Roman Forum - Arch of Titus, Rome

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  • Arco di Tito, The Entablature, Roma, May 2007
    Arco di Tito, The Entablature, Roma, May...
    by von.otter
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  • Roman Forum - Arch of Titus
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    Forum: Arch of Titus

    by brendareed Written Jun 2, 2014

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    This arch was erected in AD 81 in honor of Titus and Vespasian’s military victories in the Judean War. Titus’ brother Domitian ordered the monument built after Titus’ death. On the inside of the arch are worn reliefs showing the winged Victory and the goddess Roma and another showing the parade of war booty brought back from Jerusalem, in which you clearly see a Menorah and Solomon’s altar. You can get really close to the arch (unlike Constantine’s) and can appreciate the workmanship.

    The Arch of Titus is located at the Colosseum side of the Forum along the Via Sacra on the way up to Palatine Hill. It stands 15.4 meters (50 feet) high and is 13.5 meters (44 feet) wide. The arch was originally built using pentelic marble, but travertine was used during a later reconstruction of the arch making it easy to see where it has been restored.

    During the Middle Ages, the arch was actually incorporated into a family castle, but over several centuries this was dismantled and nowadays nothing is left of this home.

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    Arco di Titus

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    At the top of the Velia, in Via Sacra, we found the Arch of Titus which was built by the Senate after the Emperor's death. By this arch the Senate paid respect and honour to Emperor who conquested Jerusalem in 70 A.D. On the inside of the arch are two bas-reliefs, on each side, displaying the Emperor on his triumphal chariot and the procession of the Jewish prisoners carrying a seven branched candelabrum. It was habbit in Rome for the triumphal processions, the victorious emperor or general was followed by ranks of prisoners.

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    Foro Romano, Part VII: Arco di Tito, Part II

    by von.otter Written Feb 3, 2009

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    Arco di Tito, Foro Romano, Roma, May 2007
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    “The Senate and People of Rome (dedicate this) to the divine Titus Vespasianus Augustus, son of the divine Vespasian.”
    — The entablature’s inscription (see photo #4), in Roman capitals because lower-case letters had not been designed, on Arco di Tito; the letters were once made of silver or gold

    The Arch of Titus offers a valuable record of its time. Carved in its arch are the only contemporary images of the sacred items taken from the Temple in Jerusalem. The scene shows the triumphal procession with the booty (see photo #2) from the temple at Jerusalem—the sacred Menorah and the silver trumpets, used to call Jews to Rosh Hashanah. The bearers of the booty wear laurel crowns. These few figures are stand-ins for hundreds who participated the actual procession.

    Because the destruction of Jerusalem and the desecration of the Temple are illustrated on the Arch, many Jews refuse to walk beneath it, almost 2,000 years later. Today, because of the great number of tourists who visit the Forum, the archway is roped off, making walking through it a mute point. In 1948, the year Israel was founded, members of Rome’s Jewish community walked through the arch, but in the opposite direction from how Ancient Roman soldiers would have marched beneath it in triumph.

    The archway’s deeply coffered soffit is decorated with a relief, The Apotheosis of Titus (see photo #3), at its center. The arch was erected posthumously, after Titus had already been deified.

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    Arch of Titus

    by monica71 Written Jan 22, 2009

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    This is the oldest surviving arch in Rome and it has only one opening. It is very simple and just beautiful! I found it very interesting to hear that Napoleon liked this arch so much that he ordered his architects to reproduce this in Paris. The results of his orders are the Arc du Triomphe de Carrousel (a life-size imitation of the Arch of Septimius Severus) and the more famous Arc du Triomphe, which maintains the exact proportions of the Arch of Titus, though several times larger.

    The Arch of Titus was built at the order of Domitian to commemorate emperor Titus and his victory in Jerusalem. Titus died suddenly during a plague in 81 AD, only after 2 years of ruling Rome. The construction of the arch lasted 4 years.

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    ARCH OF TITUS

    by DAO Updated Apr 12, 2008

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    The Arch of Titus is an architectural, artistic and historical wonder. It was constructed by the emperor Domitian shortly after the death of his older brother Titus (born AD 41, emperor 79-81). It commemorates Titus’s capture and sacking of Jerusalem in 70 AD, which effectively terminated the Jewish War begun in 66 (complete victory was not achieved until the fall of Masada in 73).The Arch of Titus has provided the general model for triumphal arches erected across the world since the 16th century.

    Don’t just walk past this fantastic arch. The amazing thing is that this is built entirely of marble. Inside of the arch there are relief (raised) carvings showing the victory parade when Titus returned to Rome. On the outside are Roman soldiers carrying a huge menorah which they had taken from the Jerusalem. There is also the figure of Emperor Titus (whose head is missing now) rides in a chariot drawn by four horses.

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    Arco di Tito (Arch of Titus)

    by MM212 Updated Jun 1, 2007

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    Built in the 1st century AD, the Arch of Titus has served as a model for triumphal arches around the world. Emperor Domitian built it after the death of his brother Titus to commemorate the victory of the Roman Empire over Jerusalem. The arch is located within the Roman Forum on Via Sacra and had been badly damaged in the past. Extensive restoration work in recent history has made it whole again.

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    Arch of Titus

    by illumina Updated Aug 23, 2006

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    The Arch of Titus is a triumphal arch commemorating the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 AD and the triumphal procession they held in Rome in 71 AD. It is situated at the east entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, and is close to the Colosseum.

    The arch must have been erected sometimes after the death of Titus in 81 AD, as Titus is referred to as 'Divus' in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 AD, but may have been built later by Trajan.

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    arch of titus

    by doug48 Updated Jul 27, 2006

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    arch of titus

    this triumphal arch was erected in 81AD by emperor domitian in honor of his brother titus and his father vespasian in their victory over the jews in palistine. the jews, tired of roman rule revolted and after a two year war they were defeated. the romans sacked jerusalem and returned to rome with the treasures of the the temple.

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    Arch of Titus

    by jungles Updated May 27, 2006

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    This triumphal arch at the top of the Via Sacra was built to commemorate the sack of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. when the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and brought tens of thousands of Jews back to Rome as slaves, thus beginning the Jewish diaspora. The frieze on the left inside the arch (if you're facing the Colosseum) shows the general Titus, who later became emperor, riding triumphantly into Rome on his chariot, while the one on the right shows Roman soldiers carrying their spoils of victory, including the golden menorah from the temple.

    The arch was at one point incorporated into a medieval wall and had to be heavily restored in 1822. The sculptures on the inside of the arch, however, are the originals.

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  • Jenniflower's Profile Photo

    Tha Arch of Titus

    by Jenniflower Updated May 23, 2006

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    The Arch of Titus

    When you leave the Via Appia (Sacred Way) cobbled walkway, you pass the Arch of Titus to go into the Roman Forums.

    A stunning arch, it has quite a history and tells a story (as does so much in Rome!).

    Built in 81AD, it symolises victory over Jerusalem.

    The inscription on it says SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS DIVO TITO DIVI VESPASIANI F. VESPASIANO AVGVSTO in Latin, which translates to The Senate and People of Rome (dedicate this arch) to the divine Titus Vespasian Augustus, son of the divine Vespasian, in English.

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  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by Gili_S Written Apr 9, 2006

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    The arch of Titus builds after the Roman victorious over Judea in the year 70 AD. This arch contains stone image of the golden Menorah brought from the temple in Jerusalem to Rome. Some says it might be still hidden in the archives somewhere in the cellars of the Vatican, some convinced that it was melted and re cycled.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus - Arco di Tito

    by Airpunk Updated Mar 7, 2006

    The Arch of Titus was built after the victory of emperor Titus against the rebels in Judea dn the conquest of Jerusalem in the year 70 A.D. It is located on the highest point of the via Sacra, a street which was used by emperors and generals for parades. The arch shows scenes from the battles in Judea and several gods, including the goddess of victory, Victoria together with the emperor on a war chariot. The arch has a height of around 14,5 meters and was used as an example for the Arc de Triomphe in Paris.

    During the medieval ages, the arch was part of a fortress together with other buildings of the Forum Romanum and the Palatinum. The arch has been restored after 1822 and the medieval buildings were removed.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by Willettsworld Updated Jul 28, 2005

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    Built during the reign of Emperor Domitian between AD 81 and AD 96, the arch commemorates the sack of Jerusalem by his father Vespasian and brother Titus in AD 71. During the Middle Ages it was absorbed into the Frangipane fortresses and then brought back to its original shape in 1821 by Giuseppe Valedier.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by smschley Updated Mar 20, 2005

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    n 66 A.D. Jewish Zealots started a revolt against the Roman occupation of Judea. Titus captured Jerusalem in 70 A.D. with four legions. The last vestige of the Zealots fled to Masada causing the Roman to build a huge earth assault ramp to reach the top. Finally after 3 years the fortress was taken and the revolt was finally completely crushed.

    In 79 A.D. Titus became emperor but died just two years late. He was deified by the Roman Senate and his son, emperor Domitian built the Arch of Titus that same year both to honor his father and to commemorate his victory in the Jewish War. The arch was dedicated in 85 A.D. with pomp and ceremony.

    The 50 foot high arch is located at the Roman Forum, the arch stands close to the highest point of the Sacred Way (Sacra Via) which extends from here westwards to the Roman Forum. It is the oldest surviving example of a Roman arch.

    At the inside of the arch are two panels with reliefs. One depicts the triumphal procession with the spoils taken from the Second Temple in Jerusalem: the Menorah; the silver trumpets and the Arc of the Covenant. The other one shows Titus in a chariot accompanied by the Goddess Victoria and the Goddess Roma.

    The Latin writing on the top translates as: The Senate and People of Rome, to Divine Titus Vespasian Augustus, son of Divine Vespasian were originally in bronze. The reliefs were also colored and the arch was topped by a bronze a chariot drawn by four horses.

    The outside faces of the piers are nineteenth-century restorations undertaken as far back as 1821 after demolition of the fortification in which the arch had been incorporated in the Middle Ages. The outer sides were rebuilt in travertine instead of marble, so they would be distinguishable from the original.

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  • Julius_Caesar's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by Julius_Caesar Written Feb 3, 2005

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    This triumphal arch was erected in 81 A.D. by the Emperor Domitian (81-96 A.D.) in honour of the victories of his brother, Titus, and his father, Vespasian. The inscription says “SENATVS POPVLVSQVE ROMANVS DIVO TITO DIVI VESPASIANI F. VESPASIANO AVGVSTO”, which means “The Senate and People of Rome (dedicate this arch) to the divine Titus Vespasian Augustus, son of the divine Vespasian”. After Augustus, many emperors were deified (not Domitian though, who unlike his father and brother after his death was condemned to the “damnatio memoriae”, the “damnation of memory”).

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