Roman Forum - Arch of Titus, Rome

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  • Arco di Tito, The Entablature, Roma, May 2007
    Arco di Tito, The Entablature, Roma, May...
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  • Roman Forum - Arch of Titus
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  • Roman Forum - Arch of Titus
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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Triumph I

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Aug 7, 2008

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    The four triumphal arches in the area of the Roman Forum stand as symbols of one of Rome's most important traditions - the triumph awarded to their greatest heroes on their return to Rome after a military victory over an major enemy. In Republican times, awarding such a triumph was the prerogative of the Senate and was the greatest honour that could be bestowed, bringing with it public accolades that raised the triumphator to almost god-like status. Following the fall of the Republic, the emperors seized the right to grant triumphs from the magistrates, and they became more celebrations of imperial wealth and status and the arches that were built to accompany them were not only dedicated to such military victories. Although all the arches at the Forum were built in this Imperial tradition, they do honour emperors who were noted for their military successes.

    The Arch of Titus is the oldest survivor. Built by the emperor Domitian in 81AD to honour his brother Titus' victories in the Jewish War that saw the sack of Jerusalem in 70AD, the reliefs of the inner surface of the arch portray vivdly the triumph awarded to Titus and his father Vespasian on their return to Rome, bringing with them the spoils of the war, including the menorah and other sacred items from Jerusalem's Temple, the only contemorary record of these precious artifacts in existence.

    Titus himself can be seen in the opposite panel and his deification is portrayed in the central panel of the coffered underside of the arch. The main inscription on the arch tells us that it is dedicated to the "divine Titus Vespasianus Augustus, son of the divine Vespasian."

    None of the outer reliefs survived the arch being used as part of a mediaeval defence system - the brilliantly white Travertine facings were placed on the arch when it was restored in 1821. An inscription on one side of the arch records this restoration.

    Whilst you can no longer walk through the arch, you can certainly get close enough to get a really good look at the sculptures on the inner surfaces.

    SENATVS POPVLVSQVE��ROMANVS .... The Arch of Titus The spoils of war Titus triumphant The apotheosis of Titus
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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    arch of titus

    by doug48 Updated Jul 27, 2006

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    this triumphal arch was erected in 81AD by emperor domitian in honor of his brother titus and his father vespasian in their victory over the jews in palistine. the jews, tired of roman rule revolted and after a two year war they were defeated. the romans sacked jerusalem and returned to rome with the treasures of the the temple.

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  • tompt's Profile Photo

    the Forum, Arch of Titus

    by tompt Written Jan 24, 2004

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    The arch of Titus was erected between 82 and 90 A.D. in honour of Titus. It was made by Domitian, the emperor's brother, to commemorate the victory against the Jews and the capture of Jerusalem by Vespasian and Titus.

    The dedicatory inscription, on the side of the Coloseum is still preserved. The letters were originally bronze, the metal was stolen, and today only the holes of the cramps remains. It says: "Senatus Popolusque Romanus divo Tito divi Vespasiani F(ilio) Vespasiano Augusto" (The Senate and the Roman people to the divine Titus Vespasian Augustus son of the divine Vespasian).

    A bas-relief on the inside of the arch (see picture) represents the procession preceding the emperor as he passes beneath the Triumphal Gate, carrying the catch taken from the temple of Jerusalem, amongst it a seven armed candlestick.

    In the Middle Ages it was nicknamed "Arch of the Seven Lamps" and incorporated into the fortress of the Frangipane family. It was freed in the 19th century during the restoration work directed by Giuseppe Valadier.

    inside of the arch of Titus

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by Jmill42 Updated Mar 27, 2004

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    The Arch of Titus was built in 81 AD, and commemorates the conquest of Jerusalem by some guy named Titus 11 years earlier.
    It is famous for its engraved frieze showing Roman soldiers carrying a Jewish "Menorah" (seven branches chandelier) as a war trophy. Also on top is an engraving with the fanous SPQR.

    "The Senate and People of Rome."

    Arch of Titus

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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by illumina Updated Aug 23, 2006

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    The Arch of Titus is a triumphal arch commemorating the victory of the emperors Vespasian and Titus in Judea in 70 AD and the triumphal procession they held in Rome in 71 AD. It is situated at the east entrance to the Forum Romanum, on the Via Sacra south of the Temple of Amor and Roma, and is close to the Colosseum.

    The arch must have been erected sometimes after the death of Titus in 81 AD, as Titus is referred to as 'Divus' in the inscription. The deification of an emperor only happened posthumously after decision by the senate. It was probably erected by emperor Domitian who succeeded his brother Titus in 81 AD, but may have been built later by Trajan.

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  • jungles's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by jungles Updated May 27, 2006

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    This triumphal arch at the top of the Via Sacra was built to commemorate the sack of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. when the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and brought tens of thousands of Jews back to Rome as slaves, thus beginning the Jewish diaspora. The frieze on the left inside the arch (if you're facing the Colosseum) shows the general Titus, who later became emperor, riding triumphantly into Rome on his chariot, while the one on the right shows Roman soldiers carrying their spoils of victory, including the golden menorah from the temple.

    The arch was at one point incorporated into a medieval wall and had to be heavily restored in 1822. The sculptures on the inside of the arch, however, are the originals.

    Arch of Titus Close-up of the frieze inside the arch
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  • martin_nl's Profile Photo

    Forum: The Arch of Titus

    by martin_nl Updated May 22, 2003

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    When you passed the Temple of Venus and Rome on your right next thing is the Arch of Titus right in front of you. In 81AD Emperor Domitianus erected the arch in memory of Emperor Titus, who was Domitianus' brother, for his victories. The frieze on all four sides of the arch represent Vespasian and Titus's triupmh over the Jews in 71AD after the destruction of Jerusalem. The reliefs are in a quite poor state, but you can make up that soldiers are bearing away the plunder from the Temple of Jerusalem, which includes trumpets and a sevenbranched candelbrum.

    Arch of Titus
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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Arco di Titus

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    At the top of the Velia, in Via Sacra, we found the Arch of Titus which was built by the Senate after the Emperor's death. By this arch the Senate paid respect and honour to Emperor who conquested Jerusalem in 70 A.D. On the inside of the arch are two bas-reliefs, on each side, displaying the Emperor on his triumphal chariot and the procession of the Jewish prisoners carrying a seven branched candelabrum. It was habbit in Rome for the triumphal processions, the victorious emperor or general was followed by ranks of prisoners.

    Arco di Titus Arco di Titus - bas-relief bas-relief at the arch Arco di Titus at the top of Velia

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  • brendareed's Profile Photo

    Forum: Arch of Titus

    by brendareed Written Jun 2, 2014

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    This arch was erected in AD 81 in honor of Titus and Vespasian’s military victories in the Judean War. Titus’ brother Domitian ordered the monument built after Titus’ death. On the inside of the arch are worn reliefs showing the winged Victory and the goddess Roma and another showing the parade of war booty brought back from Jerusalem, in which you clearly see a Menorah and Solomon’s altar. You can get really close to the arch (unlike Constantine’s) and can appreciate the workmanship.

    The Arch of Titus is located at the Colosseum side of the Forum along the Via Sacra on the way up to Palatine Hill. It stands 15.4 meters (50 feet) high and is 13.5 meters (44 feet) wide. The arch was originally built using pentelic marble, but travertine was used during a later reconstruction of the arch making it easy to see where it has been restored.

    During the Middle Ages, the arch was actually incorporated into a family castle, but over several centuries this was dismantled and nowadays nothing is left of this home.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Arco di Tito (Arch of Titus)

    by MM212 Updated Jun 1, 2007

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    Built in the 1st century AD, the Arch of Titus has served as a model for triumphal arches around the world. Emperor Domitian built it after the death of his brother Titus to commemorate the victory of the Roman Empire over Jerusalem. The arch is located within the Roman Forum on Via Sacra and had been badly damaged in the past. Extensive restoration work in recent history has made it whole again.

    Arco di Tito Arch of Titus
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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Arch of Titus

    by smschley Updated Mar 20, 2005

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    n 66 A.D. Jewish Zealots started a revolt against the Roman occupation of Judea. Titus captured Jerusalem in 70 A.D. with four legions. The last vestige of the Zealots fled to Masada causing the Roman to build a huge earth assault ramp to reach the top. Finally after 3 years the fortress was taken and the revolt was finally completely crushed.

    In 79 A.D. Titus became emperor but died just two years late. He was deified by the Roman Senate and his son, emperor Domitian built the Arch of Titus that same year both to honor his father and to commemorate his victory in the Jewish War. The arch was dedicated in 85 A.D. with pomp and ceremony.

    The 50 foot high arch is located at the Roman Forum, the arch stands close to the highest point of the Sacred Way (Sacra Via) which extends from here westwards to the Roman Forum. It is the oldest surviving example of a Roman arch.

    At the inside of the arch are two panels with reliefs. One depicts the triumphal procession with the spoils taken from the Second Temple in Jerusalem: the Menorah; the silver trumpets and the Arc of the Covenant. The other one shows Titus in a chariot accompanied by the Goddess Victoria and the Goddess Roma.

    The Latin writing on the top translates as: The Senate and People of Rome, to Divine Titus Vespasian Augustus, son of Divine Vespasian were originally in bronze. The reliefs were also colored and the arch was topped by a bronze a chariot drawn by four horses.

    The outside faces of the piers are nineteenth-century restorations undertaken as far back as 1821 after demolition of the fortification in which the arch had been incorporated in the Middle Ages. The outer sides were rebuilt in travertine instead of marble, so they would be distinguishable from the original.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Terminus of the Classic Forum

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Arch of Titus arguably encloses the ancient Roman Forum. Beyond this comparatively small memorial to the Emperor who sat while Pompeii fell to Vesuvius and the Coliseum rose above the city, the attractions are more sparse and increasingly less associated with the Forum.

    Arch of Titus, Roman Forum
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  • rachel_sun's Profile Photo

    See the Arch of Titus which was built in 81 AD.

    by rachel_sun Written Feb 25, 2003

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    See the Arch of Titus which was erected in ad 81 by the Emperor Dominitian in honour of the victories of his brother,Titus. Do go to the Patheon in which the 'temple of the gods' in the middle ages became a church.This magnificent building with its domed interior became the symbol of Rome.The rectangular portico screens the vast hemispherical dome and the hole at the top of the dome is the only light you get.There are shrines that line the walls and solid marble floors.Do see the tomb of Raphael,the artists body rests beloe a Madonna by Lprenzetto(1524)

    THE FORUM
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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Arco di Tito

    by Gypsystravels Updated Aug 23, 2006

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    Arco di Tito commemorates the destruction of Jerusalem and its sacred temple by Tittus in AD 70.

    It is said that unitl Israel was founded in 1948 and the return of Palestine became possible, pious Jews refused to walk under this arch.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Arch of Tito

    by lina112 Updated May 12, 2006

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    Arc of Tito is situated at the end of Forum and next to Coliseum, it was built on 81 A.C. to celebrate the victory of Tito on Jerusalem (70 A.C.) after 6 months of fight. Its very well conserve and its a historic simbol.

    El arco de Tito esta situado al final del forum y cerca del coliseo, fue construido en el ano 81 despues de cristo en celebracion de la victoria de Tito en Jerusalem (ano 70 D.C) despues de 6 meses de lucha. Esta muy bien conservado y es un simbolo historico.

    me and arc of tito
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