Theatre of Marcellus, Rome

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  • Turska's Profile Photo

    I was sorry to not get in

    by Turska Written Oct 13, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We were planning to go here,and had thought that it takes an hour or so,but it is closed to public!At guidebooks I had,there wasn´t told that,and it came as an surprice.We walked around it,but since you couldn´t get in,it was quickly seen.

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    Temple of Apollo Sosianus

    by Julius_Caesar Written Feb 1, 2005

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    In Rome, to see beautiful, ancient ruins you don’t have to visit necessarily the Forums. Here and there you can see several remains of temples, columns and other buildings. These three columns, for example, are located in front of the theatre of Marcellus, and belong to the temple of Apollo Sosianus, called like this because Caius Sosius, who sided with Marc Anthony during the civil war, after the rise to power of Octavianus (later on Augustus) restored an ancient temple dedicated to Apollo in order to win the favor of his successful enemy. All around the temple you can see on the ground beautiful, coloured marble pieces of columns.

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    Teatro di Marcello: Now, a Place to Call Home

    by von.otter Written Apr 14, 2010

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    Teatro di Marcello, Roma, May 2007
    4 more images

    “Whatever beauty there may be in a Roman ruin is the remnant of what was beautiful originally … If we ever build such noble structures as these Roman ones, we can have just as good ruins, after two thousand years, in the United States.”
    — from the 1858 “French and Italian Note-Books” of Nathaniel Hawthorne

    NEW VS. OLD How would we ever know what sort of ruins the United States would have? Very little is ever allowed to stay standing for more than 100 years, or much less. At the slightest sign of age, Americans tear down a building and put up another. That is not how things are done in Rome; after all it was not built in a day.

    In 22 BC, Caesar Augustus resumed a building project begun by his uncle, Julius Caesar, in 44 BC, the year he was assassinated. This theater, the largest of the Roman Empire, was dedicated in 13 BC and named Theatrum Marcelli in memory of Marcellus, the son of Augustus’ sister Octavia. Marcellus was the intended heir of Augustus, but he died at a young age. When completed in 11 BC, the 98-foot high, semi-circular theater could accommodate more than 14,000 spectators.

    By the 12th century, the theater was owned by the Favvi family, who turned it into a fortress. By the early 16th century, the Orsini family had transformed the building into a palazzo. Today the upper portion is divided into apartments (see photos #1 & #2); if we move to Rome, this would be the place to live.

    The three columns (see photo #3), next to Theatre of Marcellus (Latin: Theatrum Marcelli, Italian: Teatro di Marcello), were part of the Temple of Apollo Sosianus. Its present name comes from the man in charge of its final rebuilding, Gaius Sosius. The current full-height columns were part of a reconstruction project undertaken during Augustus’s reign.

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    Theater of Marcellus

    by roamer61 Written May 3, 2009

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    A great theater of antiquity, it was built in the last quarter of the 1s Century BC. It was inaugurated by Augustus in 12 BC. It was later held as a fortress from then11th theough 13th Centuries before a palace was built atop of it in the 16th Century. It remains however, one of the finest examples of Roman Architecture from the Republican Era.

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    Lesser known ruins?

    by unigirl Written Jun 17, 2005
    No, it's not the Coloseum!!

    I found this place while walking along...somewhere....I don't know, I was lost! It was such a beautiful spot and much more dense than the Roman forum ruins. Everything here felt more compact and it was like I was walking among ruin "highrises".

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    theater of marcellus

    by doug48 Written Jul 25, 2006

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    theater of marcellus

    the theater of marcellus is a vast amphitheater located on the banks of the tiber. it was built by emperor augustus who dedicated the building to his nephew marcellus who died at age 19 in 23BC.

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    Teatro Marcello

    by Polly74 Written May 19, 2004

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    Teatro di Marcello

    This splendid monument worth a visit.
    During '500, architect Baldassarre Peruzzi builded up a palace using two floors of arches that remained from the theatre of the 1st century a.C.

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    The Portico of Octavia

    by martin_nl Updated Jun 2, 2003

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    The Portico of Octavia

    This portico is all that rests of the Circus Flaminius square. Octavia is Augustus' sister, who left Marcus Antonius.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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