Roman Forum - Temple of Castor and Pollux, Rome

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  • Temple of Castor and Pollux
    Temple of Castor and Pollux
    by monica71
  • getting soaked on the way to the temple
    getting soaked on the way to the temple
    by monica71
  • Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
    Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Temple of Castor & Pollux (Tempio dei Dioscuri)

    by MM212 Updated Mar 16, 2011

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    The Top of Castor & Pollux in the Spring
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    These three standing columns and the entablature fragment above them are all that remains from the Temple of Castor and Pollux. They are from the last reconstruction of the temple in the early 1st century AD. It is known, though, that the temple had existed since the 5th century BC and was subsequently rebuilt several times. It is known in Italian as il Tempio dei Dioscuri and is dedicated to the mythical twins and horsemen.

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    Foro Romano, Part VI, Temple of Castor & Pollux

    by von.otter Updated Apr 21, 2009

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    Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
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    “All the successive ages since Rome began to decay have done their best to ruin the very ruins by taking away the marble and the hewn stone for their own structures, and leaving only the inner filling up of brickwork, which the ancient architects never designed to be seen.”
    — From the 1858 “French and Italian Note-Books” of Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)

    On 15 July 499 BC during a battle on the shores of Lake Regillus where the Romans took the offensive against their neighboring communities, twin divine knights of extraordinary beauty and stature were seen, with their lances at rest, at the forefront of the cavalry leading it to victory.

    At exactly the same moment in the Foro Romano two identical youths were seen dismounting their horses and leading them to drink at the Fountain of Juturna. Those in the Forum were drawn to the young men and asked of the battle. The youths told their questioners that the Romans had won the day, and immediately vanished. All who had seen them swore that they were the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, twin sons of Jupiter and Leda, and the primary stars in the Gemini constellation.

    A temple was built to the twins by Albinus, the general in command of the cavalry, upon his return to Rome. Over the 1,000 years before Rome’s fall it was expanded and rebuilt many times. These 3 white marble, 41-foot high, Corinthian columns are all that remain of the magnificent temple. Within the podium of the temple there were numerous tabernae, shops, used by jewelers, money changers, and even barbers.

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    Temple of Castor and Pollux

    by monica71 Written Jan 22, 2009

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    Temple of Castor and Pollux
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    Temple of Castor and Pollux: not too much left today (except the 3 massive columns), but still worth mentioning and taking a picture of!

    The temple was built in the honor of Castor and Pollux, the twin sons of Jupiter. The remaining columns are over 48 feet high. The statues of Castor and Pollux can be seen at the top of the stairs of the Capitoline Hill.

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    Forum Romanum: Temple of Castor and Pollux

    by Airpunk Written Mar 8, 2006

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    The famous columns of the temple

    The temple of the dioscuri Castor and Pollux was one of the oldest buildings in the forum romanum. It was erected in the year 484 B.C. and modifications were added through the centuries. It was destroyed in 14 B.C. and rebuilt by Tiberius in 6 B.C. Similar to other buildings in the forum, it deteriorated during the centuries and stones were used for the construction of other buildings. It has remained almost unchanged since the 15th century. The three remaining columns are one of the most famous landmarks in the forum.

    Castor and Pollux, the twin brothers to whom the temple was dedicated to, are sons of Zeus and Leda, although the parental situation is not really clear and a little confusing. Castor is regarded as a great horseman while Pollux is considered as a great boxer. The temple was build to their honour after they "helped" the romans to win the battle of Lake Regillus. For some reason, Castor was worshiped more than his twin brother and so the temple is sometimes also referred to as Aedes Castoris only (instead of Aedis Castoris et Pollucis).

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    Temple of Castor and Pollux

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 29, 2005

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    This relic is dedicated to the twin brothers of Helen of Troy, who were supposed to have appeared at the battle of Lake Regillus in 499 BC, aiding the Romans in their defeat of the Etruscans.

    Although there has been a temple here since the 5th century BC, the columns and elaborate cornice date from AD 6 when the temple was rebuilt.

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  • Julius_Caesar's Profile Photo

    Temple of Castor and Pollux

    by Julius_Caesar Written Feb 4, 2005

    The three slender fluted columns of this temple form one the Forum’s most beautiful ruins. The first temple here was probably dedicated in 484 B.C. in honour of the mythical twins and patrons of horsemanship, Castor and Pollux, but was then rebuilt many times. The surviving columns date from the last time it was rebuilt, by the future Emperor Tiberius after a fire in 12 B.C.

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    the Forum, temple of Castor and Pollux

    by tompt Written Jan 25, 2004

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    temple of Castor and Pollux

    The three colums on this picture are from the temple of Castor and Pollux. The are on the spot of the last site of the temple. It was rebuild here after a fire in the 6th century by the emperor Tiberius.

    Castor and Pollux were twin heroes in classical mythology. Castor was the son of Leda and Tyndareus, Pollux the son of Leda and Zeus. They were great warriors. The legend tells that after Castor was killed Pollux begged Zeus to allow his brother to share his immortality with him. (the classical tradition has it that one of every set of twins is the son of a god and thus immortal) Zeus arranged for the twins to divide their time evenly between Hades and Heaven, and in their honor he created the constellation Gemini.

    The roman dictator Postimus promissed to built them a temple when they helped the Roamns win in the battle of Lake Regillus(499BC). They both appeared at the battlefield and after Rome won they appeared at the Forum to announce the victory. In 484 BC the temple was first build.

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    Forum: Temple of Castor and Pollux

    by martin_nl Updated May 23, 2003

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    Temple of Castor and Pollux

    The first Temple of Castor and Pollux, was probably erected here in 484BC and is one of the oldest on the Forum and dedicated to the famous mythological twins. The three columns that are left of the temple were placed at the last redecoration after a fire in 6AD, by Emperor Tiberius.

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