracts a large number of visitors - Italian and tourists.

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    Vittoriano

    by traveloturc Updated Jun 28, 2009

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    vittoriano

    I ve read so many things about Victor Emmanuel at the university and when I visit for the first time Vittoriano in the Piazza venezia in other words the heart of Roma I was very much impressed from the building .Although many local people are not happy with the place and with the shape of the building ( wedding cake ,typwriter etc etc ) I think that Emmanuel reserved this special place .We have to admid that the unification of Italy is not easy thing specially if every italian has something to say )))Anway the building started in 1885 and was finished in 1911 and its still its renovated years and years.In 1921 the tomb of unknown soldier was placed .In his balconies you can feel the shadow of Mussolini adressing to the people.Today you can enjoy a traffic officer in the middle of the Piazza trying to conduct ( this is the right word) the tarffic jam with the same manner of Mussolini mimics ...

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    Mussolini Balcony

    by monica71 Written Feb 13, 2009

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    Benito Mussolini balcony
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    Palazzo Venezia is the building where you can see the the balcony from where Mussolini, "Il Duce" as he liked to be called, made his famous speeches from 1922 to 1943. In April 1945 he tried to escape to Switzerland, but he was captured and killed by Communist Italian partisans. His body was hung upside down at a gas station in Milan (as a proof of his death).

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    Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II

    by fdrich29 Updated Feb 12, 2009

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    Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II
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    This monument honoring Vittorio Emanuele II, the first king of unified Italy was begun in 1885 by Giuseppe Sacconi and completed in 1935. In 1925 the central part of the monument was opened, the Altare della Patria. The monument, also known as Il Vittoriano and "The Wedding Cake" is 443 feet wide and 230 feet high. It's located between Piazza Venezia and Capitoline Hill. Vittoriano offers a tremendous view of Rome. One of the more notable aspects of the monument is the Eternal Flame and Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, who's remains were chosen from World War I unidentified soldiers. The tomb is under constant watch by Roman Honor Guard. Hours in the winter are 9.30 - 16.30, summer 9.30 - 17.30 and admission is free.

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    Art Show

    by WheninRome Written Feb 10, 2009
    Picasso Exhibit

    In a city with so much art and architecture, one might think it odd to pay more money to see a special exhibit. We did just that paying about 10 euros apiece to see a special Picasso exhibit being held at the Museum of the Risorgimento building. It was quite impressive and is one of our favorite memories.

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    National Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II

    by monica71 Written Jan 29, 2009

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    Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II
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    This monument is also called "the typewriter"and it is dedicated to the first king of the united Italy, Vittorio Emanuele II. It was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1895 and it was inaugurated in 1911.

    Besides a huge sculpture of the king, fountains and two statues of the goddess Victoria riding on quadrigas, the monument also hosts the tomb of the Unknown Soldier. There are always fresh flowers here and an eternal flame.

    It is a nice place to visit for some great views of Rome and Piazza Venezia.

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    Victor Emmanuel Monument

    by WheninRome Written Jan 14, 2009

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    Victor Emmanuel Monument
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    I would consider the Victor Emmanuel Monument a "Don't Miss". Being right next to the Roman Forum makes it an easy sight to see. In my opinion the best feature of the Monument is the view from its rooftop. I thought it to be the absolute best and most beautiful view of Rome. We were there in late afternoon, but early morning or evening would be best. The Colosseum and Trajan's Column are beautiful from this rooftop.

    The equestrian statue within the center of the Monument is dedicated to Italy's first king and is the largest equestrian statue in the world. However, I was more impressed with the dual winged chariots that graced the top of the Monument and which are visible from surrounding neighborhoods.

    The Museum of the Risorgimento was free and interesting, but we didn't linger long. This museum details the unification of Italy.

    There was a temporary Picasso exhibit within a section of this Museum, which we paid admission to and spent a long time within.

    I would also recommend quickly visiting Mammertine Prison, which is right next to the Victor Emmanual Monument and easy to miss if you aren't looking for it. We popped in on the very short walk from the Forum to the Monument. It only takes a few minutes to visit.

    There is a restroom on the rooftop here, but there was at least a half hour wait in line. Instead, I found the restroom at the bottom floor of the Museum described below, which had no line.

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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    The big white cake of Rome

    by muratkorman Written Oct 5, 2008

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    This amazing monument reminds me of a big white cake. Just go up the stairs and you can see some nice panaromic view of Rome from left and right edges. The traffic in front of the square is always busy. Watch out while passing the road.

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    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument

    by stevemt Updated Sep 5, 2008

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    This imposing, HUGE monument in Rome is a monument to Vittorio Emanuele II, the first King of unified Italy.

    It is of white marble, and, (when I was there,) in pristine condition.

    Romans sometimes refer to the structure by a variety of irreverent slang expressions, such as "Zuppa Inglese", "the wedding cake", and "the false teeth", while Americans liberating Rome in 1944 labeled it "the typewriter".

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    Vittoriano - Renovation works.

    by breughel Updated Apr 7, 2008

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    Vittoriano - renovation works.
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    One of the most photographed monuments of Rome (see the number of pics here on VT) is undergoing restoration works. The central part of the frontage is covered with a sheet.

    For how long? Non lo so!

    Photographers will be disappointed but the two monumental chariots (Quadriga del Unita) in bronze with the winged Victory on the top of both corners at 81 m high and the colossal equestrian statue of King Victor Emmanuel II are not so bad for a pic.

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  • kmohandas's Profile Photo

    MONUMENT FOR VICTOR EMMANUEL

    by kmohandas Updated Feb 27, 2008

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    MONUMENT OF VITTORIO EMANUELE II

    This beautiful marble building located between Piazza Venezia and Capitoline hill was built to hounur the first king of unified Italy Victor Emmanuel II who died in 1878 at the age of 58. It was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1895. This monument was formally inagurated in 1911 and was completed in 1935.
    This monument houses huge marble pillars, fountains, beautiful sculptures and statue of Victor Emmanuuel. Thre is a statue of Goddess Victoria riding Quadriga on top of the building. The structure is 135 mtr. wide and 81 mtr. tall.
    This building stands amidst many ancient monuments as something different from the rest.

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