Piazza Venezia - Vittoriano, Rome

4.5 out of 5 stars 188 Reviews

Piazza Venezia, Rome, Italy +39 06 0608

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    by zadunajska8
  • Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    Vittorio Emanuele II Monument
    by zadunajska8
  • Trajan's column in front of the piazza's churches
    Trajan's column in front of the piazza's...
    by Jefie
  • ruki's Profile Photo

    PALAZZO VENEZIA

    by ruki Written Aug 8, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is one of the main square in the Rome where allmost all buses cycle. You can see many roman atractions here from Piazza del Campidoglio, the Capitoline Museum, Church of Santa Maria in Aracoeli, Church of the San Marco, Monument to Victor Emmanuel II....and others

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • jungles's Profile Photo

    The Wedding Cake

    by jungles Written Jun 11, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Love it or hate it, you sure can't miss this huge white monument in the centre of Rome's busiest piazza. Though many tourists are awed by it, most of the locals actually can't stand it. Why? A few reasons:

    1) It's not that old compared to its surroundings (it wasn't completed until 1911), and many older structures were destroyed in order to erect it here.

    2) It is considered by many to be rather gawdy and garish, and the bright white of its marble clashes with the mellow brown tones of the buildings nearby

    3) It completely obstructs the view of the Roman Forum and the Capitoline Hill

    4) It honours the Savoy dynasty, the same royal family who helped Mussolini come to power and who were forced into exile after World War II

    5) For all the expense and demolition of historic buildings that took place in order to build it, it serves no real purpose. While many people assume it's a palace of some sort, it's actually a mostly empty monument, with nothing but a lacklustre military museum inside (in my opinion it's the worst museum in Rome).

    5) Many people connect it with Mussolini as well; one of its nicknames is 'The Typewriter' because Mussolini used to stage huge military parades in which his fascist troops, dressed all in black, marched up and down the steps of the white monument, and with the clicking of their shoes it looked and sounded like a typewriter.

    The more common nickname for it is 'The Wedding Cake,' for obvious reasons. The official name is The Vittoriano, as it is a monument to King Vittorio Emmanuele II, the first king of unified Italy.

    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I lies here, and the eternal flame burns next to it. It is guarded at all times by two uniformed soldiers who stand perfectly still for hours on end; if you pass by around 9pm you may see the changing of the guard take place.

    The Vittoriano
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Callavetta's Profile Photo

    Victor Emmanual Monument

    by Callavetta Updated May 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This enormous monument, originally honoring the first King of Italy, took 26 years to build. Later dubbed the "wedding cake" or the "typewriter", climb the many many steps for great views of Rome. On one of the busiest intersections in the City, you may feel you're taking your life in your hands crossing the street. See my updated comments for crossing the street in "warnings and dangers".

    The Wedding Cake

    Was this review helpful?

  • IIGUANA's Profile Photo

    Il Vittoriano

    by IIGUANA Written Feb 21, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This huge monument on the Piazza Venezia was designed by Sacconi and constructed to conmemorate the unification of Italy. It took 40 years to build it, from 1885 to 1925. It holds the tomb of the unknown soldier and it shows how magnificent Italy can be.
    Now every roman hates it, as it doesn't fit with the architecture surrounding it. It's huge, it's imponent, but it's not very pretty. But it's there, so visit it. And climb it, as you'll have great views of Rome from the top.

    Il Vittoriano
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • engitalunion's Profile Photo

    Piazza Venezia

    by engitalunion Written Sep 17, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A good central point .Of particular interest and one of our favourites was Il Vittoriano.
    A huge monument to the First King of Italy and also where a 24 hr guard and eternal flames are situated near to the tomb of the "Unknown soldier".
    Amazing views of most of central Rome from the rooftop which also has a [ unpublicised ] cafe /bar . A MUST .

    Get to the roof

    Was this review helpful?

  • eksvist's Profile Photo

    Monument to Vittorio Emanuele II

    by eksvist Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monument to Vittorio Emanuele II - Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II or Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland) or Il Vittoriano is a monument to honour Victor Emmanuel, the first king of a unified Italy.
    It occupies a site between the Piazza Venezia and the Capitoline Hill. The monument was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1895. It was inaugurated in 1911 and completed in 1935.

    The monument is built of pure white marble from Botticino, Brescia, and features majestic stairways, tall Corinthian columns, fountains, a huge equestrian sculpture of Victor Emmanuel and two statues of the goddess Victoria riding on quadrigas.
    The structure is 135 m wide and 70 m high. If the quadrigae and winged victories are included, the height is to 81 m.

    The monument was controversial since its construction destroyed a large area of the Capitoline Hill with a Medieval neighbourhood for its sake.
    The monument itself is often regarded as pompous and too large.

    The base of the structure houses the museum of Italian Reunification.

    The monument holds the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with an eternal flame, built under the statue of Italy after World War I following an idea of General Giulio Douhet. The body of the unknown soldier was chosen from amongst 11 unknown remains by Maria Bergamas of Gradisca D' Isonzo whose only child was killed during World War I and whose body was never recovered. The selected unknown was transferred from Aquileia, where the ceremony with Bergamas took place to Rome in late October to early November of 1921.

    The Romans are saying that this monument is the ugliest building in Rome and maybe in all Italy, it is like wedding cake. I don't agree with them. For me as for tourist it is pompous and great building. And it is look much better at night ...

    Il Vittoriano in the dark Il Vittoriano the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the The Tyrrhenian Fountain Il Vittoriano at night

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    "Altare della Patria".

    by breughel Written Dec 25, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The lower part of the Vittoriano monument with access by a stair case from Piazza Venezia is the "Altare della Patria" i.e. the grave of an unknown soldier from WW I. The body of the Unknown Soldier was chosen on 26 October 1921 from among 11 unknown remains by Maria Bergamas whose only child was killed during World War I. Her son's body was never recovered.
    Above stands the colossal equestrian statue of King Victor Emmanuel II.
    The flame is guarded by two soldiers called "il Picchetto d'Onore" (Guard of honnor).
    Visitors should be aware that sitting or picnicking on the stairs in front of this patriotic monument is prohibited as well as familiarities with the guards (they are not Mickey's from Disneyland!).

    One of my visits happened on a day with heavy rain showers so that the two guards were wearing a camouflage poncho protecting them partially from the rain. They were keeping a lance in the hand and wearing a black beret so that I supposed they were Lancers from an armored regiment. It has been a military custom in W. Europe after WW I to have Cavalry becoming armored forces and often wearing a black beret which started I think in the UK.

    I asked a third soldier who makes rounds of inspection to what regiment the Picchetto d'Onore belonged and he answered "Lancieri di Montebello" and added "Granatieri" and showed very proudly his shoulder badge with the emblem with four heads of blindfolded black men (testa di moro bendata) and the grenade which belongs to the "Granatieri (Grenadiers) di Sardegna" an elite Italian infantry regiment that goes back to 1852.
    What left me puzzled because I didn't understand why Lancers did wear the badge of the Grenadiers? That soldier spoke only Italian so that it was after some search that I found out that these Lancers of Montebello standing there in the rain belonged to the Mechanized Brigade of the Sardinian Grenadiers - Brigata "Granatieri di Sardegna" (garrison Rome) made up of the 1st Regiment "Granatieri di Sardegna", the armored Regiment "Lancieri di Montebello" and the Regiment of Artiglieria terrestre "Acqui".

    Has this review any interest for the "lambda tourist"? Probably less than the fact that the City of Rome has chased away from the Colosseo the centurions and other antic roman legionnaires who were earning, according to them, 50 - 100 €/day from tourists having a photo token with them.
    Photos in front of the Pichetto d'Onore with elite soldiers are still free.

    Altare della Patria. - Vittoriano. On guard in the sky. Badge of
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • monica71's Profile Photo

    National Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II

    by monica71 Written Jan 29, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This monument is also called "the typewriter"and it is dedicated to the first king of the united Italy, Vittorio Emanuele II. It was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1895 and it was inaugurated in 1911.

    Besides a huge sculpture of the king, fountains and two statues of the goddess Victoria riding on quadrigas, the monument also hosts the tomb of the Unknown Soldier. There are always fresh flowers here and an eternal flame.

    It is a nice place to visit for some great views of Rome and Piazza Venezia.

    Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II view from the highest point of the monument tomb of the Unknown Soldier monument close up
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    Victor Emmanuel Monument

    by WheninRome Written Jan 14, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I would consider the Victor Emmanuel Monument a "Don't Miss". Being right next to the Roman Forum makes it an easy sight to see. In my opinion the best feature of the Monument is the view from its rooftop. I thought it to be the absolute best and most beautiful view of Rome. We were there in late afternoon, but early morning or evening would be best. The Colosseum and Trajan's Column are beautiful from this rooftop.

    The equestrian statue within the center of the Monument is dedicated to Italy's first king and is the largest equestrian statue in the world. However, I was more impressed with the dual winged chariots that graced the top of the Monument and which are visible from surrounding neighborhoods.

    The Museum of the Risorgimento was free and interesting, but we didn't linger long. This museum details the unification of Italy.

    There was a temporary Picasso exhibit within a section of this Museum, which we paid admission to and spent a long time within.

    I would also recommend quickly visiting Mammertine Prison, which is right next to the Victor Emmanual Monument and easy to miss if you aren't looking for it. We popped in on the very short walk from the Forum to the Monument. It only takes a few minutes to visit.

    There is a restroom on the rooftop here, but there was at least a half hour wait in line. Instead, I found the restroom at the bottom floor of the Museum described below, which had no line.

    Victor Emmanuel Monument View From Atop Victor Emmanuel Monument View From Atop Victor Emmanuel Monument Statue of Italy's First King Colosseum From Atop Victor Emmanuel Monument
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • tinyvulture's Profile Photo

    Vittorio Emanuele Monument

    by tinyvulture Updated May 29, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Vittorio Emanuele monument overlooks Piazza Venezia. He was the king who united Italy for the first time in the 1860s. The 19th century monument is a stark contrast from the older, smaller peach and gold colored buildings that surround it; it is a huge, gleaming white mountain, visible and recognizable from anywhere in Rome.

    Vittorio Emmanuele monument
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Vittoriano

    by von.otter Updated Sep 27, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    “On the Capitoline Hill, which recalls the glories of Ancient Rome, the Italians inaugurate a monument to the father of the country which typifies the struggles, the sacrifices, martyrdoms, and heroism which made the Italian resurrection possible.”
    — Italian Prime Minister Giovanni Giolitti (1842-1928)

    Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II (National Monument to Victor Emmanuel II) honors Victor Emmanuel II, the first king of a united Italy. It faces Piazza Venezia and backs on to the Capitoline Hill. Designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1895 artists from throughout Italy contributed sculpture other works of art for it. In 1911, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the new kingdom, the new symbol of a united Italy was inaugurated; one millions spectators witnessed the dedication. The monument was finally completed in 1935 at a cost of $20,000,000.

    At the center of the monument is the 40-foot-long, 40-foot high bronze equestrian sculpture of Vittorio Emanuele II created by Enrico Chiaradia. Rome’s largest statue had to be cast in 13 parts. The 13-foot long sword weighs 700 pounds; the horse weighs 4,000 pounds; the king’s pistol holders are over six feet long; and the head and helmet of Vittorio Emanuele weigh more than two tons.

    From the very beginning the monument was controversial, in part because its construction destroyed a Medieval neighborhood at the foot of the Capitoline Hill. The monument is thought to be pompous and oversized. Because it is built from such pure white marble from Botticino, Brescia, Vittoriano sticks out amidst its neighboring reddish-brownish buildings.

    Also known as Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland) it has acquired a number of unflattering nicknames. Romans refer to the building by such irreverent slang expressions as Zuppa Inglese (English soup), the wedding cake, and the false teeth. When American servicemen liberated Rome in 1944 they labeled it the typewriter, a nickname also adopted by the locals. Former Italian President Carlo Azeglio Ciampi pushed for il Vittoriano to be opened to the public as a vantage point over the Eternal City. A museum of military paraphernalia is housed within its walls.

    The monument shelters the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with an eternal flame, built under the gilded figure of Italy after World War I (see von.otter’s Rome Local Customs Tip “Changing of the Guard at the Tomb of the Unknown”).

    Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, May 2007 Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, May 2007 Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, May 2007 Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, May 2007 Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, May 2007
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Sunday Concert

    by Mikebb Written Apr 11, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We walked down to the Monumeento Vittorio Emanuele in Piazza Venezia and whilst walking around the Piazza we came upon an orchestra playing to the crowd. As it was very warm we decided to take a rest and drink and listen to the music. It was Sunday lunch time and there were many local families in the Piazza enjoying the music and other entertainment.

    Orchestra entertaining Sunday Crowds
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Blatherwick's Profile Photo

    Altare della Patria (Typewriter/Wedding Cake)

    by Blatherwick Updated Dec 29, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The true hub of the city. This gleaming white marble structure dominates the Piazza Venezia. It is officially known as the Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland) but is often referred to by locals as the "Wedding Cake" or the "Typewriter". It is a memorial to King Vittorio Emanuele II of the House of Savoia (under whom Italy was first united) begun in 1885, the day after his death. The eternal flame at the top of the steps is guarded night and day by two members of the armed forces. Behind it is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and above is an impressive equestrian bronze of the man of honor. Brave the many stairs for an excellent view of the city, and a close look at all sorts of 19th-century allegorical reliefs.

    Off to the left behind the monument is the Risorgimento Museum which is dedicated to the nationalist movement that brought about the "resurgeance" of the Italian movement which led to the unification of Italy in 1861 with the welding together of many little states under the House of Savoy.

    Altare della Patria
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • martin_nl's Profile Photo

    Il Vittoriano

    by martin_nl Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Without a doubt the most dominant building on Piazza Venezia and maybe even of the whole city is Il Vittoriano. This massive building is a monument to Vittorio Emanuele II, who was the first king of united Italy. There is a big (12 m long) statue of him on a horse right in the centre.

    Housed in the building is the Risorgimento Museum, that shows all the events that eventually led to this united Italy. There is also a spectacular view from the balcony. The locals refer to Il Vittoriano with words such as typewriter or weddingcake, for it is so huge and not very loved.

    Open: Tue-Sun 9:00-17:00
    The balcony however closes somewhat earlier.

    Il Vittoriano
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • AlexDJ's Profile Photo

    Piazza Venezia

    by AlexDJ Written Apr 8, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This large square has seen a lot of transformation and a lot of events passing on its sole.
    The enormous building that dominates Piazza Venezia is named "Altare della Patria" in english "the Altar of Native Country". It is built completely with marble, in the middle of which different bronze statues and bas-reliefs stand out. At its foot in 1921 the grave of the Milite Ignoto ("unknown soldier") was placed, in memory of the Italian soldiers who died during the First World War.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Rome

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

57 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Piazza Venezia - Vittoriano
4.5 out of 5 stars
0 miles away
Show Prices
Show Prices
5.0 out of 5 stars
0 miles away
Show Prices

View all Rome hotels