Tevere - Tiber River & Bridges, Rome

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  • Flume Tevere over the Tiber River
    Flume Tevere over the Tiber River
    by apbeaches
  • The Tiber at night
    The Tiber at night
    by iblatt
  • The Tiber at dusk
    The Tiber at dusk
    by iblatt
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Tevere - The nicest part.

    by breughel Updated Sep 7, 2013

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    Tevere-Tiber near Castel Sant'Angelo.
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    One of the nicest parts of the Tevere-Tiber is for me the part of the river between the Umberto I bridge and the Vittorio Emanuele II bridge. This is the part facing eastwards the Palace of Justice and westwards the bridge leading to the Piazza San Pietro with in the middle the Castel S. Angelo.

    Best views are from the river bank called Lungotevere Tor di Nona facing the castle. Around 1400 stood in this area a medieval tower called Torre dell'Annona belonging to the Orsini and used as a pontifical prison.
    When a new prison was built Tor di Nona was rebuilt in 1667 as a theatre called Teatro Apollo which the largest lyric theater of Rome. When the embankments (lungoteveri) of the Tiber were built in 1888 the theater disapeared but the name remained.

    This part of the river is furthermore enhanced with the most elegant bridge of Rome: Ponte Sant'Angelo. No visitor should miss a walk on this riverbank.

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    Rome's River, the Tevere

    by iblatt Updated Oct 18, 2011

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    The Tiber at dusk
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    The Tiber (Tevere) is very different from the Thames in London, the Seine in Paris or the Danube in Vienna and Budapest. It seems to have a life of its own, separate from the rhythm of life of the city. There are no ships, hardly any activity on or along the river. Traffic flows on the Lungotevere boulevards along it, but it seems like nobody takes notice of the river flowing underneath.

    This was not always the case: The embankments were only built in the 19th century; until then there used to be houses along the river; in previous century the ruver was navigable; the Tiber was used for fishing,bathing and even for drinking water. However, it always had its problems, with sediment and silting requiring regular heroic maintenance, and finally making it unsuitable for navigation. Floods used to occur in the adjoining areas until the high embankments were constructed. They also creaed a separation between the boulevards high above the river and the water far down below.

    A walk along the Tiber at dusk or at night can be very Romantic. There are restaurants down by the river, which suddenly ligt up and become noticeable after dark. Some of the older bridges are pedestrian bridges, such as the Ponte Sant'Angelo.
    Some of Rome's attractions, such as Catel Sant'Angelo and the Jewish Ghetto and Synagogue, are situated along the Tiber ans can be comnined with a "Tiber walk".

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  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    Tiber River and Bridges

    by WheninRome Updated Feb 14, 2009

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    Tiber River from the Ponte Cestio Bridge

    We only spent one evening near the Tiber River and only walked across 1 bridge, the Ponte Fabricio/Ponte Cestio bridge, which spans the Tiber River in 2 segments and connects to the Isola Tiberina (Island in the Tiber). I guess if you are going to walk across 1 bridge in Rome, this is the one to walk across.

    We were in Rome shortly after a period of intense rain and flooding. The Tiber had returned to normal levels, but it was obvious how high it had flowed just a couple weeks before. Unfortunately, it looks like the Tiber is somewhat forgotten as it had quite a bit of litter (mostly plastic bags and bottles) in and around it. The River has largely also been walled in to prevent flooding, but it also prevents people from reaching it. There appeared to be a bike path running along the River that I would like to walk along on my next visit to Roma.

    I saw on the television on New Year's Day that a couple wild and crazy locals dive off of one of the Tiber's bridges into the chilly and dirty waters below. Brave souls.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    A short walk along the Tiber

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Aug 11, 2008

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    Ponte Fabricio
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    No matter where you are in the centre of Rome, you're never far from some other point of interest. Whichever way you turn as you leave the place you've just been visiting, having lunch in, whatever, is bound to lead you somewhere interesting. Standing in front of the Synagogue after our tour of the ghetto, we had to decide - left, right or straight ahead (behind would have taken us back into the ghetto).

    Pretty much straight in front of us, the Ponte Fabricio (the oldest bridge in Rome, dating back to 62BC and still in everyday use) led across to the Isola Tiberia, the tiny island in the middle of the river - but that was where we were meeting a friend the next day, so not that way.

    Right, up river, leads around a big bend in the river towards Castel Sant' Angelo; turning left takes you towards the Ponte Palatino and the Forum Boarium which once had a port on the river. Either way, the walk is lovely. The river banks are lined with sycamores and there are paths both at street level or down at river level.

    We turned left and strolled along the Lungotavere de Pierleoni until we reached the Ponte Palatino. From this bridge you can see the last remaining pier of Rome's first stone-built bridge, the Ponte Rotto. It dates back to 181BC and was in use until the late 16th century, when storm damage left it in ruins. Ponte Rotto means Broken Bridge.

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  • wilocrek's Profile Photo

    The Bridge's of Rome

    by wilocrek Written Mar 29, 2008

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    To see a different side of Rome take a stroll along the banks of the Tiber River and take in the different views of the many different bridges of Rome. Not only will it take you away from the crowds, it will also provide many different photo opportunities. This is an excellent way to spend a few hours during any time of the day.

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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    walk about!

    by iaint Written Dec 4, 2007

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    Castel Sant'Angelo seen from Ponte Principe...
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    Our first morning was sunny and beautiful - December, so not warm. We walked from the Colosseum to St Peters, taking back streets and along the river as much as possible.

    Just great, and the perfect way to prepare for pizza and beer at lunchtime!

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  • fairy_dust's Profile Photo

    Bridges

    by fairy_dust Written Aug 24, 2007
    A bridge
    4 more images

    There are several ancient stone bridges going across the Tiber river, and none are the same. Every one has a different shape, different statues, etc and each is a work of art. On the pedestrian bridges you'll likely find vendors selling counterfeit handbags and crap, but the bridges are totally worth checking out.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    River Tiber

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 26, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The River Tiber forms the heart of the city, yet, other than its initial beginnings where settlement developed at the easiest crossing point, due to the silting and low levels, has never formed a major part of the city's lifeline - the main port was Ostia at the river mouth 25kms south west of the city. Up until 1870, the city also flooded regularly until the embankments on both banks were built. Yet its many bridges and the grand avenues running along its banks, linking areas such as Trastevere to the city, make it a vital part of touring the city.

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  • icunme's Profile Photo

    TIBER BEACH - sand and all right in Rome

    by icunme Updated Aug 14, 2006

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    Tiber Beach at Ponte Sant Angelo
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    So, don't fight that Ostia traffic - come right here to the banks of the Tiber............
    Sand, lounge chairs, umbrellas, 2 swimming pools, cafe, bar - and great view of passing boats -- Castel Sant Angelo in the background!

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  • icunme's Profile Photo

    Tosca on the Tiber - and more............

    by icunme Written Jul 7, 2006

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    Waves in the form of music splash about the "Beach of Roma" (aka the banks of the Tevere). The Tevere's floating stage resounds with a constant flow of entertainment throughout the summer 2006.
    Puccini's TOSCA - presented on the floating Tevere stage - all this and with the lights of Castel Sant Angelo in the background. An exhilarating sight to behold and the ultimate romantic evening in Roma - a dinner cruise of the Tevere capped by music under the stars! (OK, maybe stars are seldome seen over Rome)
    More photos to come as we attend events.
    Tickets range from 5 Euro to 25 Euro depending on the performance - purchase ticket at sidewalk ticket booth.

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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    The Tevere

    by illumina Written May 24, 2006

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    The Tiber from Ponte Margherita

    The River Tiber, or Tevere in Italian, is the 3rd longest river in Italy. Legend says Rome's founders, the twin brothers Romulus and Remus, were abandoned on its waters, where they were rescued by the she-wolf.

    We walked along the river all the way from Vatican city to Isola Tiberina, and on the walls between the river and the much higher road were lots of graffiti-like murals; variations on the theme of the famous Etruscan bronze statue of the she-wolf (Romulus and Remus were added to the sculpture later, and none of the murals show them).

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  • Jenniflower's Profile Photo

    The grand Tavere (Tiber) River

    by Jenniflower Updated May 23, 2006

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    My sister posing on the banks of the river

    I was quite confused when I was doing my research prior to the holiday - puzzled with there being a Tiber and a Tevere River, but only one river on the map.... so I asked an Italian coleague and he told me the one (Tevere) is the Italian name and the other is the (Tiber) English name.

    It is the second longest river in Italy, winding its way through the bustling city.

    This has to be one of the nicest and prettiest routes to walk in Rome.

    We started walking form our hotel (near the Piazza Novana), and walked to The Vatican.

    This took us 20 minutes, bearing in mind we had a baby with buggy/pram with us too which slows things down.

    The trees are beautiful along the river path, the view unspoilt.

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  • icunme's Profile Photo

    Lights of Roma from a Tiber Dinner Cruise

    by icunme Updated May 20, 2006

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    Dinner cruise along the Tiber
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    You can enjoy a different night dining at the River Cafe aboard the Agrippina Maggiore, the Queen of Battelli di Roma's fleet. The traditional Italian cuisine, the elegant and cordial atmosphere and the background music are all the ingredients for a lovely evening as you view the lights of Roma floating by.
    The tour lasts 2 hours and 15 minutes. Service operates on Thurs, Fri, Sat except for weather conditions that prevent a cruise and departs between 9 p.m. from Castel Sant Angelo. The boat is available on request for exclusive events even during other days of the week.
    53 Euro per person excluding beverages - many options available on different tours.
    Disabled people can access the service.

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    • Sailing and Boating

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  • no1birdlady's Profile Photo

    Stroll Along the Tiber River

    by no1birdlady Written Sep 6, 2005

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    Tiber River in Old Rome

    Rome was built where there was an easy ford in the Tiber River. This is the case with many cities. But a problem was that it flooded the city every winter up until 1870 when work began on the massive Lungotevere embankments that run along both sides of the river confining it. You can see the walls in the photo. I enjoyed looking at gulls and ducks along the river.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    The Tiber

    by Willettsworld Written Jul 27, 2005

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    The Tiber river rises in the Apennines of Tuscany and Emilia Romagna and crosses, after a route of more than 400 Km, Tuscany, Umbria, the hills of Rome to finally flows into the Tyrrhenian sea. The Romans called it Tiberis and it is part of the history of the first settlements in the area of the Ancient Ostia. During the imperial era the river had a fundamental role for the trade which had as a core Ostia's harbour. Inexhaustible source of resources for Rome, the Tiber has been, at times, also a problem for the floods that affected the city over the centuries, the last of which happened in 1870.

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