Roman Forum - Arch of Titus, Rome

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  • Arco di Tito, The Entablature, Roma, May 2007
    Arco di Tito, The Entablature, Roma, May...
    by von.otter
  • Roman Forum - Arch of Titus
    by brendareed
  • Roman Forum - Arch of Titus
    by brendareed
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Tito's Arch

    by solopes Updated Apr 23, 2015

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    It's impossible to remember in detail the image and name of each monument lined in the forums, but, travelling with Tito, who could skip Tito's triumphal arch?

    Built by Domitian in 82 AD, it was the model to several triumphal arches, including the modern one in Paris.

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    Forum: Arch of Titus

    by brendareed Written Jun 2, 2014

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    This arch was erected in AD 81 in honor of Titus and Vespasian’s military victories in the Judean War. Titus’ brother Domitian ordered the monument built after Titus’ death. On the inside of the arch are worn reliefs showing the winged Victory and the goddess Roma and another showing the parade of war booty brought back from Jerusalem, in which you clearly see a Menorah and Solomon’s altar. You can get really close to the arch (unlike Constantine’s) and can appreciate the workmanship.

    The Arch of Titus is located at the Colosseum side of the Forum along the Via Sacra on the way up to Palatine Hill. It stands 15.4 meters (50 feet) high and is 13.5 meters (44 feet) wide. The arch was originally built using pentelic marble, but travertine was used during a later reconstruction of the arch making it easy to see where it has been restored.

    During the Middle Ages, the arch was actually incorporated into a family castle, but over several centuries this was dismantled and nowadays nothing is left of this home.

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    Arco di Titus

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    At the top of the Velia, in Via Sacra, we found the Arch of Titus which was built by the Senate after the Emperor's death. By this arch the Senate paid respect and honour to Emperor who conquested Jerusalem in 70 A.D. On the inside of the arch are two bas-reliefs, on each side, displaying the Emperor on his triumphal chariot and the procession of the Jewish prisoners carrying a seven branched candelabrum. It was habbit in Rome for the triumphal processions, the victorious emperor or general was followed by ranks of prisoners.

    Arco di Titus Arco di Titus - bas-relief bas-relief at the arch Arco di Titus at the top of Velia

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    Arco di Tito

    by Tijavi Updated Oct 9, 2009

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    Of all the monuments in the Forum, this is perhaps the one I'm most attached to - for very personal reasons - it's MY arch!

    Delusions of Roman grandeur aside, the arch, named after an emperor's brother (who was also emperor himself) in commemoration of Roman victory in the Roman-Jewish war (AD 66-73), is as stunning as it is iconic - it became the model for many triumphal arches since the 16th century, such as Paris' Arc de Triomphe, and the arch at Washington Park in New York.

    The more notable features of the arch include its vivid descriptions of holy Jewish articles such as the menorah and trumpets - within the context of the destruction of Jerusalem.

    Standing tall on Via Sacra The arch is dedicated to Emperor Titus The tablet showing the dedicatory inscription Details showing scenes from sack of Jerusalem
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    Foro Romano, Part VII: Arco di Tito, Part II

    by von.otter Written Feb 3, 2009

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    “The Senate and People of Rome (dedicate this) to the divine Titus Vespasianus Augustus, son of the divine Vespasian.”
    — The entablature’s inscription (see photo #4), in Roman capitals because lower-case letters had not been designed, on Arco di Tito; the letters were once made of silver or gold

    The Arch of Titus offers a valuable record of its time. Carved in its arch are the only contemporary images of the sacred items taken from the Temple in Jerusalem. The scene shows the triumphal procession with the booty (see photo #2) from the temple at Jerusalem—the sacred Menorah and the silver trumpets, used to call Jews to Rosh Hashanah. The bearers of the booty wear laurel crowns. These few figures are stand-ins for hundreds who participated the actual procession.

    Because the destruction of Jerusalem and the desecration of the Temple are illustrated on the Arch, many Jews refuse to walk beneath it, almost 2,000 years later. Today, because of the great number of tourists who visit the Forum, the archway is roped off, making walking through it a mute point. In 1948, the year Israel was founded, members of Rome’s Jewish community walked through the arch, but in the opposite direction from how Ancient Roman soldiers would have marched beneath it in triumph.

    The archway’s deeply coffered soffit is decorated with a relief, The Apotheosis of Titus (see photo #3), at its center. The arch was erected posthumously, after Titus had already been deified.

    Arco di Tito, Foro Romano, Roma, May 2007 Arco di Tito, Detail, Roma, May 2007 Arco di Tito, Detail, Roma, May 2007 Arco di Tito, The Entablature, Roma, May 2007
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    Foro Romano, Part VII: Arco di Tito, Part I

    by von.otter Updated Feb 3, 2009

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    “And when he drew near and saw the city he wept over it, saying, ‘Would that even today you knew the things that make for peace! But now they are hid from your eyes. For the days shall come upon you, when your enemies will cast up a bank about you and surround you, and hem you in on every side, and dash you to the ground, you and your children within you, and they will not leave one stone upon another in you; because you did not know the time of your visitation.’ ”
    — The Holy Gospel according to St. Luke, 19, 41-44; Jesus made a prophecy about the destruction of Jerusalem because the Israelites refused to receive him as a prophet and as the Servant of the Lord

    Built from Pentelic marble, the Arch of Titus, Arcus Titi in Latin, is a triumphal arch with a single arched opening. Located at the highest point of the Via Sacra within Foro Romano, it was constructed by Emperor Domitian shortly after the death of his older brother Titus (AD 41-81). Commemorating the capture and sack of Jerusalem in AD 70, bringing an end to the Jewish Wars which began in AD 66, the overall arch is 44 feet wide, 55.5 feet high, and 15.5 feet deep. The archway itself is 27 feet high and 17 wide. It’s one of three arches still standing in Rome; two of them are in the Forum.

    Because the arch was used as part of other buildings in later eras explains why it is so well preserved. The Frangipani family incorporated the arch into a fortress built in the 11th century; following that it was part of the Santa Maria Nova convent in the Middle Ages. It was one of the first buildings to undergo a modern restoration, starting with Raffaello Stern in 1817 and continued by Giuseppe Valadier under Pius VII in 1821, with new capitals and travertine masonry.

    Of Rome’s three remaining triumphal arches this is my favorite; its solid style of its two great piers makes a strong, definitive and authoritative statement. Arco di Tito has served as the model for triumphal arches built since the 16th century. Among those that drew inspiration from this arch are Napoleon for his Arc de Triomphe de l’Etoile in Paris and Stamford White for the Washington Square Arch in New York City’s Greenwich Village (see von.otter’s Travelogue, ‘Washington Square Arch’).

    Arco di Tito, Foro Romano, Roma, May 2007 Arco di Tito, Foro Romano, Roma, May 2007 Arco di Tito + von.otter, Roma, May 2007 Arco di Tito, Foro Romano, Roma, May 2007 Arco di Tito, Foro Romano, Roma, May 2007
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    Arch of Titus

    by monica71 Written Jan 22, 2009

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    This is the oldest surviving arch in Rome and it has only one opening. It is very simple and just beautiful! I found it very interesting to hear that Napoleon liked this arch so much that he ordered his architects to reproduce this in Paris. The results of his orders are the Arc du Triomphe de Carrousel (a life-size imitation of the Arch of Septimius Severus) and the more famous Arc du Triomphe, which maintains the exact proportions of the Arch of Titus, though several times larger.

    The Arch of Titus was built at the order of Domitian to commemorate emperor Titus and his victory in Jerusalem. Titus died suddenly during a plague in 81 AD, only after 2 years of ruling Rome. The construction of the arch lasted 4 years.

    Arch of Titus Arch of Titus - another view
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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Triumph I

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Aug 7, 2008

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    The four triumphal arches in the area of the Roman Forum stand as symbols of one of Rome's most important traditions - the triumph awarded to their greatest heroes on their return to Rome after a military victory over an major enemy. In Republican times, awarding such a triumph was the prerogative of the Senate and was the greatest honour that could be bestowed, bringing with it public accolades that raised the triumphator to almost god-like status. Following the fall of the Republic, the emperors seized the right to grant triumphs from the magistrates, and they became more celebrations of imperial wealth and status and the arches that were built to accompany them were not only dedicated to such military victories. Although all the arches at the Forum were built in this Imperial tradition, they do honour emperors who were noted for their military successes.

    The Arch of Titus is the oldest survivor. Built by the emperor Domitian in 81AD to honour his brother Titus' victories in the Jewish War that saw the sack of Jerusalem in 70AD, the reliefs of the inner surface of the arch portray vivdly the triumph awarded to Titus and his father Vespasian on their return to Rome, bringing with them the spoils of the war, including the menorah and other sacred items from Jerusalem's Temple, the only contemorary record of these precious artifacts in existence.

    Titus himself can be seen in the opposite panel and his deification is portrayed in the central panel of the coffered underside of the arch. The main inscription on the arch tells us that it is dedicated to the "divine Titus Vespasianus Augustus, son of the divine Vespasian."

    None of the outer reliefs survived the arch being used as part of a mediaeval defence system - the brilliantly white Travertine facings were placed on the arch when it was restored in 1821. An inscription on one side of the arch records this restoration.

    Whilst you can no longer walk through the arch, you can certainly get close enough to get a really good look at the sculptures on the inner surfaces.

    SENATVS POPVLVSQVE��ROMANVS .... The Arch of Titus The spoils of war Titus triumphant The apotheosis of Titus
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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    ARCH OF TITUS

    by DAO Updated Apr 12, 2008

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    The Arch of Titus is an architectural, artistic and historical wonder. It was constructed by the emperor Domitian shortly after the death of his older brother Titus (born AD 41, emperor 79-81). It commemorates Titus’s capture and sacking of Jerusalem in 70 AD, which effectively terminated the Jewish War begun in 66 (complete victory was not achieved until the fall of Masada in 73).The Arch of Titus has provided the general model for triumphal arches erected across the world since the 16th century.

    Don’t just walk past this fantastic arch. The amazing thing is that this is built entirely of marble. Inside of the arch there are relief (raised) carvings showing the victory parade when Titus returned to Rome. On the outside are Roman soldiers carrying a huge menorah which they had taken from the Jerusalem. There is also the figure of Emperor Titus (whose head is missing now) rides in a chariot drawn by four horses.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Arco di Tito (Arch of Titus)

    by MM212 Updated Jun 1, 2007

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    Built in the 1st century AD, the Arch of Titus has served as a model for triumphal arches around the world. Emperor Domitian built it after the death of his brother Titus to commemorate the victory of the Roman Empire over Jerusalem. The arch is located within the Roman Forum on Via Sacra and had been badly damaged in the past. Extensive restoration work in recent history has made it whole again.

    Arco di Tito Arch of Titus
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    A Farewell to Emperors

    by travelfrosch Updated Mar 24, 2007

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    "When they turn the pages of history
    When these days have passed long ago,
    Will they read of us with sadness
    At the seeds that we let grow...
    (when) We turned our gaze from the castles in the distance,
    Eyes cast down on the path of least resistance?"

    - Rush

    The Forum
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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Arco di Tito

    by Gypsystravels Updated Aug 23, 2006

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    Arco di Tito commemorates the destruction of Jerusalem and its sacred temple by Tittus in AD 70.

    It is said that unitl Israel was founded in 1948 and the return of Palestine became possible, pious Jews refused to walk under this arch.

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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by illumina Updated Aug 23, 2006

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    The Arch of Titus is a triumphal arch commemorating the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 AD and the triumphal procession they held in Rome in 71 AD. It is situated at the east entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, and is close to the Colosseum.

    The arch must have been erected sometimes after the death of Titus in 81 AD, as Titus is referred to as 'Divus' in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 AD, but may have been built later by Trajan.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    arch of titus

    by doug48 Updated Jul 27, 2006

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    this triumphal arch was erected in 81AD by emperor domitian in honor of his brother titus and his father vespasian in their victory over the jews in palistine. the jews, tired of roman rule revolted and after a two year war they were defeated. the romans sacked jerusalem and returned to rome with the treasures of the the temple.

    arch of titus
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  • jungles's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by jungles Updated May 27, 2006

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    This triumphal arch at the top of the Via Sacra was built to commemorate the sack of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. when the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and brought tens of thousands of Jews back to Rome as slaves, thus beginning the Jewish diaspora. The frieze on the left inside the arch (if you're facing the Colosseum) shows the general Titus, who later became emperor, riding triumphantly into Rome on his chariot, while the one on the right shows Roman soldiers carrying their spoils of victory, including the golden menorah from the temple.

    The arch was at one point incorporated into a medieval wall and had to be heavily restored in 1822. The sculptures on the inside of the arch, however, are the originals.

    Arch of Titus Close-up of the frieze inside the arch
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