Piazza di Spagna - Spanish Steps, Rome

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Piazza di Spagna

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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    Spanish Steps

    by tim07 Written Aug 30, 2009

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    The steps were designed by Italian architect Francesco de Sanctis & completed in the 1720's. They were built to link the church Trinita dei Monti & the Piazza di Spagna.

    Today the steps with their terraces create a spectacular much photographed city landmark. They were busy both day & night with people sitting & taking in the views.

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    Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti

    by MM212 Updated Aug 1, 2009

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    The Spanish Steps (Jan 2005)
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    In the 17th century, the French owners of la Chiesa della Trinità dei Monti, the church towering above the Spanish Steps, decided to provide access from their church to Piazza di Spagna further down the hill. As a result, they created the elegant Spanish Steps, better known as la Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti, that have become an important landmark and Rome's favourite outdoor gathering place. As part of experiencing Rome, one must visit the steps on a sunny day, sit on one of the steps and take the time to observe everything and everyone around. A gelato in hand only enhances the experience!

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    Piazza Trinità dei Monti

    by MM212 Updated Aug 1, 2009

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    Roman Obelisk
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    Named after the recognisable twin towered church, Trinità dei Monti, this small piazza is a balcony over Rome, graced by one of the best views of the Eternal City. It is located at the top of la Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti (known in English as the Spanish Steps), overlooking Piazza di Spagna and Via Condotti, and has views extending all the way to the Vatican and St Peter's. Yet another obelisk is mounted in the centre of the piazza, but this one was in fact carved by Ancient Romans as a replica of Ancient Egyptian obelisks. Going up the Spanish Steps to this piazza is highly recommended at least for its views , especially at sunset (see photos).

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  • roamer61's Profile Photo

    Spanish Steps

    by roamer61 Updated May 3, 2009

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    One of the best known landmarks in the city, the Spanish Steps were desihned and built in the early 18th Century by Francesco de Sanctis. The steps are a series for terraced stairs lines by flowers and are a popular gathering place. Today, they still are a popular gathering place, for both locals and tourists alike.

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    Nice quick stop on a rainy day

    by monica71 Updated Mar 2, 2009

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    sign on the wall
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    It was raining hard at times when we visited the Spanish Steps, therefore our stop here was short. We climbed the stairs, admired the view, took few pictures of the area and of the Sinking Boat fountain by Bernini and moved on.

    I am pretty sure that during a nice and sunny day this is a great spot in Rome for relaxing and doing some window shopping on Via Condotti, but for us it was just a quick stop before moving on to Piazza del Popolo.

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    Spring has sprung

    by travelgourmet Updated Jan 28, 2009

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    BELLA!!!

    See Rome and die. Wow! See the Piazza di Spagna and the Scalinata di Trinita dei Monti (Spanish Steps) in spring (May) and sigh. The blossoms (Azalea boxed plants) take over the steps from top to bottom. It is a sight to behold. Mother Nature showing off.

    A must see for all tourists, from the top of the steps, at the Church of Trinta dei Monti, the view is of Rome. Walk a little at the top to the right and back a couple of blocks and the Via Veneto (La dolce Vita fame) is before you to walk down. Straight in front of you, at the bottom of the steps is the Bernini fountain, Fontana della Barcaccia (Fountain of the Old Boat). Remember not to eat or drink on the steps themselves. It is against the law. Past the fountain of Bernini is one of the most expensive streets in all of Roma. Why? It is the boutique street of Roma. Designer labels fill the area on and around Via Condotti. The entire area is Bella.

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  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Spanish Steps

    by marielexoteria Updated Dec 21, 2008

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    The Spanish Steps
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    This is one of the must visit sights in Rome. Sit down in one of the steps and enjoy watching the people, the traffic and the scenery.

    At the top of the steps you will find the church Trinita dei Monti and at the end the Fontana della Barcaccia.

    I visited Rome the week before Christmas, so they had this gorgeous tree with lights that changed color. The tree was sponsored by the embassy of Belize and was called "The Light to Freedom", in honor to kidnapped victims.

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  • deebum25's Profile Photo

    Climbing the spanish Steps

    by deebum25 Updated Dec 9, 2008

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    Beautiful piece of architecture and a carnival like atmosphere with sketch artists and people selling wares. Also a nice place to sit and people watch if you don't mind the sun. Of course it is gross to see a McDonald's at the foot of the steps but shutter your eyes as you walk by it

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Spanish Steps ??

    by traveloturc Updated Nov 29, 2008

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    spanish steps

    First of all this steps has nothing to do with Spain.They are build and founded by French people in order to link The Trinita Church uphill (build by Louis XII for some people in 1502 for some in 1495 to celebrate his invasion of Naples) to the Spanish Plaza...What s the relation with spanish ..because Spanish Ambassador to the Holy See had his embassy here. The square, at that time, was considered Spanish territory.The square and the church is linked by the monumental Spanish steps, built between 1723-1726 designed by Francesco de Sanctis. This steps are always populated and I presume because this is an ideal place to take pictures for the groups due to physical situations of the steps.

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  • Turska's Profile Photo

    Spanish steps by night

    by Turska Written Oct 11, 2008

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    People listening free concert
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    If you have enough time,you should visit most of monuments also at nigt-time,they look great at night-lightning.If you are at town in July or August,you might find yourself in free concert,like we did at Spanish steps.I have a short video of there at my Rome-page.Even if the music wasn´t that kind we use to listen,it was perfect to hot Roman summer night!

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    Lounge or Path to Another Level

    by Susumarie Written Oct 3, 2008

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    Fountain at Piazza di Spagna
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    We stumbled on the Spanish Steps accidentally in one of our many "where are we now" states -- maybe one of the better ways to explore new places! Coming across the fountain at the base of the steps, we stopped to rest (my daughter is sure our European trip was really Fat Camp, due to all our hiking and climbing) we set our eyes on the stairs and discussed whether we should hike them and see what was up there. Being the adventurous sort, we did. At the top (we survived the climb), we decided it looked more appealing to head to the left (which was uphill, of course), so we continued our exploration. This eventually got us to a point that gave us quite a view of St. Peter's, and then we ended up at Villa Borghese, the largest public park in Rome, which was quite beautiful, and gave us a nice place to stroll, just a pleasant afternoon. All of this was by accident.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Piazza di Spagna

    by traveloturc Updated Sep 25, 2008

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    monument for pope Leo X

    It was Pope Leo X build 3 roads leading the south.Via del Babuino and via condotti with his expensive shops are joining piazza Spagna.There is a monument in the middle of the piazza to comemmorate the Pope..

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Piazza di Spagna

    by mallyak Updated Aug 27, 2008

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    This beautiful piazza has been the destination of foreigners to Rome for centuries: most came as pilgrims and arrived in the north part of the city before finding lodgings. It was Pope Leo X who, from Piazza del Popolo (the first piazza inside the walls of Rome coming from the north), constructed the three roads leading south in the form of a trident across the Campo Marzio. The easternmost is Via del Babuino, Baboon Street(!), that leads directly to Piazza di Spagna.
    At the bottom of the Spanish Steps is the Piazza di Spagna or Spanish square. The long, triangular square is named after the Spanish Embassy to the Holy See. In the 17th century, the area around the embassy was even considered Spanish territory.
    The area around Piazza di Spagna is where to find the most prestigious boutiques such as Prada, Valentino, Gucci etc. It is an ideal starting point for your shopping in Rome.

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    The Spanish Steps (Italian: Scalinata della Trinit

    by mallyak Written Aug 27, 2008

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    A masterpiece of the XVIII century, the square, with its irregular shape, extends itself at the feet of Pincio hill; on top of it the French Church Trinita dei Monti (1502) is located.
    The square and the church are connected by the monumental Spanish steps, built between 1723-1726 (designed by Francesco de Sanctis).
    The Spanish steps, once a year in the summertime, host a famous fashion show, and they are used as a catwalk.

    On the square we find the Barcaccia Fountain, built in 1598 by order of the Pope Urbano VIII to commemorate the disastrous flood caused by Tevere river the very same year.

    The most glamorous Rome streets lead to Piazza di Spagna (via Condotti e via del Babuino).
    The area around Piazza di Spagna is where to find the most prestigious boutiques such as Prada, Valentino, Gucci etc. It is an ideal starting point for your shopping in Rome

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    What a contrast

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Aug 4, 2008

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    Behind the walls
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    How many times did we pass by the Spanish Steps during our week in Rome? and yet I find I only have one photo of them. Mid-June, and the classic Springtime scene of the steps lined with flowers has become just a mass of people, the flowers gone and, this year, scaffolding hiding the facade of the Chiesa di Santissima Trinità dei Monti - somehow the place just doesn't register with me enough to set the shutter finger going. Maybe if I was twenty? thirty? forty/? years younger.

    And yet, I bring home from Rome some lovely images in the mind's eye of a different aspect of this little corner of the city. The graceful calm of the cloister of the Trinità, a few quiet moments under the frescoed dome of the church, children playing in a shady garden oblivious of the view of Rome spread out below them. We'd come with a friend to collect her children from their school in the monastery by the church - another world from the crowds just the other side of the wall.

    The Trinità has long been a small French enclave in the heart of Rome. The church was built by the French King, Louis XII in 1502 to celebrate his success in the invasion of Naples and, with the agreement of the popes of the time, the church remained under French patronage for the next four hundred years. In the early 19th century it became the Mater church of the French Society of the Sacred Heart and, as such, is held dear by generations of those who were educated by this order around the world. Times change and in 2005 the church and its adacent monastery buildings were handed over to a new order, the Monastic Communities of Jerusalem (Fraternités Monastiques de Jérusalem) a congregation of monks, nuns and lay people with a vocation is to live “in the heart of the city, in the heart of God” . The French government are funding the restoration work that is currently being done and the new order have pledged their continuing commitment to welcome everyone who comes to this beautiful church.

    As for the steps themselves, they're very handsome. Reputedly the longest and widest flight of stairs in Europe, they were built in 1725 to link the Spanish Bourbon Embassy and the church at the top to the Holy See on the piazza below. Already the city's favourite place for hanging out and being seen, the addition of the steps to the piazza only added to its popularity - a popularity that continues to this day, with tourists and local lads and lasses cramming the steps at all hours of the day and night. You need to be up very early, or very late, if you want to see the staircase for itself alone.

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