Temple of Hadrian, Rome

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  • Temple of Hadrian
    by brendareed
  • Temple of Hadrian
    by brendareed
  • Temple of Hadrian
    by brendareed
  • brendareed's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by brendareed Written Jun 2, 2014

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    ust a short walk from Sant’ Ignazio di Loyola church and the Pantheon are the remains of Hadrian’s temple, built by Hadrian’s adopted son in AD 145.

    At one time this was a grand temple in the octostyle, which meant it had eight columns in the shorter front side of the structure. On both sides of this temple were 15 columns, although the remains we see today is only one of these longer sides and four of the original 15 columns are missing, leaving us with 11 tall, stone columns that had been part of a palace in the 17th century and are now part of the façade of the Chamber of Commerce building.

    As you look up at the columns, you can see the Corinthian tops to the columns which stand nearly 50 feet tall. The Temple of Hadrian has been called the Temple of Neptune by mistake in the past. Today is stands are a testament to the architectural marvels of ancient Rome in the Piazza di Pietra, whose paving stones are made from temple stones.

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    Tempio di Hadrian

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 26, 2011

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    Colonnade of Tempio di Hadrian

    The Temple of Hadrian was built in 145 by Antonius Pius, who was emperor's adoptive son and successor. Unfortunately, only the side colonnade (Corinthian styled columns) of the temple survived and now incorporeted into a later building in the Piazza di Pietra (The Stone Square). The temple originally was at Campo Marzio. Sad fact is that the stone of the temple was later used to build the square.

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    Temple of Hadrian

    by mindcrime Written Mar 20, 2011

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    Temple of Hadrian

    Many people expect to see the temple of Hadrian(templo di Adriano) but what you can really see is just a wall from the north side of the temple and one row of the original columns that are attached to one side of the Stock Exchange Building which was built in 1700 when pope Innocent XII asked architect Carlo Fontana(1634-1714) for a new papal customs office.

    I always thought that Hadrian was the one that built the Temple but the truth is that it was built in 145AD by his successor emperor Antininus Pius and dedicate it to Hadrian.

    We didn’t really spend much time here (we were on our way to Pantheon anyway) so we just took some pictures of the Corinthian columns (they are 15metre high) Originally the temple had 46 columns(15 columns on each long style and 8 on the other sides).

    By the way the temple is located on Piazza di Pietra (stone square), a name derived from the fact that temple columns and stones were used to build the square). In the old time it was called Campus Martius(field of Mars)

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    Piazza di Pietra & Hadrian's Temple

    by monica71 Updated Jan 27, 2009

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    original columns of Hadrian's Temple
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    We almost missed this site, but we were lucky to have downloaded a Rome walk that covered this piazza also. If you like the blend of old and new, you should not miss this place! This is the only building in Rome that has original temple ruins incorporated into a modern building. The building is used today by Rome Stock Exchange and the Chamber of Commerce.

    The original temple (only 11 of the original 15 columns which formed one side of the temple remain) was dedicated to Hadrian and was built by his son Antoninus Pius in 145 AD.

    The piazza is very close to the Pantheon, so make sure you stop by after you finish visiting the Pantheon.

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    Temple of Hadrian

    by Karahan Written Jan 24, 2007

    The temple was built for Emperor Hadrian by Antoninus Pius. You can still see some columns at south side of Piazza di Pietra. It's compounded with a 17th century building. The building was used as Papal Customs in 1700s, now part of the Stock Exchange of Rome (la borsa).

    This is also a stop on the way of Pantheon. There are some street artists and small fountain where you can drink some cool water at small square.

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    Temple of Hadrian - Columns

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 13, 2006

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    Temple of Hadrian, Columns

    The 11 marble Corinthian columns are the remains of the Temple of Hadrian. During the 17th century they were incorporated into a building.

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  • Julius_Caesar's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by Julius_Caesar Written Apr 5, 2005

    This temple, built to honour the Emperor Hadrian as a god, was dedicated by his successor Antoninus Pius in AD 145. The remains were incorporated in a 17th century building.

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  • martin_nl's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by martin_nl Updated May 25, 2003

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    Temple of Hadrian

    The remains of the temple dedicated to Hadrian, which are 11 marble Corinthian columns are incorporated into a 17th century building. The building was most recently used as the Roman stock exchange.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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