Piazza Venezia - Vittoriano, Rome

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  • Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    by zadunajska8
  • Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    by zadunajska8
  • Altare della Patria. - Vittoriano.
    Altare della Patria. - Vittoriano.
    by breughel
  • tompt's Profile Photo

    Monument for Victor Emanuel

    by tompt Written Jan 26, 2004

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    monument for Victor Emanuel II

    This monument is known as Il Vittoriano. Building started in 1885 and was finished in 1911. It is in honor of Victor Emanuel II, the first king of the united Italy. The king is depicted on a horse in front of the monument. The building is made of white marble from Brescia.
    Inside the monument you will find the museum Risorgimento, about events leading to the uniting of Italy. The entrance to this museum is free.

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    Rome from the Sky

    by moacha Updated Jul 21, 2007

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    These photographs are the scenery from the roof of VITTORIANO. You go up the stairs of VITTORIANO to a terrace from Piazza Campidoglio, Then there is a lift.
    As it was recently complited,and is not seem to be well known . You can go to the roof by this lift.
    The charge is 7 euros and a child charge is half. There are no time restrictions.
    "Palazzo del Quitinale and Foro di Traiano","Colosseo and Foro Romano","The centr of the town and the Vatican" and " The unparalleled view of Tiber river and the M.te Gianicolo, etc.
    You can enjoy the panorama view of 360 degrees.
    Some telescopes are installed in the roof. this charge is free.
    I recommend you to seeing the unparalleled views of Rome from the Sky.

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    The Typewriter :-)

    by Polly74 Written Apr 11, 2004

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    Vittoriano

    This is a truly monumental structure, dominating the whole piazza, dedicated to king Vittorio Emanuele II, the first king of unified Italy. Officially known as the Altar of the Fatherland, it was constructed between 1885 and 1905 and changed the whole appearance of the area with its bulk. For all its mass the monument is looked on with ambivalence by many Romans: for some it looks like a wedding cake; for others a typewriter. One doesn't come away from it without an opinion... mine is definitely the TYPEWRITER! The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is also now housed in this structure, incorporated in 1921.Strange to find it surrounded by ancient roman rest...but don't stay in Rome without having a glance to it!
    Inside there is a Museo del Risorgimento, very well organized, that explains in a good way a big part of the Italian history.

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  • freddie18's Profile Photo

    King Vittorio Emmanuele II

    by freddie18 Updated Aug 28, 2006

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    Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II: The first king of Italy. The monument is 135m or 440ft long by 130m or 425ft deep and as high as 70m or 230ft.

    It was my first time in April 2006 to see this monument. It's amazing! It's no wonder that this was built for twenty six years as it is huge and detailed. Due to time constraint, I did not have the chance to go inside the monument, but I can assure you that this monument is one of a kind. It houses the tomb of the unknown soldiers and the collection of stuff of Italian theme.

    A lot has been said about the monument, its controversial nature, called with different names because of its shape, but I believe it is important to note that when you start ascending the many steps going to the top or to the base of the monument, you have to think of one thing. Should I sit on the steps once I get tired? I should warn you, DON'T! If you insist to know why, then you may continue reading my Danger & Warning tips. Have fun!

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  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Monument to Victor Emmanuel II

    by ruki Written Aug 8, 2005

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    This impresive and divine white complex was built between 1885 and 1921 to celebrate the unification of Italy. There are the impressive staircase rises to the top Altar of the Fatherland with the statue of the goddess Roma at the center. Two lateral stairs lead on the fallen of the 12 m high statue of the King Victor Emmanuel II. I was astonish..

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Piazza Venezia and the "Wedding Cake"

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 6, 2004

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    The Wedding Cake

    At the end of Via del Corso lies Piazza Venezia. At its southern end lies a massive structure, whihc is the building constructed to praise king Vittorio Emmanuele II, the first king of unified Italy. Officially known as the Altar of the Fatherland, it was constructed between 1885 and 1905. I found out that it sometimes goes by another name to the locals: the "Wedding Cake", because of its square lines and bland appearance. Most Romans hate it, some like it, but both will let you know where they stand.

    Also, of importance is that the structure contains the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

    There are always guards around, and many times there are guys dressed up as gladiators trying to get you to pay them for a picture. Additonally, there are many, many food stalls here, and on the walk to the Coloseum.

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  • sylvie-uk's Profile Photo

    Vittorio Emanuele 2

    by sylvie-uk Updated Aug 17, 2004

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    vittorio emanuele 2

    Vittorio Emanuele 2, drawn by Sacconi in 1885, was erected to celebrate the italian independance.
    Charadia scluptor worked for 20 years on the equestrian sculpture of the king which was finished after his death by Galori.
    The bas-reliefs represent the principal towns of Italy. they were drawn by Maccagnagni, who worked closely with Sacconi.

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    Tomb of the unknown Soldier

    by Webboy Updated Jun 16, 2004

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    The tomb is under constant guard by armed soldiers

    The tomb of the unknown soldier can be found at the 'Vittirrio Emanuelle Monument', on the south side of Piazza Venzia.

    Housed on the front of the impressive Emanuelle Monument, the tomb is under permanent guard by 2 soldiers.

    The rules to visit the tomb are very strict, even as far as telling you that it is absolutely forbidden to dirty the tomb.......so make sure you have cleaned any chocolate off of your hands!

    You can't actually see the tomb itself, but what covers it is impressive: 2 guards with guns, 2 constantly lit flames, tons of Marble, and a statue which is several meters high, which itself sits on a marble podium which is also several meters high.

    A worth while visit, if only just to stand in awe of how resepected this monument is by the locals.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II

    by MM212 Updated Apr 13, 2007

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    Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II (Mar 07)
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    This grand neo-classical monument was built in the late 19th century to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the unification of Italy. A statue of King Vittorio Emanuele II on a horse stands in the centre of the structure. The monument dominates the busy Piazza Venezia just north of Monte Capitolino, one of Rome's seven hills.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    palazzo venezia

    by doug48 Updated Jul 26, 2006

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    palazzo venezia

    palazzo venezia was built for venetian cardinal pietro barbo, who later became pope paul II. it was at a time a papal residence and the venetian embassy to rome. after the fall of venice to napoleon, it was turned over to the french in 1797. during the facist era it was mussolini's office. the enlarged window and balcony in the center of the building was modified by mussolini for his speeches. closed mondays.

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Monumento Vittorio Emanuele II

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 13, 2006

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    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
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    This monument was begun in 1885 and inaugurated in 1911, to celebrate the unity of the nation. Italy had been a series of principalities governed long governed by rich families who had their own armies. Vittorio Emanuele was the person responsible for unifying modern Italy into one nation.
    It is a huge monument and stands out on the city skyline. Since 1921 the monument has housed the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

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  • IIGUANA's Profile Photo

    The start of all

    by IIGUANA Written Feb 21, 2005

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    Piazza Venezia from above

    Piazza Venezia is the best place to start any tour around Rome.
    The central point of this piazza is definately the monument to Vittorio Emanuelle II, which can be seen almost everywhere from Rome.
    The most important avenues converge to this piazza: Via del Corso, Via Quattro Novembre, Via del Plebiscito and Via dei Fiori Imperiali, which goes along the roman forum until the Coliseum.
    The Palazio Venezia next to the square was constructed in 1455 by LEon BAttista Alberti by orders of cardenal Pietro Barbo, who was later Pope Paul II. It's been considered one of the first Renaisance constructions. It is now a museum which has important medieval and Reinasance paintings and sculptures by Bellini, Gozzolo, Sansovino, Alemanno, Reni and Giorgione.

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  • ruki's Profile Photo

    PALAZZO VENEZIA

    by ruki Written Aug 8, 2005

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    It is one of the main square in the Rome where allmost all buses cycle. You can see many roman atractions here from Piazza del Campidoglio, the Capitoline Museum, Church of Santa Maria in Aracoeli, Church of the San Marco, Monument to Victor Emmanuel II....and others

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Piazza Venezia & Vitorio Emanuele Monument

    by mindcrime Written Mar 20, 2011

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    Piazza Venezia
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    Walking all the way to the end of Via dei Fori and just north of Capitoline Hill we came across with Piazza Venezia. I don’t know why but I was expecting to see an impressive square but it turned out to be just a busy traffic intersection (via del Corse is one of the main roads that pass from here).

    Pic 1 shows piazza Venezia with the Palazzo Venezia to the left which was built at the end of 15th century. It was used first as the residence of the cardinals that appointed to the church of San Marco (also located on the square) but later it turned into a residential papal palace. It belonged for a long period to Venice(1594-1797) after that it Austria used it as an embassy and much later Mussolini as his official residence. In our days it houses the Venezia Museum(It is open Tuesday to Sunday 9.00-14.00 but we didn’t visit it)

    Of course the square is dominated of a huge monument which is of course Vittorio Emanuelle II monument (pics 2-3) a huge structure that was built at the end of 19th century to commemorate the first king of united Italy which was Victor Emmanuel II.

    The memorial is 135metres long and 70metres high with monumental fountains and numerous statues on it(the big one is the largest in Rome and shows Victor Emmanuel of course). In the middle you can see the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with the eternal flame guarded by soldiers as expected. There’s a lift that will take you up to top but we didn’t go up because we were on the streets all day so we preferred to give the money (there’s a fee for the lift) to a near by café where we enjoyed a hot chocolate.

    We have to return some day though because the monument also houses the Museum of Italian Independence and Museum of Flags. It’s open daily from 10.00am and there’s no entrance fee.

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  • monica71's Profile Photo

    National Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II

    by monica71 Written Jan 29, 2009

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    Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II
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    This monument is also called "the typewriter"and it is dedicated to the first king of the united Italy, Vittorio Emanuele II. It was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1895 and it was inaugurated in 1911.

    Besides a huge sculpture of the king, fountains and two statues of the goddess Victoria riding on quadrigas, the monument also hosts the tomb of the Unknown Soldier. There are always fresh flowers here and an eternal flame.

    It is a nice place to visit for some great views of Rome and Piazza Venezia.

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